Cleaning electrical switch.

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Maybe Tom didn't, but this guy did, and that is what I was responding to
David - who was cleaning and NOT GREASING tuner and potentiometer contacts probably a long time before Tom was born
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Gideon wrote:

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My post was about people who 'feel' rather than first learn facts. For some reason, Red Cloud has decided to use himself as a perfect example. He immediately 'feels' I was discussing dielectrics. Of course I was not. But then he knows because he 'feels' that is what I must have been thinking. So why does Red Cloud do this? Just another name and reason to insult others. His name?
Red Cloud posted using numerous names including BinaryBillTheSailor@Sea++.com, Ekal Bnek, MaximumSmoke, and Dubya snipped-for-privacy@groundfault.com. One poster even speculates that BinaryBill also posted using the name Ken Blake. He has been accused by Sirius, VWWall, Thor, etc of using pseudo names. In a discussion entitled "Computer Fire Starts Flame War" in alt.computer, others bluntly ask him (whoever he really is) what his alter egos would think. Previous posts by BinaryBill - now Red Cloud - of insults are cited in that alt.computer discussion at: http://tinyurl.com/bjk8e
He even claimed to work with Grace Hopper on the original computer called Eniac in the 1940s. Therefore he must know something... about twisting the truth.
"Red Cloud" wrote:

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Okay, then, w_tom, please show me, and everyone else, where you specified what type of grease should be used in a switch, and it's characteristics. You can't.
You have a very long and colorful history in usenet of posting lengthy technical answers that contain enough true information to make them seem believable, but then you go further and add stuff that is completely and scientifically unsupportable.
You have used this technique for years to post advice, which if followed, could easily cause injury or death. I'm far from being the only one to point this out. Due to the danger of your posts, I've collected a few over the years, including responses of other very knowlegeable and sane people showing why you are so dangerous. Shall I start posting a few of them?
So, where did you say what kind of grease to use? I'll be waiting, troll.
rusty redcloud
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In alt.home.repair on Sun, 22 May 2005 22:39:37 GMT Red Cloud® <

Well, I'm sorry to have started something that led to a fight.
My understanding of wtom's first post was that it was just meant to contrdadict the poster before him who said that grease was bad. I don't think wtom recommended any specific good grease, but I also don't think he said any old grease would be all right.
And there was no need for wtom to suggest a grease, because 5 hours earlier in the same subthread, Joseph had suggested a conductive grease from the autoparts store.
Meirman -- If emailing, please let me know whether or not you are posting the same letter. Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
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You obviously DO NOT want a "conductive" grease in the switch.... it would obviously short it all out... a standard silicon or petroleum grease works great to lube the contact and helps it from oxidizing and pitting. The higher amp rating of the switch, the heavier contact pressure, the heavier the grease. electricitym . .
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In alt.home.repair on 22 May 2005 18:53:54 -0700 snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com posted:

My gosh, you're right. I might have thought of this when I was reading the label. Thanks.

Meirman -- If emailing, please let me know whether or not you are posting the same letter. Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
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In alt.home.repair on Sun, 22 May 2005 22:14:07 -0400 meirman

But I might not have, of course. I was just trying not to feel too stupid. :)

Meirman -- If emailing, please let me know whether or not you are posting the same letter. Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
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Meirman wrote:

You did nothing to start a fight. BinaryBill - this time as Red Cloud - is doing what he does routinely. When he does not have facts, then he posts insults. There is no fight. There is just BinaryBill again posting insults. He has a bruised ego having been repeatedly challenged to provide facts after claiming to have worked "with Grace Hopper on the original computer called Eniac in the 1940s" and claiming a spike is a DC voltage.
My first post was to remind quietguy that George E. Cawthon had posted one day previous the technical reasons for grease:

George first learned science instead of speculating. That was the point. One should first learn science rather than just speculate using "old wive" techniques. A second point: those who only post insults, never post numbers, and use numerous aliases do not demonstrate technical knowledge ... even if he did work with Grace Hopper on the Eniac. Meirman need not apologize for fictions and insults from BinaryBill - a.k.a. Red Cloud.
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Okay, then, w_tom, please show me, and everyone else, where you specified what type of grease should be used in a switch, and it's characteristics. You can't.
You have a very long and colorful history in usenet of posting lengthy technical answers that contain enough true information to make them seem believable, but then you go further and add stuff that is completely and scientifically unsupportable.
You have used this technique for years to post advice, which if followed, could easily cause injury or death. I'm far from being the only one to point this out. Due to the danger of your posts, I've collected a few over the years, including responses of other very knowlegeable and sane people showing why you are so dangerous. Shall I start posting a few of them?
So, where did you say what kind of grease to use? I'm still waiting, troll.
rusty redcloud
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In alt.home.repair on Mon, 23 May 2005 16:41:02 GMT Red Cloud©

Didn't you read my last post in this subthread. He didn't claim to specify a grease, and there was no need for him to specify one.

