Clothes washer leaks water on floor

I think I am probably just going to get another clothes washer rather than try to fix this one. That's mostly because I am not that good at repairing washers and dryers etc, and the cost of getting someone to repair it often comes close to the cost just buying a new one anyway.
But, here's the story in case anyone has any thoughts or suggestions:
It is a GE Heavy Duty Super Capacity clothes washer, Model number WBSR1060T5AA . Here's the User Manual: http://www.geappliances.com/search/older-pdfs/49-9981.PDF
I did go to http://repairclinic.com which I always do, and I looked at all of the videos that I could find there and read the symptom list.
Here is what happens: When set on "Small" load size, it works fine, When set on "Large" load size, it leaks a little water (not much, maybe a pint or two) on the floor. The water comes out onto the floor from under the washer near the left rear while facing the washer. On "Super" load size, it leaks a lot. Lots of water coming out on the floor from under the washer on the left rear side.
When I open the lid during the spin cycle, it keeps spinning, which seems unusual since I thought most washers had a shutoff that prevents spinning with the lid open. When I open the lid while agitating, I can stick a pen or whatever into the lid switch so it keeps agitating with the lid open.
On the "Super" load size setting, I noticed that it fills up pretty high, but instead of then draining out and water being pumped out before it starts spinning, it starts spinning right away. And, it appears that the force of the spinning causes the already-high water level to rise up and flow over the top of the tub -- apparently. that's what is causes the water on the floor. On the "Small" and "large" load size setting, it does drain first, then spins, but a little water still seems to leak on when set on the "Large" load size setting.
Too bad that our friend Stormy isn't still here with us because I'd bet that he would have an idea or two as to what the problem may be.
The washer isn't in my house. It is in a home that has foster kids in it. So, most likely, instead of me trying to figure it out, I will probably just buy a new one. I usually buy clothes washers at Lowes because they have free next day delivery and they set the new one up and they take the old one away.
But, still, I usually like to have an idea of what the underlying problem and/or fix is. Once in a while it is something simple that I could do myself.
Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated.
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I think I am probably just going to get another clothes washer rather than try to fix this one. That's mostly because I am not that good at repairing washers and dryers etc, and the cost of getting someone to repair it often comes close to the cost just buying a new one anyway.
But, here's the story in case anyone has any thoughts or suggestions:
It is a GE Heavy Duty Super Capacity clothes washer, Model number WBSR1060T5AA . Here's the User Manual: http://www.geappliances.com/search/older-pdfs/49-9981.PDF
I did go to http://repairclinic.com which I always do, and I looked at all of the videos that I could find there and read the symptom list.
Here is what happens: When set on "Small" load size, it works fine, When set on "Large" load size, it leaks a little water (not much, maybe a pint or two) on the floor. The water comes out onto the floor from under the washer near the left rear while facing the washer. On "Super" load size, it leaks a lot. Lots of water coming out on the floor from under the washer on the left rear side.
When I open the lid during the spin cycle, it keeps spinning, which seems unusual since I thought most washers had a shutoff that prevents spinning with the lid open. When I open the lid while agitating, I can stick a pen or whatever into the lid switch so it keeps agitating with the lid open.
On the "Super" load size setting, I noticed that it fills up pretty high, but instead of then draining out and water being pumped out before it starts spinning, it starts spinning right away. And, it appears that the force of the spinning causes the already-high water level to rise up and flow over the top of the tub -- apparently. that's what is causes the water on the floor. On the "Small" and "large" load size setting, it does drain first, then spins, but a little water still seems to leak on when set on the "Large" load size setting.
Too bad that our friend Stormy isn't still here with us because I'd bet that he would have an idea or two as to what the problem may be.
The washer isn't in my house. It is in a home that has foster kids in it. So, most likely, instead of me trying to figure it out, I will probably just buy a new one. I usually buy clothes washers at Lowes because they have free next day delivery and they set the new one up and they take the old one away.
But, still, I usually like to have an idea of what the underlying problem and/or fix is. Once in a while it is something simple that I could do myself.
Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated.
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There's probably a small hole in the tub somewhere above the "small load" water line. Fill it to the "small load" level and then add water slowly by hand and you can probably pinpoint the level. I would suggest adding it very slowly. If you wait long enough between each additional amount of water you add over the small waterline you should see leaking shortly after it reaches the suspect hole.
--
Bobby G.



