Cleaning Up a Broken CFL

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On 03/14/2014 11:26 AM, philo wrote:

None repeat NONE have ever failed.
Nothing like running them on 80 volts, nice warm , orange glow...and the bulbs last for years
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On 03/14/2014 11:26 AM, philo wrote:

None repeat NONE have ever failed.
Nothing like running them on 80 volts, nice warm , orange glow...and the bulbs last for years
--
Why would you do that? Can you not afford your beloved CFLs?


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On 03/15/2014 04:12 AM, BurfordTJustice wrote:

The only way to get a light bulb to last 20 years is to regularly change the vacuum inside. Most people are negligent with regards to the proper maintenance of a light bulb.
Not draining the old vacuum and putting in a new, fresh vacuum is like never changing the oil on your car.
It's nice to see intelligent people here like Buford who does things right.
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1243138/Still-glowing-strong-109-years-worlds-oldest-lightbulb.html
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On 03/15/2014 05:27 AM, BurfordTJustice wrote:

That article is total BS
I read about it ten years ago and it was only 99 years old
sheesh!
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On 03/15/2014 06:27 AM, BurfordTJustice wrote:

Is that bulb UL listed? What would happen if the place burned down because of that illegal bulb? Would the insurance company refuse to pay the claim?
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On 3/15/2014 6:25 AM, philo wrote:

The really old light bulbs had an indicator that changed color when the vacuum was getting low. And, the filaments had to be retungstinated.
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Christopher A. Young
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On 03/15/2014 06:53 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

yep...here is a photo of my test instrument:
https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc3/t31/10005783_787672904593414_421786576_o.jpg
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| > The drawback to Halogen is the heat. | | And they don't like being dimmed. |
I've never found that. Dimmers are bad for CFL, unless you get a CFL specifically designed for it. I've never seen a halogen bulb affected by dimmers. I have them in sconces in one room that gets an average of probably 2-3 hours use daily. They haven't been replaced since the room was renovated about 12 years ago. Another room gets used a bit more -- typically 3-4 hours daily -- and has 3 track lights. Those lights are 5-6 years old and still haven't been replaced. The kitchen has a sconce with the light left on from dark to bedtime. That bulb seems to go about every 3 years. All are always on dimmers and rarely set to full power.
The heat issue *is* relevant. I wouldn't use halogens in recessed lighting, or in any other fixture that's not spaced away from the wall or ceiling. (Cracked insulation on wires resulting from heat caused by ceiling-mounted lights is a big problem in old houses.)
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On 03/15/2014 08:29 AM, Mayayana wrote:

So a 100 watt halogen puts out more BTUs than a regular 100 watt incandescent bulb?
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| On 03/15/2014 08:29 AM, Mayayana wrote: | > The heat issue*is* relevant. I wouldn't use halogens in | > recessed lighting, or in any other fixture that's not spaced | > away from the wall or ceiling. | | So a 100 watt halogen puts out more BTUs than a regular 100 watt incandescent bulb?
Generally the halogen would be lower wattage, but they do seem to be much hotter. I don't have figures on it.
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On 03/15/2014 07:16 PM, Mayayana wrote:

Both halogen and regular incandescent 100 watt bulbs would output 341 BTU/hr.
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On 3/15/2014 8:07 PM, Stormin 0ren wrote:

Might be higher temperature?
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| >> | So a 100 watt halogen puts out more BTUs than a regular 100 watt | >> incandescent bulb? | >> | >> Generally the halogen would be lower wattage, but | >> they do seem to be much hotter. I don't have figures | >> on it. | >> | >> | > | > Both halogen and regular incandescent 100 watt bulbs would output 341 | > BTU/hr. | | Might be higher temperature? |
It's misleading terminology. Watts and BTUs are both just measures of energy. BTUs are often used to express heat output, but a BTU is actually just a measure of energy. He's just translating one term to the other. It doesn't measure heat output, or light output for that matter, just as a toaster doesn't put out the same heat or light as a ceiling fan/light fixture at the same power draw.
Here's a quote from Wikipedia:
"Halogen lamps get hotter than regular incandescent lamps because the heat is concentrated on a smaller envelope surface, and because the surface is closer to the filament. This high temperature is essential to their operation. Because the halogen lamp operates at very high temperatures, it can pose fire and burn hazards. In Australia, numerous house fires each year are attributed to ceiling-mounted halogen downlights."
Halogen bulbs seem to be notably more efficient than tradition incandescent. The 100w equivalents I use are 72w, for example. But that's just efficiency in converting energy to light. There's still 90%+- energy that's wasted, presumably as heat. So a halogen bulb might actually produce slightly less heat than a traditional incandescent bulb, but they're tiny by comparison. I remember when they first came out there were a lot of problems with fires because "floor sconces" were popular at the time -- 5'-6' high standing lamps with a halogen bulb, pointing at the ceiling. There were cases where curtains touched the bulbs and quickly lit on fire.
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wrote:

This is correct but misleading. Quartz halogen run at a higher temperature. If you notice regular incandescent bulbs turn black as they age. This is due to the tungsten evaporating and depositing on the inside of the bulb. This evaporation limits the filament temperature, and thus the efficiency of the bulb. Quartz halogen run at higher temperatures and the halogen scavenges the tungsten from the inside of the bulb and re-deposits on the filament. A dimmer can be used but the bulb does not get hot enough for the halogen to work and the life of the bulb will decrease. Quartz is used for the bulb because it can withstand higher temperatures than glass.
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Odd, my under the cabinet halogens never complained.
Plus, the dimmer works perfectly.
--
Dan Espen

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On 3/14/2014 9:00 AM, Mayayana wrote:

For the record, halogen bulbs _are_ incandescent. i.e. they heat a resistive filament with electrical current causing it to glow. They simply change the materials and design a bit to survive operating at a higher temperature where 'normal' incandescent bulbs would rapidly fail.
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| > Recently I needed to find a replacement for 100w work lights | > and found a very nice solution: There are now bulbs that | > look like incandescent and fit like incandescent, but with a | > small halogen bulb inside instead of a filament. | | For the record, halogen bulbs _are_ incandescent. i.e. they heat a | resistive filament with electrical current causing it to glow.
OK. What I meant was that they're now making bulbs the same size and threads as traditional incandescent, but if you look inside you can see that they've actually mounted a small halogen bulb inside, glass and all. In other words, the bulb is actually an adaptor for a halogen bulb.
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On 3/14/2014 6:26 AM, BurfordTJustice wrote:

Ridiculous. I just tossed one that burnt out in my kitchen. GE replacement is a real hummer. You get used to it but when wife turned it on yesterday, not knowing that I had put new CFL bulb in, she went out to check our new smoke alarms wondering if it were them.
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