Cleaning Piano Keys

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Does anyone know how to remove Crayola Invisible Marker from ivory piano keys? Warm soapy water didn't work. Thanks
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When you called Crayola, they couldn't offer a solution? That's surprising. It seems other people must've run into similar problems before.
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If they're invisible, how do you know they are there?
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Use a Mr. Clean Magic Eraser. They are wonderful things!
Cheri
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On Wed, 7 Jul 2010 15:00:17 -0400, "Michael"

Try bleach. Test a small area first to see how it reacts. I use it diluted by 50% on kitchen counters and full strenght in the toilet bowl. Does wonders for stains at least for me.
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Jeff The Drunk wrote:

Bleach will disolve ivory.
try an alcohol-soaked cotton swab or rag
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On 07/07/2010 07:41 PM, zaax wrote:

If it's only a couple keys, a good piano tuner should have some replacements in his truck. However, unless he is older than Methuselah, he likely won't have real ivory ones. My parents salvaged a nice old upright piano years ago and a couple of the keys always bothered me because most of them were ivory, but a couple that had gotten damaged or missing over the years had plastic on them.
The good news is that they are as far as I know a dead standard size, so if it *is* only a couple of them, and they *are* plastic and not real ivory, and it's only a couple of them, next time you have the piano tuned ask the tuner to replace those caps for you and you will be good to go.
Now had I managed to draw on real ivory keys with anything more permanent than a No. 2 pencil... well... I got grounded enough as a kid, I didn't need a spanking as well.
good luck
nate
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wrote:

Permanent marker comes off of almost anything with "expo whiteboard cleaner" - and cleaning ivory keys (to get them "white" again) - my piano tuner said to use lemon juice when I rebuilt my old upright grand.
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Earl Proulx (the Yankee home handyman) I think said yoghurt. American Yankee,eh?
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On Wed 07 Jul 2010 06:58:17p, told us...

u You might also try 20 volume hydrogen peroxide. It won't harm any material, ivory or plastic, and may very well remove the stain.
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I would try a pressure washer.
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On Wed, 7 Jul 2010 13:33:24 -0700 (PDT), Ron

Gas or electric?
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On Jul 7, 4:58pm, Jeff The Drunk wrote:

Either.
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On Wed, 7 Jul 2010 14:02:32 -0700 (PDT), Ron

Ok I have an industrial pressure washer run off a Kuboto diesel. Develops about 10000 psi at the tip. No doubt that would do the job huh?
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Either will put you to sleep.
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Gas. You need at least 3,000 PSI.
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As I'm sure you know, ivory is pretty delicate when it comes to cleaning. Try white toothpaste on a soft, damp cloth, carefully. I've heard of people using Bon Ami, but I'd double that "carefully" if trying that. Also, they can be professionally cleaned, if it comes to that.
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On 7/7/2010 2:07 PM Jo Ann spake thus:
>

Even though the O.P. said "ivory", most piano keys (white keys) aren't actually ivory any more. Endangered species and all that. They're most likely some form of "ivoroid", an ivory-looking plastic, unless it's an antique Steinway or something.
Actually, ivory is probably less "delicate" than plastic when it comes to cleaning. It's not going to melt away with solvents like acetone like most plastics will. It's also harder and will resist scratching better.
Common sense dictates avoiding any kind of abrasive cleaner, which would rule out Bon Ami. Since the markers may be solvent-based, I'd suggest the following, carefully and sparingly applied with a cotton swab:
o Paint thinner or naphtha (*not* acetone or lacquer thinner!) o A strong soap, like concentrated Simple Green, dish soap or equivalent o Denatured alcohol
Test a small patch, perhaps on an end key, to make sure it doesn't stain the keys.
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On Wed, 07 Jul 2010 15:34:02 -0700, David Nebenzahl

Yes, ivory is porous. That is why you don't want to use ANY liquids or solvents in amounts that might soak through and disolve glues, or warp wood beneath the ivory. The ivory, if that is what it is, is not very thick. CAUTION
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For something like this I'd start with the most gentle technique then get more agressive if the stain persists.
First try a poultice of baking soda and water for 24 hours under saran wrap.
If no success then try making a poultice out of baking soda and peroxide or diatomacious earth and peroxide (12% solution) to the consistency of peanut butter.
If no luck try mineral spirits on a WHITE paper towel under saran wrap for 24 hours.
If no luck try same with acetone.
For all of the above put a 1/4 inch thick pile of (either WHITE paper towel or baking soda medium or diatomacious earth medium) over the key then seal it with saran wrap to prevent evaporation, let it sit 24 hours, if you are lucky it will leach the stain out of the ivory. If the stain did not disappear fully, but did disappear a little, then repeat.
I'd try bleach last though.
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