Clearing Drains with Air Pressure

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On 01/14/2016 09:13 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I had a tree root problem, cheapest solution was to remove the tree. Roots stopped growing, problem solved.
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On Thursday, January 14, 2016 at 10:02:51 PM UTC-5, Wild Bill wrote:

It's not my tree but I wouldn't remove it even if it was. It's not always about the money or even the inconvenience.
The cheapest solution is not always the best.
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On Thu, 14 Jan 2016 19:11:03 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

I had a nice big red maple cut down - right over my sewer line - before it gave me problems. It wasn't cheap. It was the best solution. Also saved me from climbing on the roof yearly to clean the gutters. I've still got plenty of nice trees. It was a thoughtless act to plant a tree right over the sewer line 50 ago years ago, but they probably didn't know better.
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On 1/15/2016 5:54 AM, Vic Smith wrote:

I've felled all of the original trees on the property (last one we had to hire-out as a mistake would have done serious damage to any of the four homes it could fall on!) -- largely to eliminate the maintenance issues and "risks" (we have lots of microbursts in the neighborhood that easily topple 70 ft, 36" dia pines!).
I'd hoped that the last tree (pine) would result in eliminating the pine needles that accumulate on the (flat) roof. But, apparently, those that are still accumulating there are fom neighbor's trees behind us. I guess the wind carries them pretty far when they fall off from those heights!
Neighbors grumbled when I took the deciduous trees down: "Oh, the leaves were so pretty in the Fall...!" (WTF? They were just YELLOW! Not the vibrant reds and oranges from Maples, etc.) "Yeah, well I never saw any of you guys helping to rake them and *bag* them..."

We've settled on citrus (because they produce edible fruit) and "Mimosa" trees -- smallish (perhaps 15 ft tall/wide) with delightful flowers that the hummingbirds adore: <
http://spiritrisingherbs.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/mimosa-flower.jpg

No fear that they'll be toppled onto the house/car. And, I can take one down in a matter of hours -- leaving no sign of it's presence! (contrast with days/weeks/months for some of the larger trees that I felled)

We had one in our front yard like that. When I dug up the root system (removing ~20 yards of soil), I found a 6" diameter root following the clay sewer pipe *under* the house! Tricky removing it without damaging the pipe.
The mimosa planted in its place will never develop as complex/intense/deep of a root system.
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On 1/15/2016 1:22 PM, Don Y wrote:

I always recycle all the fallen leaves into mulch.

I love Mimosa trees. Had one come up volunteer in my back yard this last summer and I was able to pot it up and I'm training it as a bonsai, now. It's still growing in doors under grow lights and doing well. I hope to train it and even get it to bloom in it's miniature state, but not sure how long it'll take to get it to do that from seed.
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On 1/15/2016 12:40 PM, Muggles wrote:

We grew all of ours from seed. They grow fast (here, we have a very long growing season) -- especially if aggressively watered. I think it was less than three years to get as tall as me.
The downside is that they produce a lot of litter (seed pods). So, we remove the pods from the tree before they get a chance to "dry" (ripen?) and dispense their cargo to the coil, below.
Otherwise, you end up with *hundreds* of volunteers each season -- from each tree!
I've had very limited success trying to recover volunteers from the Texas Mountain Laurel: <
http://treefolks.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Sophora-secundiflora-for-web.jpg
fabulously fragrant flowers -- smells like grape juice as you walk to our front door! Apparently, they send a deep tap root long before much appears above the surface. And, this root is easily damaged.
So, trick is to dig down *deep* with the tiniest of volunteers and transfer to a pot. Then, after getting established, move to a permanent location in the yard. I've done this successfully twice, now. I need 2 more successes.
Downside is they take FOREVER to grow! :<
Absolutely *no* luck trying to cultivate anything off the razzleberry: <
https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/media/images/Loropetalum-chinense-v-rubrum-Razzleberri--Scott-Zona--cc-by-nc-2-0.jpg
another spectacular bloomer -- though no apparent fragrance. I suspect the plants may be sterile (?)
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On 1/15/2016 2:03 PM, Don Y wrote:

It may be a hybrid, I'm thinking. It's also called Chinese Fringe flower, at least that what it looks like. You can probably propagate it using stem cuttings, or bury some branches in the dirt with a couple of leaf nodes buried in the dirt and the rest of the branch growing above ground. Maybe treat the nodes that'll be buried with rooting hormone and keep it buried for a month or so. Roots should develop at the buried leaf nodes, and you can cut it off from the rest of the bush taking the roots and branch and replanting it.
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Maggie

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On 1/15/2016 2:31 PM, Muggles wrote:

