Circular saws: Which type to buy? Worm-drive or side-winder?

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I'm soon to begin constructing a ground level (i.e. 14" above ground) cedar deck off the back of my house, and so right now I'm in the process of determining all that I will need to purchase before I begin, including a few new power tools. For example, the circular saw I have is okay for occasional use but I dread using it for a whole project, so I want to buy myself a considerably better one. Now, aside from value-per-price considerations, what should I look for in shopping for a very-good to high quality circular saw? And in particular, what should I make of "worm-drive" versus the more common, "side-winder", type saws?
A couple of acquaintances of mine praise their worm-drives as being inherently superior in every way to the ordinary (i.e. side-winder) type. But I've noticed that these worm-drive saws are comparatively heavier (which might not be ergonominally advantageous, I don't know). And the position of the handles on these saws just looks (to my minds eye, at least) to be awkward to handle and perhaps not intended for close, precision or finishing work.
Of course, since I haven't actually ever used a worm-drive saw, my untested perceptions of it don't necessarily mean a thing. Hence, I'm posting this message in the hopes someone might 'enlighten' me in this before I come to a decision what to buy. Thanks in advance...
Ken
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Makita makes a fantastic worm drive saw. The heft or feel is an important aspect of the tool to the end user. You will learn to love and respect it. Avoid any tools made in the USA. Good news is, way things are going not much is being made there due to high defect rates.
-- Troweller^nospam^@canada.com
Remove the obvious to reply. Experienced and reliable Concrete Finishing and Synthetic Stucco application in the GTA.

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message

Your not only obnoxious and an obvious troll but inaccurate as well.....While the U.S. imports more than anyone else in the world we also export more than anyone as well.....As the most productive country in the world we simply smile at our less fortunate (ride on our coattails) Northern neighbors<G>.
Saw wise I vote for my Mag Skil wormdrive...in fact I voted twice since the first was lost/stolen
Rod
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I find this hard to believe. As a Canadian living close to the border, I often prefer to shop for products of all kinds in the states, not just because there's almost always a greater selection in the stores there, but also because I can specifically find tools that state "made in the U.S.A.". Of course, this is only my bias and says nothing about the facts related to tool products. But I do know that, in broad terms, North American products in general (whether made in Canada or the U.S., doesn't matter) are made less for quality in favor of affordability; in contrast to say, European manufacturers for example, who make more expensive "high end" products, frequently of exquisite quality. But none of this means that North American made products are not good. Just that they're not usually the very best that money can buy.

No. Manufacturers all over the world are using factories in China to take advantage of the cheap labour there. And products made in China, at least to my mind, seem to have higher defect rates (although I see no reason to doubt that that will change in the future).
Ken
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Ken Moiarty wrote:

Like Festo or Fein? Remember when the Fein triangular blade detail sander was first sold in North America? It was around $600. Nice tool, serious money. Then the Japanese and American companies glommed onto the idea, put out their versions, cut the price by two-thirds and now the Fein is selling for the same price. Nice tools though.

When people bring up the quality of Chinese production, I point to the bicycle factories in Taiwan. You specify the degree of quality, you pay for it, you get it. Same most places.
As far as the choice between saws, if it's your only saw, 60-40 in favor of the sidewinder. Get a higher end DeWalt, Makita or the like.
R
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wrote

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Every time I do a job I budget 10% for tools... my little giftie for having to sweat ...so now I have maybe 4or 5 side widers 5" to 12"... an 8.5 skill worm drive, a 16" miter saw, and 3 smaller ones..and a 12" chinese sliding compound miter saw...they gatther a lot of dust but boy am I ready to saw the hell out of anything on a moments notice. I'm a hell of a driller too.. you name it and I can drill the hell out of it.
Same with torches and electrical gismo's... So now mini warehouse storages in 6k a year... brilliant hu?
Phil Scott

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Ken Moiarty wrote:

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this is Turtle.
your ideal might be good but we might try to buy the tools that Cuba , Libia, or maybe France. i sure like to help out other country that love us so much.
One point here is your telling this man to pay about 3 times what a normal saw will cost from the states and use it one time a lot and use it maybe 5 or 6 time in the next 20 years. he will never get the use out of it to try to get his money back on paying 3 times as much. Now he could put it on display in his living room and set up at nite and say, that's a very nice say and i love it to death. Worm gear saws are only for people who really use them a great bit and not a hobby wood worker. Also the worm type will wear you out just picking it up in use as being heavier in weight. I have had 4 Skill saws in my life and never wore one out yet. One went with 230 volts plugged to it and the other one went with Van run over it. the other 2 is still in my Van being used. So Skill tools are not all that bad of stuff as you speak here.
TURTLE
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Did you jump onto someone's porch and plug it in? Was that how?
--

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
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This is Turtle.
No , on top of a school where they had a Diconnect box with 230 volt 3 phase and the help hooked on to two hots with alligator clips and sawed about 1 inches. I do all the hooking up from that time on.
TURTLE
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phase and

inches. I

I did that to a vaccumn pump once. It didn't let out the magic smoke, but didn't pump too well. As soon as I realized what I had done, and that didn't take too long, I corrected the wiring. It's still running years later.
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Saws, computers, and most appliances run on smoke. When the smoke gets out they stop running.
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but
And there ain't no way to get the smoke back in...
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HeatMan wrote:

It all depends on where the smoke leaked out. Often it leaks out through a capacitor, resistor or inductor which can be replaced. Plugging it back in again refills it with smoke and it will work again as long as you really did get the leak plugged. :-)
Matt
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The biggest advantage of the worm gear drive saw is that the blade is on the opposite side of the saw. If you are right handed you can follow a line much better with a worm gear saw. They also make a "sidewinder" saw with the blade on the left side. If you are right handed get a saw with the blade on the left. If you are left handed, get a saw with the blade on the right.
--
JerryD(upstateNY)
"Ken Moiarty" < snipped-for-privacy@shaw.ca> wrote in message
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Joe wrote:

Worm drive has the definite power advantage. I have a 20 year old Milwaukee side winder. Nice saw but it will bog down on some cuts. Youll get accustom to the weight, go worm drive.
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scribbled this interesting note:

There is another advantage to the worm drive saw-at least the Skil that I prefer. The handle is more-or-less in line with the blade, meaning there is far less torque from your hand as you move the saw across the cut. With the various circular saws that are most common, (blade on the right, handle on the left, the reverse is the case if you buy the other option) your hand is attempting to force the blade in a circle to the right, or left if you got the other kind. Put the handle in just about the same plane as the blade and there is far less sideways force attempting to distort your cut.
-- John Willis (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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Skill77. (worm drive) Been in construction for 25 years. Best hand saw going. Used up my first one about 8 years ago I am now on #2. I also have a direct drive Makita I bought to cut out mitered risers on stringers. (need a left tilt saw and a right tilt saw for this type of work) The worm is superior in handling and power (gear reduction).

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i happen to like my porter-cable just fine.
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Worm drive. The mag is lighter but more expensive, probably not worth the money for a homeowner. The weight of the saw can actually be an advantage when cutting lumber. Hold the board at an angle and instead of you pushing, the saw uses gravity and just falls through the board. All you have to do is steer the thing in a straight line. I don't know about others, but I can cut much more accurately with a worm drive as opposed to a sidewinder.
Buy one, you won't regret it. Don't forget the carbide blade.
CR
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