Cinder block footer

Hi.
Had shed put in and I did not realize the slope was so large. To level, 1x8x16 cynder blocks were purchased ahead of time. I did not think the contractor would need to stack as high.
I have about 8 of these stacked for one side of the shed to keep level. (3 columns of 8 across the back of the shed).
Am I asking for trouble from a stability perspective?
Hoping to put lattice work or something to hide the gap.
Thanks. j
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I hope they are not just stacked and that they were placed on a footer?
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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Hi.
Just the ground. Will I look to see a sinking shed?
THis is supposedly the standard method they use. I was just surprised by the height.
I might be hosed.
j

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According to residential building code (in NC), for a one-story structure up to 100 square feet, the pier can be 8x16 inches, height not to exceed 10x the least dimension, on a footing of 1'4" x 2', and 8" thick, with the bottom of those 8 inches being 12 inches below grade. That's for soil that can bear 2000 pounds per square foot (so take a look at other well-built structures or decks in your neighborhood or call the local inspector to ask about average soil in your area). Piers must bear on the center 1/3 of footings, and girders shall bear on center 1/3 of piers. As built, your piers will fail (because the bottom block will slide, not because the column is too weak). I am not an engineer, so don't take this as absolute fact, ... this is my (probably accurate) reading of the code.
Want to ask me anything else? I'm practicing to read the book for an exam! -B

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Hi. Apparently they have built these 'sheds' up to 36 inches off the ground at one end. There might be different codes for sheds. I did get a permit from the county, but I did not need to pay for the permit.
There is no inspection of footers, etc. If you build a deck for your house, then there is an inspection and you must have footers.
Based on "Storage Buildings, INC", they have used this cement block technique for years. If the building is put up plum the gravity does the rest. What about blowing away? Well, they use wood and it is heavy. If a wind can take it, it would have taken it anyway.
In hind sight, I would have liked real footers, but don't have them now. There is gurarantee of 5 years and if it does settle in strange way, they will fix.
Does the code book you have mention anything about buildings used, but not for living?
THanks.
Also, the builder made the point about old structures from the 1800s which used the technique.
Jim

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From what you describe, I think the greatest danger might be in the shed shifting laterally toward the downside of the hill and the cinderblock piers tipping over and causing the entire structure to collapse down the hill. I can almost picture that, if you gave the shed a little push toward the downside of the hill, you could cause the piers to tip over and the shed to completely collapse. If that's the case, then water runoff and/or ground shifts from freezing/thawing could do the same thing.

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Yes, that is what I was thinking, but because of the force of gravity and the weight of the shed, the theory is this can't happen. The force vector required to make this happen is large.
I did push on it and can't really budge it.
Hoping for the best.
Thanks.
Jim

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