Cleaning a Garden Hose

I have one of those no-kink light green garden hoses that has gotten quite gummy on the outside. It's kind of black looking, at least brown from the soil. Anyway to clean this off? I tried 409 to no avail.
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W. Watson wrote:

Try orange juice. It's a surprisingly effective degreaser.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

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Those light green flexible no-kink hoses seem to be suseptible to becoming gummy depending on the local environment.
At my parents' house those got gummy but at mine thye did not.
I cleaned them up using SoftScrub liquid cleanser with cloth rags & a fair amount of effort.
My dad switched to a farily heavy rubber hose, I kept the no-kink ones & the gummy condition never returned.
cheers Bob
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W. Watson writes:

Exuded plasticizer. Use naphtha with Scotch-Brite and paper towels. Best price on naphtha is disguised as Coleman fuel.
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I will guess it is mold . Mold grows on my plastic lawn furniture so it could grow on a wet hose. If so bleach is your only choise if it is in fact mold. Put a little bleach on a section if it changes color in a few minutes it is mold. If so use a 5 gal bucket pour in a gallon of bleach and fill with water and let the hose sit for 15 minutes. Then hose off the hose with a sharp stream of water
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m Ransley wrote:

and applied it by rubbing back and forth. After a minute the green started to appear. I'll try more tomorrow.
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He can't because the hose is in the bucket. :)
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Mr. Ransley: Have you tried this with your head?
Yes?
Well, there's her problem.
Never mind ..................
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m Ransley writes:

Mold growing on the plasticizer used to soften the PVC, not the PVC itself. Many cheap plasticizers support microbial growth. PVC does not. The plasticizers also exude to the surface, compounding the problem.
Learned this the hard way using Closet Maid vinyl-coated wire shelves on an outdoor porch. They were white when new, and then promptly turned ugly mildewed black.
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On Fri, 01 Jul 2005 02:11:30 -0500, Richard J Kinch

Coleman fuel is Naptha ? Is it pure? I am asking because I used to add a small amount of naptha to the gas in my car and it not only keeps the carburetor clean, but it also adds power, by boosting the octane. Race drivers use it, so I gave it a try. I used to get it free where I worked, because they had a half of a 55 gallon drum of it from when they replaced the rubber roof. They used it for something on the roof, I think as a cleaner before gluing the rubber, but I am not sure. All I know is that it sat around and because it's flammable or toxic or something, they could not throw it away. So my boss was glad I took some. I would add about a cup to a tank of gas, so that drum lasted a long time. The stuff sold in the hardware stores in quart cans for a paint solvent or something like that, is far too expensive. So if Coleman fuel is pure, I am going to get some of that.
And, no, it did not damage my engine. In fact I still have the engine. The the tranny died and the frame was rusting bad so I saved the engine and junked the car.
Mark
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snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

Good question. I guess the question is it pure enough and pure in the right ways for your use. Off hand I would guess it is, but I, like you would not want to bet my car's engine on a guess. I know that it was packaged and sold by Coleman because the "white gas" available at the time was not clean enough for their equipment and it would damage their lamps and stoves. But that would not mean it is free of substances that could harm your engine.

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Joseph Meehan

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Yes.
Define "pure". Naphtha itself is an indefinite product, a blend of various hydrocarbon substances, such as hexane, not just one thing. Likewise gasoline, but gasoline is even more indefinite, and contains non- hydrocarbon additives for motor fuel purposes.
Coleman fuel is pure in the sense that it is all hydrocarbon fuel.
Any notion that a bit added to your gas tank would help clean a carburetor is wishful thinking.
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W. Watson wrote:

I can't believe that so many people worry about it.
Just call me a slob. :-)
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Joseph Meehan

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I will bet it is mold-slimey, so I can see where it would be anoying to hold a moldy-slimey hose. My main use of bleach is keeping the porch, outdoor furniture and concrete clean since im in shade.
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replying to W. Watson, Prowler wrote: I had the same problem. Tried every solvent and super cleaners in my shop with no success. Then I tried Goo Gone with a 3M pad . This worked pretty well. Clean off the sticky substance with the Goo Gone/3M pad, and then wipe off with a wet towel or paper towels.
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