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On 8/20/2016 11:47 AM, TomR wrote:

The tub was steel, not stainless or plastic. Inspecting the tub revealed a band under the rim that had rusted through. While clearly not a permanent fix I just epoxied the band and any holes. The repair lasted for at least 5 years when I sold the house.
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I think your diagnosis is correct, but just in case check a couple more thi ngs.
My washer left a flood on the floor recently. Looking on the internet, it seemed the most likely cause was the failure of the input valve to shut off . So we started turning off the hoses after using it. But it could also b e a timer thing, and a couple of times the timer seemed to not complete the cycle.
It didn't happen every time, nor even that often. But finally I stayed and watched the whole wash, and that time it overflowed - but not from the was her. The drain pipe was backing up. On a small load it handled it, but on a full load it didn't.
I snaked it out good and got back some scraps of yarn. It didn't seem like enough to cause a backup but it hasn't recurred.
So, lots of things that can cause this. A leak, failure of the fill valve to close, failure of the timer, small clog in the drain pipe. Gotta check them all.
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I think your diagnosis is correct, but just in case check a couple more things.
My washer left a flood on the floor recently. Looking on the internet, it seemed the most likely cause was the failure of the input valve to shut off. So we started turning off the hoses after using it. But it could also be a timer thing, and a couple of times the timer seemed to not complete the cycle.
It didn't happen every time, nor even that often. But finally I stayed and watched the whole wash, and that time it overflowed - but not from the washer. The drain pipe was backing up. On a small load it handled it, but on a full load it didn't.
I snaked it out good and got back some scraps of yarn. It didn't seem like enough to cause a backup but it hasn't recurred.
So, lots of things that can cause this. A leak, failure of the fill valve to close, failure of the timer, small clog in the drain pipe. Gotta check them all.
---------------------------
Thanks. We did spend a long time on two occasions trying to re-create the situation. We were able to re-create it by doing wash cycles over and over and we were careful to check those other options such as a clogged drain line or a leaking drain hose etc.
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the drum too, and say that epoxy is better, but if it were in a flat area, even a big (wide and long) application of duck tape might well last for years. I know I used it to fix some leak and it lasted a year even though it was under home water pressure, not like the drum where there is only a tiny bit of pressure.
And I was going to say that if you did buy a new machine to tape a paper inside the lid telling whoever sees it what's wrong with the machine. I don't think many new appliance dealers sell repaired appliances, but I do think many sell them, at least I hope they do, to repairmen in poorer n'hoods. Sometimes those shops are crowded and not so well outfitted, and to hook up water, power, and drain to test a machine means putting it in the aisle where they normally walk, or even maybe putting it outside, so if they only have to do this once, after they've fixed it, that's better than having to spend again all the time you had spent hooking it up and watching it for a diagnosis, while the machine is in the way.
One such store is between me and downtown and it that has a washer or dryer or two just in front of his small store during the day, and probably has more in back. He's not getting rich and anything that helps him make money, since in this story you would have already diagnosed it, seems like a good idea.

I once fixed my dishwasher, which wouldn't drain, by running it over and over, and I didnt' realize the water heater inside the dishwasher was making the water hotter and hotter. Everything was fine except one plastic salad bowl that I like had warped quite a bit. I had another one however and later got more. (A black salad dish widely sold in the 70's.)

