Circulation direction in radiator system

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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

At the risk of asking a really dumb question.....Is something akin to an automotive cooling system "stop leak" product ever put into a hydronic heating system to plug a small leak (maybe as just a stopgap "fix") without screwing up something else in the system?
I thought about that because I know its not uncommon to use an antifreeze mixture in hydronic heating systems at places like vacation homes where the temperature may deliberately or accidentally get down to freezing when the place is unoccupied.
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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I don't know if there is or not but I did think about that. Then I decided that I should just fix it properly because I don't know how long something like that would be effective. I'd end up having to fix it sometime anyway.
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No. Stuff like that can prevent valves from seating properly.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

Y'know I thought about that but then said to myself that I'd never heard of it causing problems with the valves which control the flow of water through the heater core in most cars, so maybe that "stop leak" stuff only "clogs" small holes between the fluid side and the "outside".
But, I'll take your woid for it...<G>
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
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Yeah, the "stop leak" stuff is a bunch of small particles that are supposed to clog and block any small holes to the outside world. There's no worry about blocking the thermostat because that's a *big* opening when it's open. Nor do you care about the thermostat not quite closing properly because it has a deliberate bypass passage so there's always some coolant flowing anyway.
On the other hand, solenoid valves sometimes have very small pilot valves (that switch water pressure that then opens the main valve). You wouldn't want to block that or the valve might not open. Nor would you want the main valve to leak when it's supposed to be off, since that might mean heat in a room that is already warm enough.
    Dave
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In the winter when the heat is running you "may" be able to detect a difference in temperature between the supply and return pipes at a radiator. The best way would be to visually inspect the piping and trace back to the circulator pump. BTW, there will be pressure on both lines, I'm not understanding what you are trying to do to find the leak. How will capping of a line help?
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There are no stupid questions, but there are lots of stupid answers.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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Any reason you can't just turn down the thermostates until the system goes cold (or at least cool), then turn up a thermostat so the system comes on and feel which pipe gets hotter before the other.
It's rather low tech but that's the way it's been done for generations.
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I would have done that but once I located the proper pipes to the room in question, it became obvious. Plus, the valves all have arrows on them.
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