china-plate(clock): how to attach picture-hanging wire to it?


We've got this "china-plate kitchen-clock" to hang on the wall.
It came with one wee attachment-point and wee wire-loop, darn near impossible to get to go over a picture-hook on the wall.
What I want to do is to treat it as a picture-hanging job, ie with *two* attachment-points, several inches apart, to which I can attach a picture-hanging wire, making an upside-down V, and hang *that* over the wall-hook.
(That way it'll be easy to hang, and also easy to get the noon-position vertically over the six-position.)
QUESTION: how to attach the picture-hanging wire to the (back side of) the plate?
Glue?: What *kind* of glue?
Drilling two holes? Nah -- "boss" wouldn't allow me to do that!
Some kind of ready-made plate-hanging hardware?
(Might not be able to do that either, if visible -- deemed "ugly", "ruins the look", etc.)
Ideas?
Thanks!
David
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I've done a very similar job with generous globs of a slow-cure two-part epoxy. Just check the directions to ensure the specific epoxy you use is compatible with the materials you're attempting to glue.
If possible, try and scratch the glaze a little at the points you apply the glue to get the best adhesion you can. I used a minature and very hard file but a glass or tile cutter will probably work just as well.
In my case the glue globs have about the diameter of a dime.
It's held about 10 years and counting...
Having said all that, a mechanical fastening would be preferable if you can find a way... I couldn't either!
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I would probably use a plate hanger. If you look carefully, you can find some where the hooks that hold the plate are very unobtrusive. This is one of those times when shopping carefully (don't buy the first one you see in the dime store) and spending a little more (like three bucks as opposed to ninety-nine cents) will be worth it. Antique shops are often a good source for the better quality ones.
Jo Ann
David Combs wrote:

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