Closet Doors

I have a closet door that is 81 inches high and 49 inches across (these measurements are without the jam that is 3/4" thick). With the jam, the total length across is only 47.5 inches and the standard door in Home Depot is 24" across (or 48" with 2 doors). Does anyone have an easy solution?
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

What are you trying to do?
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Sorry. Forgot to include the most important part. I want to hang a door in that space. The original owner had bought a sliding door but because they put a hot water heater in the closet, they didn't have enough room to install the sliding doors as the heater sticks out a bit. So they tacked wood outside the frame and hung the door on that. i would like to rehang doors that are flush with the wall.
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Had the same issue and used double doors and trimmed them to fit
wrote:

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bob kater wrote:

Meaning Bi-fold doors?
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You can get standard doors in 2" width increments, but you'll have to special-order the less common widths. You can get custom-made doors in any size you want, but you'll have to pay extra.
For a 49" rough opening, I would buy a 46" door and add shims to both sides to make up the difference. The documentation the door will tell you what size rough opening it needs. I like to have 1.5" extra width for a prehung door so I can put shims around it to make it plumb and square.
--
Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement
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on 4/29/2008 2:37 PM snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com said the following:

I had a similar situation. What I did was to cut the wallboard 1-1/2 inches from the rough opening on one side and removed one of the double studs, then used shims behind the jambs to make up the difference in width.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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If I understand what you are trying to do and the doors are going to be painted. Why not get a couple of 1.5" x 3/8" x 82" strips and glue them to the side of each door. I think this would be easier than shifting the frame and the mess will be outside.
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On Tue, 29 Apr 2008 11:37:10 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Are you talking about bypass or bifold doors? Is the opening finished. ie drywalled.
If so, the opening is standard. One inch larger than the door size. You use half jambs to cover the gap between the bifold/bypass doors and the finished opening. Casing as on all doors.
Ken
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