circuit breaker boxes

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Typical 100 amp panel has about 20 spaces

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On Fri, 2 Feb 2007 15:53:44 -0500, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

That's how many mine does (100A Square D Q0). I don't know about a 125A.

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Mark Lloyd
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I don't know that I've ever seen a factory built 125 amp main breaker panel. I've seen 125 amp main lug panels, and 125 amp main disconnect panels. I can't even find one googling for it

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bubblegummom wrote:

Wrong question. No one here is going to consider a 125A box when a 200A box is the standard, costs no more to install, has plenty of room for expansion, and is a negligble increase in price over a 125A.
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It's partially figured by square feet. It also matters if you have electric range, clothes dryer, AC, etc. Typically a small house with gas appliances is fine with a 100 amp service, but if you intend to expand or get major electric appliances, you may want to consider a 200 amp service. The price difference between the two is generally only a few hundred dollars. How did you make out with your open circuit problem?

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RBM wrote:

A few hundred dollars? Try $65.
Here's two kits:
The 200Amp kit is $125.00 and comes with 14 breakers. <http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId9537-296-HOMVP9&lpage=none>
Here's the corresponding 100A kit for $60.00 (with a mere 5 breakers) http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId9032-296-HOMVP5&lpage=none
Mind you, these are RETAIL prices.
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Where I live, and work,(as an electrical contractor) electrical services, regardless of their amperage, don't install themselves, and while the price of installing a service is determined not only by the equipment being installed but also by particulars of each job, in general a 200 amp overhead service costs about three hundred dollars more than a 100 amp service. We also don't have a "standard" service, most new houses do have 200 amp services installed, but the NEC requires a minimum of 100 amps, and for a very small house with gas cooking 100 amps should be more than adequate

<http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId9537-296-HOMVP9&lpage=none>
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId9032-296-HOMVP5&lpage=none
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Now add in the difference between 2/0 copper (or 4/0 aluminum) vs. #2 copper (or 1/0 aluminum) service entrance conductors. Don't forget that 200A service requires a heavier grounding conductor, too.
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

The 200A service will require larger conduit for the service drop, too. And a correspondingly larger rainhead.
Not to mention... bending 4/0 cables inside a meter base is a cast-iron bitch.
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The difference in price of all the fittings, weather heads, SE connectors, bugs,meter pans
wrote:

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For a house that small, you should be able to easily get by with 125A service, even it's total-electric with central A/C. However, 200A would be a nice feature to have when you eventually sell the house. The *labor* cost of installation should be almost exactly the same, so the cost difference should be pretty much just the difference in the cost of the panels. Add another five or ten bucks, maybe, to account for needing to use heavier service entrance conductors for the 200A service.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Depending on the state and the locality you may be required to have a larger service than the national minimum. Some of the counties I work in require a 150 ampere minimum service to detached dwellings. It is worth your time to check with the local electrical inspectors office.
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Tom Horne

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wrote:

It's figured by what you estimate the electrical demand to be, and then again by how many different circuts you want. What's the price difference, and what size wire is your service drop? The only reason I can think of to go with a smaller panel than you can is if the price difference is a deal-breaker, or if the larger size requires a new service drop and the smaller one doesn't.
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Goedjn wrote:

I'm of the "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" school. The OP might find the upgrade requires bringing everything else up to current code, which could get very expensive. A bit of conservation could pay big dividends.
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If you have electric Dryer, AND central a/c, AND an electric range, then go all the way to 200. If you have only 1 or 2 of these 3 items, then you can probably go less. But why? Just go the 200 and be done.
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Steve Barker


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then you upgrade your kitchen..... code calls for at least 2 dedicated 20 amp GFCI circuits plus one for dishwasher, one for fridge, just a kitchen can eat up 6 breakers
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wrote:

ut why?

My kitchen is using 8 spaces. Double-pole breakers for oven and cooktop (these are separate built-in units), a dedicated circuit for the dishwasher, and 3 additional circuits.
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Mark Lloyd
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Steve Barker wrote:

In other words, it's only money ...
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Well, like Doug said, it's only a few dollars difference on the equipment.
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Steve Barker


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Steve Barker wrote:

That was a very simplistic consideration of what might be involved.
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