chimney problems

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Don, if you follow the thread, I never suggested throwing expensive fixes at minor problems. I suggested that he get a chimney inspector over to do an inspection on a 50 year old chimney, with unkown history, that is showing signs of problems. A chimney inspection isn't expensive. Sure, it could very well just be leaking flashing. Or it could be that and/or a deteriorated chimney, which he'll never know without having it inspected. Based on what might be found, I then gave some alternatives, as did Hallerb.
So don't go making assumptions about my background and experience and I won't make any about your experience or qualifications. I'd like to see one reference from any credible source that says having an inspection done on a 50 year old chimney with totally unknown history that is showing signs of problems is a bad idea. What exactly is wrong with that? Quite the contrary, you'll find that the available info would encourage having an inspection done. I already provided a link that shows alleged expert Moe is clueless about chimneys when he claimed I was wrong and steel chimney liners are never used in HVAC applications. So, maybe I know a bit more than you think.
If I bought this house 2 years ago I would have an inspection done without any signs of problems because I believe in knowing what I have and fixing things before they become major problems, especially where safety is a factor. Suppose the 50 year old chimney has a nest or debris blocking most of the opening? You'd prefer not to know?
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On 3 Mar 2007 05:19:39 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I have followed the thread. Let's agree that the problem is moisture (proven by the tell tale signs of brownish staining ) Let's also agree that the problem is between the ceiling and the roof, as moisture is subject to gravity.
As I don't know where this house is exactly, I'm not familiar with purchasing practices. Where I am, it is common to have a building inspected before purchase. The chimney should have been inspected at that time. I doubt it was inspected as the original poster said he went on the roof to discover silicone.....which would have been in the building inspection synopsis.
With the make-shift patch of silicone on the roof, I'm 99% sure that is the source of the problem. In fact, I have a hard time picturing a leaking chimney spouting out heated air into the attic; meeting the cold air and becoming frost, only to be reheated by the leaking chimney to turn into moisture and flow down the outside of the chimney through the insulation, and getting at the plaster.
I suspect that this problem started in the summer when it was raining and has finally worked it's way to the plaster. Now a chimney inspection would reveal this and for everyone's peace of mind I'll agree.........but installing a new furnace and the such is just plain nuts.

How exactly is a nest or chimney blockage going to cause moisture??

I already know ;)
Don
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Anyone who has dealt with any problems of this type, knows that to make the above statement of being 99% certain of the cause of a chimney water problem that you haven't even seen is foolish.
In fact, I have a hard time picturing a

Please stop trying to make it look like I said to install a new furnace because of water showing up on the wall by his chimney, because it's untrue. One more time:
I suggested he get his 50 year old chimney inspected. It seems you think it should have been done when he purchased the house 2 years ago and also that it's unlikely that it was done at that time. So, what's your problem with having it inspected now?
And again, if you read what I posted, I only brought up the possibility of considering a new high efficiency direct vent furnace as an alternative if it's determined the chimney has serious problems that require costly repairs. What's your problem with that?
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On 3 Mar 2007 10:37:07 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I'm 99% sure you have your head up your ass.

I'm 99% sure you also have no reading comprehension as I agreed with a chimney inspection above.

I'm 99% sure that you're going to have the last word here as I'm done. Hopefully the original got some info out of this prolonged thread.
Oh, yea.........how does chimney blockage cause moisture again??
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Comments inserted, for the guy that can't figure out how to take the HTML off.
Just because you believe in putting in a new high efficiency furnace, because there is a roof leak, doesn't mean everyone lacks as much common sense as you lack.
And speaking about conditions of homes, I will post some interior and exterior shots of my home, if you're willing to do the same. Let's go mouth.

You're pointing out something entirely irrelevant. You really don't have any knowledge on maitaining a home, the more you open your mouth, the more you show it.
You don't fix a roof leak, by putting in a high efficiency furnace! LOL...geesh dude, you're dense.
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Interesting you should say that. I've been assistant on a lot of chimney liner pulls. We used flexible metal liner. Dropped a wire from the roof, and pulled it through.
--

Christopher A. Young
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Had the chimney pro out for a look.
The chimney is too large diameter for the furnace. This causes condensation about halfway up the chimney, which is leaking out into the plaster work. Chimney guy's solution was to place a liner inside the chimney, and as predicted, this runs about $1K.
He did mention the option of replacing the furnace with a direct vent furnace, but it is a new furnace ('03/04) and a relatively effecient one, so I can't see replacing the furnace.
Line the chimney it is, then.
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Good for you! Thanks for the update. All to often we don't hear how things turn out.
And how sweet it is!
Heh Don, remember this gem:
"With the make-shift patch of silicone on the roof, I'm 99% sure that is the source of the problem. " Doh!
Or how about that genius Moe, who said I was an idiot for suggesting in my first post that you get an inspection and that condensation in an oversize chimney might be the problem. Moe then ridiculed me for suggesting a steel chimney liner might be used on a furnace for exactly this problem? LOL
And of course, by doing the right thing and getting it inspected, you've saved the chimney from failing do to the acidic flue gases condensing and destroying it over time.
That;s my last word on this thread. I'm off to go snowboarding for a few days. By all!!
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On Mar 3, 5:43�pm, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Hey it all worked out, and if it was a elderly furnace you may have decided to replace it.
I give OPTIONS, its up to the poster to decide what to do!
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and please let us know if the liner stops the leak.

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