We won't take "extraordinary measures" with these. We've tried 3 or 4 "store bought" plants to complement the ~8 ft bush we already have. None of them have fared well. So, we suspect it's a fluke that the *one* has done well at all!
Sad as it truly is an attractive plant!
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On 1/15/2016 4:50 PM, Don Y wrote:

The bush that is growing well already may be native, and the other bushes grown elsewhere. That's one idea of why the new bushes don't do well.
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Maggie

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On 1/15/2016 9:50 PM, Muggles wrote:

No. I planted it.
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On 1/15/2016 11:06 PM, Don Y wrote:

Well ... the other bushes just didn't like you then, I guess. :)
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Maggie

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On Thursday, January 14, 2016 at 9:13:33 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

if you use hot water the steam containing salt kills all the roots.
our main sewer line has roots in all clay pipe joints but one......
this has been my solution for near 20 years
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On Thu, 14 Jan 2016 18:13:27 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

If you can identify the spot within a few feet, fixing it should not be that expensive. A few hours of a machine, a pipe cutter, a couple of no hub fittings and some pipe.
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On Thu, 14 Jan 2016 23:02:59 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Up north where there's a frost line it not that easy. My sewer lines in a suburb of Chicago are about 7-8' deep. And you don't need a pipe cutter. Clay pipe. Just a hammer. And a trencher capable of going 8' deep. And plenty of men and shovels. Probably cost 10-15 grand to replace the pipe from my house to the city sewer line, about 60' feet.
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On Friday, January 15, 2016 at 8:37:51 AM UTC-5, Vic Smith wrote:

In addition to the frost line issue, in my case the gas service and water main are all in that same "line". They all enter/leave the house in the same corner. The gas service is on top, then the water main, then the sewer pipe. Any digging done with a machine could be hazardous, especially if done by a rookie (me). The gas service is less than 3 years old, but the water main may be original. It's just not something I would feel comfortable disturbing.
We might as well toss in the landscaping that would need to be done, etc.
$5K to have someone line the pipe for me, and give me a warranty, seems like the better option in this case. For now, I'll stick with the Root-X since it's really easy to apply via the clean-out and has worked for the past few years.
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On Thursday, January 14, 2016 at 4:55:13 PM UTC-5, Don Y wrote:

ahh to clear tree roots just mix rock salt or softener salt in very hot water, and that kills tree roots fast, but doesnt harm the trees
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issue of

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hot water, and that kills tree roots fast, but doesnt harm the trees
I remember years ago hearing that copper sulfate was good for killing roots, but never tried it. No root problems here yet.
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That would be step one in any drain cleaning operation anyway. Why complicate the process with a bunch of parts that are this easy to remove. You might find your problem before you even get to the wall. You can usually get to the trunk line with a closet auger once you get to the wall stub.
Drop all of those parts in a bucket of water with a splash of bleach and they will look like new overnight.
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In wrote:

You are probably right about that. I just looked at the problem bathroom sink again this morning. It has a 1 1/4 inch metal P trap that goes into the wall, then a 90 down to below the floor, then a 90 and across the ceiling (above the ceiling, below the floor -- I have the ceiling below opened up) to the main 4-inch cast iron sewer line where the toilet ties in. It's about a 7 foot horizontal run of a narrow lead pipe drain line with almost no pirch to it.
The "clog" or partial obstruction always appears to be near the end of the narrow lead pipe run down close to, or at, the place where it meets the toilet sewer line. It is a chronic slow draining problem that recurs a month or two after snaking out the line. Other evidence that the clog is near the end of the line is that it takes awhile of running water into the sink before the water starts to back up into the sink. So, I think the whole pipe etc. has to fill up before it backs up into the sink -- meaning the clog is not right at or near the sink.
After looking at it this morning, I think that I may decide to cut the horizontal part of the P trap and put a Fernco there. Then, to snake out the line, I will disconnect the Fernco and put the drain snake in and it will only have to make two 90 degree turns to get all the way to the end of the line.
While looking at what is there now, and thinking about the water pressure device that others mentioned, I started thinking that I could invent a fitting that attaches to a hose on one end and the other end of the fitting would screw tightly onto the P trap up underneath where the curved part of the P attaches to the horizontal piece. It would be a specifically designed fitting -- maybe in two sizes -- one for 1 1/4 drain lines and one for 1 1/2 drain lines.
But, then my alarm clock went off and I woke up, and the dream was over.
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If you do any cutting into that pipe at all, I would suggest increasing the pitch. Shorten the vertical at the sink end. You could replace the 90 with a sanitary tee and create a cleanout but with better pitch, you might never need it.
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