Cleaning mold off of concrete basement floor

I recently put down peel and press tile on a section of my basement.....big mistake. There is just too much moisture in the basement. The tiles are loose and there is black mold. I'm going to lift up the tiles and toss them. What should i use to clean the concrete. I seem to recall that bleach is good to kill mold.
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An email friend of mine was sickened by black mold. Put him in the hospital, and messed up the rest of his life. I'd do some internet research, and be careful. You may be wise to buy a respirator. Serious risk, there.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I recently put down peel and press tile on a section of my basement.....big mistake. There is just too much moisture in the basement. The tiles are loose and there is black mold. I'm going to lift up the tiles and toss them. What should i use to clean the concrete. I seem to recall that bleach is good to kill mold.
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On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 22:50:59 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

solution. Then rinse it well and dry it quickly.
Had a basement in a townhouse that had a foundation crack - the former tennants had shelves all around filled with fishing and camping gear. When it was cleared out there was black mold over everything.
I took a hose-end sprayer and filled it with bleach and hosed down the entire basement - including the floor joists and subfloor above. We let it sit for about half an hour and went in and did it again. Half an hour later the garden hose rinsed it down, and there was no sign of mold left. Fans and dehumidifier dried it out, and there has not been a problem since. We DID get the foundation leak repaired.
2 years later the basement was finished - after confirming there were no more leaks and the basement was mold free.
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On Sunday, August 19, 2012 10:38:25 PM UTC-4, (unknown) wrote:

I plan on using a HEPA Air filter to clean the air while I wash the floor with bleach. I'm wondering if i should pain t the floor afterward to help seal it.
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On Aug 19, 10:36 pm, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

If you have moisture, it will just lift the paint up/off the floor in a big bubble. Fix the source of the moisture
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Right. Might need a sump pump and well.
Bleach will do a good job eating the mold. Bleach would also work it's way into concrete, but it's not recommended for wood. Vinegar kill most mold. I like a product called odoban. It works but smells good. Chlorine fumes are good to kill airborn mold and will help clean walls etc. Alternately, chlorite fumes are usually used for this purpose. It's first required to get of the moisture.
It would be difficult to do a whole basement with chlorine and survive. Kill it with odoban then scrub it off with soap. Dry dry dry.
Greg
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snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

Google "don't use bleach on mold" if you want to hear the other side of the debate. Bleach seems to be widely advocated, and widely disparaged as well.
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On Aug 19, 7:38 pm, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

Black mold is DANGEROUS! However, I believe that famous black mold is 'green' in color. Go figure. But mold can be an hallucigenic, so be careful.
From experience. Bleach kills, destroys, dissolves mold. BUT! it outgasses as it works. Which means chlorine gas is generated during the cleaning process.
Mold is insidious once it grows. It sends down mycelium into the structure which even bleach can't always touch. So, it's like, if you have mold once, you got it the rest of your life, UNLESS you remove all the material. I'll bet if you clean the mold out, it'll be back with a vengeance next month.
You'll probably find that since the heavy contamination in your basement, you now have bread and/or vegetables molding faster. Those spores go EVERYWHERE!
Back to your main problem, visible mold. Clean WITH bleach. Keep everything super dry. Use anti-fungal and solve the dampness problem.
What is the life of mold spores? Ten years? Take that long of being dry and clean before everything is dead. ...mold that is.
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On Mon, 20 Aug 2012 09:38:56 -0700 (PDT), Robert Macy

mistake. There is just too much moisture in the basement.  The tiles are loose and there is black mold. I'm going to lift up the tiles and toss them. What should i use to clean the concrete. I seem to recall that bleach is good to kill mold.

*UNLESS* you solve the water problem. Fix the problem and the symptoms will magically go away. ;-)

Use *lots* of ventilation when using the bleach.