This is a very busy group and I certainly don't read all of it, but he didn't do what you describe in this thread.

I'll be careful.

Meirman -- If emailing, please let me know whether or not you are posting the same letter. Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
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Bit of a rave on there w_tom - don't get your knickers in such a knot, especially when you are wrong.
While you would be correct if one was specifying electrical contact grease, the post I responded to simply stated grease - and to most people that means ordinary grease like one uses to grease wheel bearings etc etc. Not the sort of crap to put in a switch
So, before spouting off, next time Tom have a look at the post that is being responded to before you start 'feeling' like posting silly stuff
David
w_tom wrote:

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The topic is about switch contacts. Problem involving switch contacts are different from problems inside a potentiometer. Why? 1) Voltage and current levels are radically different. 2) Switches (unlike potentiometers) involve sharp continuity changes. Neither problem applies to potentiometers. Clearing or greasing a potentiometer has nothing to do with arcing, contact bouncing, and other power switch problems. Please don't change the topic to something completely irrelevant.
You said "grease on the switch contacts is NOT a good thing" You posted inaccurately even after others posted otherwise. That grease in sufficient quantity is a good thing - in direct contradiction to what quietguy posted. Others already noted that grease on switch contacts is a good thing. Please just admit the mistake rather confusing the issue with a potentiometer. Your reference to potentiometer only serves to confuse people rather than admit to your mistake.
quietguy wrote:

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look under the hood on right side the is a resi block in the firewall, unplug remove two screws pull unit from fire wall.see if one of them is smoked fried burnt. new block at dealer about 10.00 dollars!!! stan

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The OP has already said he's tested the switch and found that position #2 isn't functional (continuous), while the others are. I'd say it's likely the guy knows how to use a meter, and therefore it's the grungy contacts (and maybe degraded spring force) that are to blame.
I had an identical problem with a Volkswagen fan switch. I found the contacts all green & crumbly from corrosion. I cleaned the contacts using Flitz, sprayed it down with contact cleaner (Chem-clean, I think) and reinstalled it. It worked fine from then on, for about 8 years.
I'd say avoid any lubricant at all. Just polish the contact areas & reassemble.

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come on now..... if there wasn't supposed to be grease in there, why would the manufacturer put it in there to start with. Even in low amperage switches like "mode switches" in VCR's they put grease in there to not only reduce the friction and wear but to keet the contacts from oxidizing..... put grease in there for sure.... even a heavier general purpose grease would be just fine for the higher amperage and heavier contact spring tension switch like in the heater fan switch. If you run it dry, you will lose the switch in a much shorter time. electricitym . .
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Maybe, but I doubt it. My thoughts are that due to arcing etc the grease that lubed the switch mech has melted and flowed to the contacts, casuing more arcing etc etc
As far as I know grease is an insulator, not a conductor
David
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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quietguy/David wrote:
As far as I know grease is an insulator, not a conductor
========= You will discover that manufacturers and wise repair people use grease on many electrical applications.
Watch a pro work on an automobile "no start" problem and you will most likely see him remove, clean and grease every contact in the high current starting circuit. Proper operation of the circuit isdependent upon extremely low resistence and the grease is there to prevent the corrosion which will ruin that low resistence circuit.
Once again, as others have said, the optimal goal is to restore the switch to the same condition that it was in when fresh from the manufacturer, or install a replacement switch which meets that condition. The OEM switch has a particular type of grease in it. It is there for a reason. Emulate the manufacturer and do the same.
Gideon
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quietguy wrote:

especially older ones that are designed to be repaired.
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The best contact cleaners for many switches and pots contain a (non-conductive) lubricant that is left behind.... this protects the contact from rapidly oxidizing and pitting. In the old rotary TV tuners..... which contains multiple switch wiping contacts, a lubricating contact cleaner was always used for smooth, reliable, and long lasting repair. You obviously DO NOT want to use a CONDUCTIVE grease.... this would short everything out in a switch or pot. A light grease is used for smaller low current applications and a heavier grease is used for higher current applications. Silicon greases are good but also many petroleum based greases can be used. electricitym . . .
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Not all grease is created the same. You want to use only grease designed for electrical work. It's cheap and you can find it at the auto parts store.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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