Circular Saw - Right or Left Side Blade ?

It's time to replace my old circular saw and I see that there are saws with blades on both sides. The saws with blades on one side appear to be for framing, and the others, I guess, are for general work. The old Porter Cable I inherited has the blade on the right side, and this is what I'm used to. Thinking about typical uses, I see advantages and disadvantages for each. Can someone tell me more about the differences? BTW, I'm right handed.
- Magnusfarce
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I have never seen one with the blade on the left. That's really bizarre. What's the point????
Actually, I'd like one with a blade on BOTH sides. That way I could cut two boards at the same time <lol>
Happy Turkey Day
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On Wed, 24 Nov 2004 22:28:07 -0800, "Magnusfarce"

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What is so bizarre about being left handed? About 17% of us are and having the blade on the left is a big deal. When you get your head out of your ass you will see there are things in this world you've never seen.
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wrote:

I guess I never thought about one for left handed people. I just figured everyone used the same. I can use my right handed one in either hand, and although I use the right hand more often (being right handed), I do my fair share of left handed use in odd places and situations too, using the same saw. Of course I was in the construction biz for many years, and I tend to use a circular saw to do things that often freak out some people. For example, if I have to place a 2x4 in a crooked door frame, and the frame requires a thinner than 1.5 inch 2x4 at the top of bottom of the door, I will use the saw as a grinder to take off 1/4" of thickness, simply by holding the guard open and dragging the blade down the surface of the 2x4 to form the taper. People often ask how I manage to get the thing so precise. I tell them if you do anything half your life you just know what to do.
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One way of thinking is direct drive right blade saws are best for for righties, left blade saws for lefties. Idea is, if you hold a piece with your left hand, the larger portion of the base is contacting the wood (for righties). But then, the more robust worm drive saws preferred by framers tend to be left blade, although they are better balanced and the sole plates are different. Go figure.
<< The old Porter-Cable I inherited has the blade on the right side, and this is what I'm used to. >>
Why change a good thing? A new P-C will probably feel just right to you. HTH
Joe
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I was thinking about that. You're right about the plate being on the preferred side (on the supported or main piece of wood rather than on the scrap) when the blade is on the right, but then the blade is obscured by the saw and it's harder to see your line. I guess there's no way around that.
- Magnusfarce

righties,
hand,
left
different. Go

this
HTH
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Left sided saws cut off your nuts on kickback, rightsided cut off your foreman that wasto close PC is good, get the ' Foreman " model, or the " nut " model;
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with
used
My corded saw has the blade on the right and my battery saw has the blade on the left.
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On Wed, 24 Nov 2004 22:28:07 -0800, "Magnusfarce"

We call them male and female sawblades here. One is good for cutting tenons and the other for grooves, I forget which since they are more a hassle than they are worth.. You have to store the sawblades in separate boxes or else they tend to grab onto each other and its darn difficult to pull those sharp teeth apart. But then with a bit of luck you get a lot of little sawlets good for the Dremel saw attachment.
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It's funny, really. A right handed person should, you would think, have the blade on the left side of the tool so your eye can see the cut while holding the tool with your right hand. However, they are mostly found on the right side, so when using the saw in your right hand, you have to lean over the motor and guard to look at the cut. A few years ago I was given a DeWalt 18 volt unit with the blade on the left side. DeWalt lists this arrangement as a "feature!" It was very awkward for me (right handed) at first. I now can go back and forth between the 2 with no problems. So, using this theory, the majority of saws are designed for the 17% (left handed people). Weird!
PaPaPeng wrote:

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Magnusfarce wrote:

The benifit of having the blade on the left side is that you can SEE it when you are cutting if you are right handed. Most pro saws have the blade on the left because they use it a lot. The consumer saws are on the right because it is preceived to be "safer" for the inept homeowner to use. On the right requires you to crane your neck over to the right, looking over the saw, to see where the blade is cutting. Not the best for accurate cuts.
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On Wed, 24 Nov 2004 22:28:07 -0800, "Magnusfarce"

If the saw directs the sawdust out the side of the blade housing, using a right blade/right hand would direct it away from the user.
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