Cleaning paint-roller pans

Two words: Pressure washer.
You may recall I used a pressure washer on some interior walls(!).
Well, the walls are painted; now it's time to clean up. Since the pressure washer was still sitting on the walkway, well, why not?
Done it three minutes!
It used to take me twenty minutes or more to clean a roller pan in the sink. Now the job is over before I can recite the Gettysburg Address! Plus, the clean-up is almost enjoyable.
(I didn't try the rollers - they went in the trash.)
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On 4/8/2012 9:09 PM, HeyBub wrote:

I use plastic shopping bags as paint tray liners. Makes cleaning up a snap. Have also used those prewashed salad bins as handy disposable paint trays for smaller rollers.
As for rollers, for latex paints I use microfibre rollers now. Easy to wash with cold water.
Pressure washer is a unique idea but I dunno if I'd wanna set-up all up for 2 or 3 minutes cleanings.
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wrote:

Wow, I never could justify a pressure washer, but this is making me re-evaluate that position.
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Where do you do this? Where does the paint/water mix go?
--
Dan Espen

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Dan Espen wrote:

The lawn, where I hope it will kill the weeds.
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Bob F wrote:

I went to a painting seminar at the local Home Show. The seminar instructor advocated a "paint brush spinner". Here's one that also holds rollers:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)33970577&sr=1-1
His tips for cleaning up after latex paint included the following magic ingredient:
Fabric Softener.
For cleaning oil-based tools: 1. A couple of dips (and spins) in paint thinner, followed by... 2. A similar attack with a 50-50 mix of paint thinner and alcohol, followed by... 3. A final attack with 100% alcohol.
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+1 to that. Just picked up some for 75c a piece. No fuss, no muss. I also have one of the smaller paint cans with a strap you can hold in your hand and they have liners for that too.
Anyone have tips for how to get any latex paint off brushes after some of it has hardened? Most of it comes right off, but at the end of the day, there is that stubborn line higher up on the brush where it has partially dried.
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wrote:

Easy Off brand of window cleaner. Now GONE from the market!
Simply spray and wipe, line disappeared.
I've tried several other brands, nothing the same. But, Walmart brand in mechanical pump comes close.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

1. Alcohol
2. Paint remover
--

dadiOH
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In article
[snip]

Use a wire brush and brush down the bristles.
--
charles

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On Mon, 09 Apr 2012 18:08:42 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (Charles Bishop) wrote:

Yup. Only way after it dries. The best way is to avoid it in the first place. I always tried to wash my brushes out when they got loaded up near the handle, or clean them with spirits if using oil. Even if the job wasn't done yet. Didn't always work out, but usually did. Once the paint dries on the bristles, a wire brush is the only way I could get it out. You might lose some bristles.
--Vic
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Vic Smith wrote:

Yep.
Painting tip I heard at the local Home & Garden show was to use TWO brushes. When one got loaded up, dunk it in a pail of water (with fabric softener) and move to brush #2.
When brush #2 gets loaded, exchange it for brush #1. Rinse #1 back to pristine condition and you're good to go.
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When I was painting, I usually used a 5 gallon bucket with a screen. If I used roller pans, I got the plastic liners and put them in the metal pan. Once any left over paint dried, they could be reused a few times before I threw them away. At $.50 for a liner, it saved a lot of tilme.
For rollers, I'd put them in a bucket of warm water and soap and let them bounce around in the bed of my truck on the way home. Rinse them out a bit, then throw all of them (usually 4+ on a job, in the washing machine to get the remained of the paint out. Let them air dry.
If you're painting over several days, don't clean the roller covers each day, but wrap them in plastic, label the color and store. Over a period of days, they can go in the freezer.
--
chalres

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Charles Bishop wrote:

Oooo! Really good idea about the washing machine!
I routinely put my mop head in the washer, but never considered rollers.
Why not expand the concept to brushes?
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Shhhhhh.
--
charles

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Bob F wrote:

Women are strange creatures. Mine insists on washing coffee cups.
I don't know why.
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