Climate change

Page 1 of 3  
(ANN Topeka) The Kansas Department of the Interior, Office of Technology released a study today on the effect of climate change on Kansas agriculture. Dr. Merrill Crawford, chairman of the committee project summarized the report and said that within the next 75 years, Kansas will no longer be able to grow the same quantify of corn that it does now. "This is unfortunate, of course, but we think we can replace much of the corn acreage with pineapple, which will do very well in the new climate."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why start a new thread? There's already one named "Global warming is our greatest threat." Don't be afraid to contribute to that one. Or are you?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gordon Shumway wrote: "- show quoted text - Why start a new thread? There's already one named "Global warming is our greatest threat." Don't be afraid to contribute to that one. Or are you? "
At least this thread is titled properly. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 9 Apr 2016 16:14:32 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

No, it's not titled "Weather."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

All I know about the place is that it's called a desert, but that really doesn't sound normal.
I wonder how much rain it takes before more plants than usual grow.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/fs117-03/
Precipitation History of the Mojave Desert Region, 1893–2001
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 09 Apr 2016 17:31:15 -0500, Gordon Shumway

I'm trembling in my boots. Or more likely, I didn't see the other thread.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I could believe your first statement. I doubt your second statement.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<stuff snipped>

I'll bet. (-:
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Kansas is 7th in corn production, producing about 1/4 as much corn as Iowa. Iowa farmers will just have to use fence stretchers to make their farms a bit bigger to make up the difference. http://alturl.com/eqcj3 or <http://beef2live.com/story-states-produce-corn-0-107129 ?? The original report wasn't dated 4/1 by chance??
--
Using Opera's mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 09 Apr 2016 17:36:04 -0500, "Dean Hoffman"

Well, maybe. ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 09 Apr 2016 17:36:15 -0400, Micky

Sounds like bullshit to me. We grow corn in Florida
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The morticians must be really busy picking up bodies of construction workers and farmers in some countries. A White House science advisor says it will be impossible to be outside at times soon due to global warming.
From CNS http://alturl.com/33cjd or <http://www.cnsnews.com/news/article/wh-science-advisor-farmers-construction-workers-will-die-climate-change Warning. CNS is one of those whacko, nut case, gun totin', kook websites. Some of them might even be Christians.
--
Using Opera's mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 10 Apr 2016 08:40:31 -0500, "Dean Hoffman"

There is a hell of a lot of construction going on in Florida and the predictions do not make it much hotter here, even in the globe does warm. The effect will be in the northern latitudes. Certainly it will affect those who can't stand to work outside when it is over 80 but they will adapt or they will be programmers. Plenty of the construction workers here came from the north although the most productive seemed to come up from the south.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| There is a hell of a lot of construction going on in Florida and the | predictions do not make it much hotter here, even in the globe does | warm. The effect will be in the northern latitudes.
Yes. Florida has other problems to worry about, like disappearing under water. Though it's hard to get a realistic idea about that. I remember reading *many* years ago that a 2" sea level rise would result in water percolating up through the soil in much of Florida, because it's not much more that a big sandbar. But isn't the rise alreay 1+"? Now the talk is of 6-40 feet sea level rise by 2100. Does Miami go the way of Atlantis with 2"? 1'? 4'? The numbers I've heard over time have been all over the place. First 2" would drown Florida. Then 6' would "be a big problem" for NYC and Boston. I'm not surprised that the global warming deniers are so stubborn: The quasi-science of global warming seems to be almost as reactive as the denier mindset. It might help if the scientists would try to stick to facts and avoid dramatic speculation.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Atlantis? old time climate change?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 10 Apr 2016 11:32:23 -0400, "Mayayana"

We are talking about what would happen in 100 years if nothing changes, either in reality or in the projections. A lot of things can happen in 100 years. Even a fairly small nuclear war would cool the planet to a point where freezing the crops in Florida would be more of a worry than an inch of sea level rise. The war might be over water.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| We are talking about what would happen in 100 years if nothing | changes, either in reality or in the projections.
No, we're talking about what's already happening.
http://www.wired.com/2015/02/rising-sea-levels-already-making-miamis-floods-worse/
| Even a fairly small nuclear war would cool the planet to a point where | freezing the crops in Florida would be more of a worry than an inch of | sea level rise.
That's a good point. I don't know about nuclear war, but a very large volcano could mean that global warming saves us rather than harming. Could, maybe. But it's more likely that South Florida and coastal Florida will become an undesirable place to live in just the next decade.
Hopefully it's not Florida logic to hope for a nuclear war to cool things off. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 10 Apr 2016 17:55:49 -0400, "Mayayana"

That is just flatland bullshit sold to people who want to believe. I have "sea level" under my boat dock in SW Florida and a pier that has not moved in 20 years. I know when sea level goes up and down with the tides and I know when it is at it's highest. There is no significant change and certainly in fractions of an inch. Do you really need me to point you to tide stage monitor data? or DAFGS

Bullshit unless you just mean the influx of yankee baby boomers.

Not at all ... but as likely as the global warming scenarios. I said before, we will run out of water long before we run out of oil or succumb to global warming although that might accelerate the water problem ... but that is still the problem. It all comes back to there are still too many people on this rock. CO2 tracks population as closely as any other metric for at least 8000 years.
War, famine, disease. The long term solution is to get us back around 2 billion people.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| I said before, we will run out of water long before we run out of oil | or succumb to global warming although that might accelerate the water | problem ... but that is still the problem.
Maybe for you. According to the Wired article your ground water is getting polluted by sea water as ocean levels rise. And there are droughts in the West. And the aquifers in the bread basket are a one-time bonus that's nearly depleted. And retirees in the Southwest have been living on bottled water for decades.
In New England it's likely to be the other way around. We have plenty of water and expect more with global warming. Our problems are more likely to be extreme species strain, as we move up one or two temperature zones. But water shouldn't be a problem. So order now before I put the price up. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.