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On 8/20/2016 3:47 PM, TomR wrote:

Either a bad timer or water level pressure switch.
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Thanks. If it's a bad timer, the part costs about $200, so I would probably just buy a new washer.
But, if it's a bad water level pressure switch, the parts costs about $32. And this video shows how to replace it -- not too difficult:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vt49b_bNPD0

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P.S. Interesting. I found another video that makes replacing the water level pressure switch look even easier:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_3WfRff41E

Plus a video on how to test the water level pressure switch (which I probably won't do since I don't have the tester anyway):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H2MxNYWsVSw

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On Saturday, August 20, 2016 at 8:48:35 PM UTC-4, TomR wrote:

if the machine has ran well for over 5 years, the new spiffy machine will be a disappointment......
new models are built on the cheap as junk
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Since the water level pressure switch only costs about $32, and today I confirmed that it is an easy switch-out, I am probably going to just try replacing that part and see what happens. I'll check at the appliance parts place near me to see if they have it in stock or need to order it. And, I'll post back here what happens.
P.S. For some reason, on one of my computers, I can't se my own thread on this topic. Very strange. I am on my home computer now and I can see it here.
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Well, I went ahead and I bought the water level pressure switch. It ended up costing $47 with the sales tax at my local appliance parts store. I took a chance, bought it, and put it in -- very easy to do.
The bad news is that it didn't fix the problem. The washer still leaks badly when set on large loads. So, I ended up wasting $47 and some time. The appliance parts store does not accept returns of parts if they don't fix the problem. I don't blame them for having that policy.
Now I am going to just buy a new washer.
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On 8/24/2016 4:50 PM, TomR wrote:

Might it be the air gap antisiphon thing just past the water solenoid?
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Thanks but don't think so. The water comes out from under the machine when the tub is full and it starts to spin. It is not coming out from the drain hose. But, even if your possible guess were correct, I wouldn't know how to fix it myself. It would be out of my skill level without me doing a ton of research and spending a lot of time taking the machine apart to try to figure it out. At this point, I think I should just buy a new washer.
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On 8/24/2016 9:47 PM, TomR wrote:

I just fixed mine, but it was leaking water on the floor during the fill cycle.
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"TomR" wrote in message

Thanks but don't think so. The water comes out from under the machine when the tub is full and it starts to spin. It is not coming out from the drain hose. But, even if your possible guess were correct, I wouldn't know how to fix it myself. It would be out of my skill level without me doing a ton of research and spending a lot of time taking the machine apart to try to figure it out. At this point, I think I should just buy a new washer.
It is not suppose to have any water in tub when machine start to spin It looks like that sequencer is not doing what it suppose to do.
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Thanks. I am not sure what the "sequencer" is -- maybe the timer? If so, the timer would have cost $195 for just the part, so I didn't try that.
I did buy a new washer and the old one is gone. I put a sign on it explaining what the symptoms were in case whoever got it wanted to try to fix it. But the people who took it away said it would probably be used for scrap metal.
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"TomR" wrote in message

Thanks. I am not sure what the "sequencer" is -- maybe the timer? If so, the timer would have cost $195 for just the part, so I didn't try that.
I did buy a new washer and the old one is gone. I put a sign on it explaining what the symptoms were in case whoever got it wanted to try to fix it. But the people who took it away said it would probably be used for scrap metal.
sequencer and timer usually combine, but you did right thing by buying new Machine.
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That's really strange, because the spin cycle is more dangerous than agitate, and they know it. And your lid switch works for agitate but not spin? It should work for both. What make of machine is this?

So now that you cleaned out the drain, what's happened with this symptom?

When I've been in a hurry and manually advancing the timer, I've started the spin cycle when there is still 2 or 3 inches of water in the drum. The whirlpool/kenmore continues to pump it out though maybe not as completely as if I'd waited.

Yes, it is. I miss him.

I'd bet that Lowes has someone who buys the broken machines -- at least I hope so, instead of just putting them in landfill -- so see my other post about leaving then next repairman a note about whatever is wrong. He'll have more time than you do and your note can let them decide if your machine is worth selling, or buying. I'm sure there are those that are so rusty Lowes doesn't try to sell them.

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