Cleaning pc

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On 2/27/2012 6:09 AM, Notat Home wrote:

There are a bunch of issues that probably aren't harmful in a typical circumstance...probably... but why take the chance.
Static electricity: Be careful what you touch when you're in there. High speed air flow can generate static electricity. I'd not use plastic nozzle from the air source. You don't know what they're made of. At least use a metal nozzle that you hold on to. Keep the pressure low.
This link talks about CO2, but may apply to canned air, which actually contains no air at all. http://www.santa.com.tr/YONERGE/EIGA-NL-7602-E.pdf
Air compressor tanks collect water. And that water dissolves whatever it comes into contact with. Even clean water dissolves whatever is on the board when it hits it. You really don't want any water.
Resist the temptation to spin the fans up to 100,000 RPM. It can't be good for the bearings.
Be careful around electromechanical devices with exposed delicate parts. Floppy drives. CD drives are pretty robust, but 100PSI is powerful.
I've been using an air compressor (carefully) for decades with no incident.
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<stuff snipped>

Good point. If you hear them rev up and start whining like a New Year's Eve noisemaker then you've probably damaged the bearings. I've unfortunately had more than one PC fan fail right after a thorough cleaning. They should not be running during a cleaning. Vic's solution to use soft brushes is a good one. I've come across CPU heatsinks that were completely blocked off with pet hair. Floor mounted machines are particular susceptible to "hair blocks."
-- Bobby G.
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I used to use the compressed air approach but now I use a leaf blower. Unhook everything, take off the side panels, and take outside and blow everything out of all the nooks and crannies. It works great, and no, I've never had a CPU fan go bad from overspeeding but I don't leave the airstream on it for a long time either.
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My backpack leaf blower would blow a PC over.
--
Dan Espen

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Compressed air can make a dusty, grimy computer look like brand new again.
I know computer pro's who regularly clean out computers with shop compressed air. I've done it myself for years. I've never known it to cause a problem. It often lowers the CPU temperature substantially once the heat sink isn't covered in fluff.
Just hold the fan blades so they don't spin up to supersonic speeds.
:)
Ross
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Be careful when blowing compressed air near small cooling fans. I've had them fail soon after a blowout because dust got forced into the bearings. I usually open a window, put a fan in it exhausting the air from the room and then blow out the PC so that all the dust gets sucked out the window.
-- Bobby G.
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I use the compressor (and some common sense) all the time.
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"Notat Home" wrote in message
One of my pc's has a health check program, which supposedly checks the pc for problems. The last time it ran, it gave me a message that the pc should periodically be cleaned. I've been doing this with a vacuum, but they suggested a can of compressed air. Cans of compressed air are surprisingly expensive, so I started thinking of using my air compressor, or a politician.
Would an air compressor work? I'm wondering if I can set it low enough to insure the computer is not harmed.
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I worked at a PC repair shop for years. We always used a compressor and ALWAYS used a moisture trap in the air line (cheap!) to clean almost every computer that came into the shop. Also as you mention, be a little careful with extreme high pressure but we used pressure much higher than comes out of a can. ALWAYS hold the fan blades still with fingers, pencil, etc. to keep them from spinning too fast. They are usually cheap plastic and can break blades easily. I have heard that spinning the fans backwards from their normal direction can create a possibly dangerous "reverse" current. I don't know about this but holding the fans still solves that problem too.
Moisture, dirt and heat are the enemy of electronics. A careful, frequent, cleaning can save big expenses. When parts get dirty and quit cooling, it is the motherboard or processor that usually suffers... most expensive parts and often not replaceable after a few years.
How often? maybe once a month, maybe once every couple of years... just look at filters, fan blade edges, cooling vents and cooling fins.
No moisture trap? Empty water from air tank (valve at bottom) and spray air on a piece of paper or wood.... depending on local humidity, you may or may not see much moisture. Then its your call... After cleaning, let the computer sit a few hours or overnight in a dry (air conditioned or heated) atmosphere before starting.
Moisture trap or not, if you see mist being blown into computer, dry it (as above) for a few hours before starting.
-- -- Les Stewart Nacogdoches, TX s t e w a r t 5 4 3 2 1 @ g m a i l . c o m (remove spaces)
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