Clean dirty bathtub

My bathtub has a stain in it that is impossible to remove so far. Here is a picture of it: http://www.flickr.com/photos/54230006@N07/sets/72157629878927850 /.
What should I use to remove the stain? I tried bleach and it does not work. It feels rather rough and even powderly at the stained area.
Thanks
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The porcelain coating on the cast iron tub has become worn you have rust stains, bleach will not remove rust stains...
You can try a rust remover like CLR (or something stronger if CLR doesn't work) but you will have to keep cleaning those spots as the porcelain has now become porous and will continue to develop stains in those places until you have the tub refinished...
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/26/2012 7:54 PM, Evan wrote:

Doesn't look like typical rust stain....looks more like lime deposits, in which case CLR would do a good job. Odd location for deposits. We have a composite sink in bathroom and hard water; I've used toothpaste on my finger to rub out light stains.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Might be not a stain, but might be the enamel is worn through.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
What should I use to remove the stain? I tried bleach and it does not work. It feels rather rough and even powderly at the stained area.
Thanks
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think you are right. What does it take to refinish the tub? Is it a pro job?
On May 26, 5:31 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

9878927850/.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Never done one. I have totally no information.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, May 27, 2012 2:10:26 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

629878927850/.
I am directing this to Robert Macy, I have hf in 500 Ml About a pint. Its concentrate is 48%. What is the dilution used for etching tubs for paint prep.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Oct 17, 3:54 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

almost missed this posting.
BE CAREFUL. That stuff generates fumes that are corrosive.especially to mucosa tissues.
Do not know the answer.
Did you try posting to the chemistry Usenet groups?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/26/2012 8:31 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I've seen "refinishing" (painting) of a tub once, and it was CRAP. When an OP is apparently/obviously inexperienced, we should try to start simply - refinishing tubs or bombing them with inappropriate acids are not a good starting place. Close up photos and a better description would also seem to be needed...if the tub finish is gone, then the areas should be pitted and (usually) rusting.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/27/2012 4:03 PM, Norminn wrote:

I found out, sort of by accident, that drain cleaner helps clean up some of those stains. At some point though it also removed some of the finish, so not good for long term use!
I had a tub refinished professionally, when I was selling the house. It looked really good afterwards - sort of blindingly white and very smooth and well done. You do have to be more careful though in terms of what sort of cleaning solutions you can use on it afterwards.
I've seen refinishing patch kits sold on line, but I don't know what sort of results they produce. I believe the professional guys can also do patching, and would imagine they could alter the color of the finish as well to make it better match an older tub.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think there is no rust. It appears the gloss has worn away as yo said.
Can a pro refinish the worn area or do they have to do the entire tub?

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Whink, mild HF acid
WEAR GLOVES!!!! Else the tiny bit that gets under your nails you'll pay dearly for, ...after about an hour, then feel the pain for days.
You can also 'try' Dial Liquid antibacterial handsoap - the thick gold color. Put on a paper towel [the liquid onto the towel, not YOU putting on the towel] and rub into the stain area. We found that the product sometimes removes/reverts rusted tools and metal damage back to new like shine.
May be more difficult for you to get [may be available at janitorial suppliers, Unicide 256 by Brulins, Indiana. It's a quaternary compound in the form of a sanitizing liquid for use around people and pets - hospitals, veterinarian clinics, etc. The product is supposed to be cut 256:1, so that a gallon makes 256 gallons of bleach-like killing power. But my wife found that at 16 to 20:1 it 'returns' metal. Example, rusted chrome plated vacuum cleaner tube. Tube was rough and reddish powdery and came off on everything, essentially became a trash tube. Wipe with unicide solution and the rust ALL disappeared, the chrome shine came back, and all that was noticeable were tiny little pin-prick like holes over the surface [pitting], but the tube no longer turned your hands red and at a distance looked new. Example 2: finally discovered our lost pair of Krauter pliers had been left outside for one year! Rust beyond belief, would not even open/close, absolutely rigid. After soaking in solution and then rubbing surfaces to polish, regained pliers. However, as expected the pliers were permanently roughened, but at least finish was stable and after oiling, the pliers were as good as new, didn't even notice any 'play' in the box joint.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert Macy wrote:

HF? OMG! NEVER!
Even the tiniest amount of the most diluted Hydrofluoric acid is a calcium blocker and will stop your heart. The treatment for HF poisoning is hit-and-miss.
I think you meant HCl or hydrochloric acid, sometimes called Muriatic acid. Be prepared for fumes and set up some good ventilation.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Believe it or not, there is a product on the market that contains HF for use in rust removal. I can not remember the name but it is even sold in my local Ace Hardware. The first time I heard of it, I demanded the fellow who told me about it bring in the bottle because I could not believe it. Sure enough, the primary active ingredient was HF. He took it away from his mother who was about to use it on a kitchen oven. The scary thing to me about HF is that the deadly effects are not immediate when the skin is exposed to a tiny amount. The pain gets worse until it is unbearable. By that time, the HF has made it to the bone and its calcium channel blocking effects can occur shortly thereafter.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

if his tub surface feels rough,the porcelain has already lost it's gloss(been etched) and need to be refinished or replaced. If refinished,the new surface must be treated gently,NO abrasive cleaners,and use a "tub mat" made from that rubberized shelf liner(it's not antislip). if you use a regular tub mat,the anti-slip suction cups will rip up the new finish.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Read the label. HF acid.
I tried to etch glass with it, but too dilute.
Instantly removes rust stains almost anywhere. Keep it off aluminum.
Less than $3 a bottle, from memory.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert Macy wrote:

Sigh. Where's the Consumer Product Safety Commission when you need it?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Despite Evan's pronouncement that the problem has been identified and a solution determined.....
I'd like to ask a couple questions.
What is the tub material? Porcelain over cast iron porcelain over stamped steel?
Porcelain over stamped steel tubs do not behave as well as cast iron ones. Stamped steel tubs are not nearly as stiff as a cast iron tub. Stamped steel tubs are susceptible to localized deflection & thus damage to the porcelain coating.
When the tub is used & then drained, does some water remain in the areas of the stain or does the tub drain completely with not a bit of water remaining?
If small puddles of water remain in the stained areas, this situation might be one of years of evaporative deposition.
Just adjacent to the stain (like within a few inches) is the porcelain smooth, glossy & in good shape? If the adjacent areas are in good shape & the tub allows water to puddle then Norman's suggestion that lime deposits might be the problem is worth a look.
Deposits warrant the use of an acid "cleaner" like CLR.
Let us know how things turn out.
cheers Bob
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.