I don't think you can get it dry enough. Didn't they find active yeast in Egyptian beer making vessels?
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On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 19:38:25 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

mistake. There is just too much moisture in the basement. The tiles are loose and there is black mold. I'm going to lift up the tiles and toss them. What should i use to clean the concrete. I seem to recall that bleach is good to kill mold. Mix 1/3 bleach and 2/3 water in a garden sprayer. Spray on floor. Rinse off after 20 minutes. (I sometimes just let it dry on its own) Ventilate well.
It would appear the cement has no vapor barrier underneath, or it has failed. The tiles are now the vapor barrier and moisture wicking up has caused them to lift.
Prior to the tiles, the moisture wicking up would have been been absorbed by the ambient air and not noticed.
To check for a vapor barrier, tape a 2' square piece of polyurethane to the cement. If you can see moisture forming on the underside of the poly within 48 hours, there is no vapor barrier. An easier way is to fill a large garbage bag with clothes/towels and leave it sit on the cement for two days. It should remain dry underneath.
There is litle that can be done in terms of fixing the root problem of a missing vapor barrier. You could ask a flooring professional about installing someting over the cement to act as a vapor barrier; for example, seam free lino with waterproof glue. Ceramic tiles may be an option if they are the porous type.
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On Mon, 20 Aug 2012 18:55:49 -0700, G Mulcaster

mistake. There is just too much moisture in the basement. The tiles are loose and there is black mold. I'm going to lift up the tiles and toss them. What should i use to clean the concrete. I seem to recall that bleach is good to kill mold.

insulation . You just need good drainage underneath.
Adding a Dri_core subfloor is the simple and effective way to put down a tile floor (or vinyl, or carpet) on a concrete floor.
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On Mon, 20 Aug 2012 22:23:07 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

mistake. There is just too much moisture in the basement. The tiles are loose and there is black mold. I'm going to lift up the tiles and toss them. What should i use to clean the concrete. I seem to recall that bleach is good to kill mold.

In the Midwest vapor barriers are normal under concrete floors. My parent's house had it under the house they had built in '59. It's not new.

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There was no vapor barrier in homes around here. Mine is 1953. Sand underneath. It was up to the builder to provide proper drainage. They didn't even use barriers on cinderblock up against dirt. If the water table comes up, you will have water seepage. Many people install aftermath French drains and pumps. I'm fine pretty much. I can see old remnants of paint still on my floor, most of it gone. Moisture will come through cement. Currently going to install rugs and flooring, on top of marine foam insulation, with top layer of strand board. All foam taped and sealed for moisture seepage. My basement floor is not wet, else I would install pumps.
Greg
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wrote:

the outside of block walls for drainage. Same stuff as on the back of DriCore. And cheaper than dricore. We put 14mm bamboo interlock flooring directly on the waffle, without sheathing .
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I don't know what it is, but not only water barriers, but radon barriers are needed here. The only thing, they used to tar the wall, which didn't last very long, I still don't think they use anything here. They need to.
Greg
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Doesn't the lack of vapor barrier indicate a potential buildup of radon gas, too?
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On Tue, 21 Aug 2012 08:48:49 -0700 (PDT), Robert Macy

mistake. There is just too much moisture in the basement. Β The tiles are loose and there is black mold. I'm going to lift up the tiles and toss them. What should i use to clean the concrete. I seem to recall that bleach is good to kill mold.

Ontario (or South-western-depending how you look at it) but we are not sitting on Granite. We have limestone, which reduces the risk substantially. Bancroft is a different story.
But then the whole question of whether radon IS an issue is still totally up in the air.
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I guess it's in line with second hand smoke, except you can't smell it, although the acceptable radon level is equivalent with smoking 5 cigarettes a day.
Greg
Greg
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wrote:

Other authorities dissagree. The data the EPA uses is old data based on uranium miners who smoked, working in a dirty hole of a uranium mine in the fifties.
More recent studies in Finland pretty well debunk the american study.
Also see: http://www.forensic-applications.com/radon/radon.html and : http://articles.mcall.com/1988-09-21/news/2644288_1_radon-levels-lung-cancer-cancer-rates and even http://phys.org/news125672761.html - which shows low levels of radon actually REDUCE the insidence of lung cancer.
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