Climate change

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CRNG posted for all of us...

Did you clear this post with AL Gorp & Obama?
--
Tekkie

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| (ANN Topeka) The Kansas Department of the Interior, Office of | Technology released a study today on the effect of climate change on | Kansas agriculture. Dr. Merrill Crawford, chairman of the committee | project summarized the report and said that within the next 75 years, | Kansas will no longer be able to grow the same quantify of corn that | it does now. "This is unfortunate, of course, but we think we can | replace much of the corn acreage with pineapple, which will do very | well in the new climate."
I expect that's the least of their problems. They've been depleting the aquifer for decades now. It probably won't be long before not much of anything can be grown in Kansas. Like fossil fuels and anti-biotics, we just happen to be living through a brief Golden Age of Midwest farming that's simply not sustainable.
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Politicians won't hesitate to blame global warming
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On Sat, 9 Apr 2016 22:42:06 -0400, "Mayayana"

That is true and we are going to run out of water far sooner than we run out of oil. It is not just the Ogalalla in the mid west, a big part of the dispute in the West Bank as about water and in South Asia water may end up being a bigger problem than any other thing.
People say we will just desalinate sea water and that might work for drinking but it is nowhere near viable for agriculture. The sad thing is the biggest agricultural crop in this country, using as much water as they do growing corn is the lawn in front of most people's houses and on their golf courses. Nobody eats any of it. We either let it rot where cut it or bag it and pay to have it hauled away.
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<stuff snipped>

In the future it will be a crime to use water in that way (unless it's gray water - and maybe not even then) in many places. In certain areas, it's already some sort of infraction to water lawns when not approved. Other places will still be as green as ever, though, where water is naturally abundant.
Desalination could see some very serious technical improvements over the decades that make it much more economic than it is now. Solar evaporation could produce potable water.
http://cleantechnica.com/2014/02/18/tiny-solar-power-desalination-plant-solves-big-salt-problem/
--
Bobby G.



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wrote in message

it is already a crime in some places to catch rainwater.
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On 4/11/2016 4:23 PM, Robert Green wrote:

I live in Minnesota and all of our water comes from our well.
When I lived in Bermuda, I discovered that there is no fresh water there. The Bermudians collect rain water in large cisterns that are located under or next to their homes. All the roofs are coated in lime.
Of course, on the naval base (which isn't there any more), there was a desalination plant, but it only provided water to the base.
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On Mon, 11 Apr 2016 17:23:50 -0400, "Robert Green"

We have that here but it is a toothless law. I have never heard of anyone getting more than a nasty letter.

Potable water is not really the issue. It is water for agriculture that will be the problem. I could make enough drinking water for my family with a fairly modest R/O unit, using the tidal river next to my house. In fact the river has lower salinity than my well quite often. In January and February the river was running about 320ppm and the well cruises around 450ppm. That is closer to 900 after the water softener.
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<stuff snipped>

People will have to learn to eat kelp and seaweed like the Japanese. Then comes Soylent . . .
--
Bobby G.



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wrote:

We've hopefully learned from the Texans' experience with groundwater. Nebraska has Natural Resources Districts in place to monitor such things. There are areas where no new irrigation is permitted. Irrigation wells have water meters at least in my area. There will be rationing if groundwaters levels drop below a certain point. A farmer will be permitted to use X amount over a three year period. I betcha dollars to donuts Kansas has something similar. Different irrigation methods, crop rotation, conservation tillage, and more drought resistant crops all help. Then there is the money issue. Will that last irrigation make money? Farmers could go back to dryland farming in a worst case scenario. There's hardly any irrigation in Illinois and Iowa. They consistently raise the most corn.
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On 04/10/2016 07:23 AM, Dean Hoffman wrote:

The religious nutters won't like it but Earth needs to restrict population growth. I guess that will occur naturally when we run out of food.
Beware of the religious gun nutters! They will be stocking up on ammo to guard their tomatoes.
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Genesis 9:7 wrote:

You should probably worry more about the claymores .
--
Snag



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On 04/10/2016 09:13 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

OMG! =-O
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wrote:

I don't doubt that man has caused CO2 levels to rise but it has tracked population growth for the last 8000 years.
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In the space of one hundred and seventy-six years the Mississippi has shortened itself two hundred and forty-two miles. Therefore ... in the Old Silurian Period the Mississippi River was upward of one million three hundred thousand miles long ... seven hundred and forty-two years from now the Mississippi will be only a mile and three-quarters long. ... There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesome returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact. -- Mark Twain
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Roger Blake (Posts from Google Groups killfiled due to excess spam.)
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It will grow much more, due to scientific advances in growing techniques and corn strains.
And by then we will have stopped wasting food as an energy source.
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anyone who has ever had a aquarium for years knows that a aqurium has a carrying capacity.....
exceed it and fish die. can cause too much plant growth too.
i believe we should respect risks we dont fully understand.
thre may be a tipping point.
if excedded things will get out of control....
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