Clutch drills

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Since you seem to be talking to me here is my reply: I am familiar with reduced shank drills, so what? It does not elminate the need for a 1/2" chuck. Some drills and attachments will not fit a 3/8" chuck. That is a fact.

In general that is true. What it also true is that the exact same drill is often available with both sized chucks. I owned a 3/8" drill when I started but discovered it's limitation right away. I will not buy another and do not reccomend them. Most who buy a 3/8" drill are simply not aware of it's limited capacity.

To call is needless overkill is a needless exaggeration. The maximum opening of the chuck does not affect it's usefulness to a beginner in any way except that if you buy a 3/8" drill you almost always eventually regret it and have to buy another to replace it.
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Lawrence wrote: ...

I'd say for most "beginner" uses, the higher rpm and lighter/smaller form factor far outweigh the advantage of the larger chuck capacity. I'd also say the other, if determined to be needed, doesn't "replace" the original but "augments" it...
IMO, ymmv, $0.02, etc., etc., ... :)
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On Thu, 07 Jun 2007 20:57:03 -0700, "Mike S."

For a beginner, get one of these. Far less chance of having a catastrophic disaster.
http://media.academyart.edu/classes/FASCU/FASCU_232/FASCU232_materials/images/hand_drill.jpg
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Well, I guess it means the drill has a clutch.

A clutch is probably most used for driving screws and tightening nuts so you don't overtighten (after you get familiar with the clutch/torque settings).

Cordless drills are the only way to go. I think they all have a clutch. A clutch is great IMO.
You bypass the clutch when you drill. You don't want the drill bit to stop. Keeping the drill bit from binding is what the specific drill setting that bypasses the clutch is for.
Good luck and have fun.
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By the way!
Avoid two-piece keyless chucks like the plague.
They probably cost less to manufacture than a keyed chuck, and they are just plain horrible.
Make sure it has a single sleeve keyless chuck, preferably ratcheting.
If for some reason you get stuck with a two-piece keyless chuck, you might want to buy a quickchange chuck and keep that installed most of the time.
Also. If I'm not mistaken, besides quickchange drill bits, they are making tri or hex shank drill bits nowadays. Round shank drill bits are a thing of the past to me (there might be exceptions of course).
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Only way to go?? Cordless drills are fun and useful and I have several.
They are toys compared to a good corded drill. It is a mistake to buy one if you don't yet have a corded.
Long after our cordless drills are trash, my Milwaukee corded will still be running, have more power, be more reliable, and will have cost less to purchase than a cordless drill. It will also cost less to operate when replacement costs are included.
I'm guessing that you and a lot of people out there have invested in the cordless without ever owning a corded one. That's too bad. The most important drill anyone should buy will have a cord, IMHO.
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Lawrence wrote:

More do than don't now, I'd agree. "All" I think is not likely to be the case--while I've not gone shopping lately, can't imagine there aren't clutchless cordless drills still being manufactured. Just a point of reinforcing Edwin's mantra of earlier -- "generalizations generally are wrong"... :)
For lots of applications I'll certainly grant clutches are useful and desirable--for one primary reason it allows the use of a drill as a dual-purpose tool of a driver with much more ease and reliability than the old ploy of trying to manipulate the VS trigger...

>

Having chastised John, I'll repeat: "generalizations generally are wrong"... :) It depends on what you compare to what. You can find cordless that are stouter than some wimpy corded and vice versa.
And, it may well make sense for a casual homeowner to have a cordless first. Convenience for small jobs and outside things that come up like the pop rivet on the downspout strap or similar are the kind of routine maintenance that _most_ homeowners run into. Dragging out the extension cord for such is a real pita compared to grabbing the cordless.

There is some truth there, granted. But, that comes at the price of convenience and most are willing to make the tradeoff. There certainly is a place for both.

"generalizations generally are overly general"... :)
im(ns)ho, ymmv, $0.02, etc., etc., etc., ... :)
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snip
Depends on your needs. I've had many corded drills too. I probably still have one. I don't know where it is as I've not looked for it for many years. Don't miss it, have not needed it.
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