Child door locks for entry door

Hello, I am trying to come up with some ideas for a lock for my entry door to prevent my children from opening it. It currently has a single cylinder deadbolt, but my 2yo already has figured out how to unlock it. He is pretty good about not doing it but I am worried that he might respond to the doorbell and make it to the door before we do. I considered converting it to a double cylinder, but I am a bit concerned about putting a double cylinder on an egress, though I believe it is allowed in Austin,TX. The other thought is to have a 2nd interior only deadbolt installed higher up on the door. The last is the little chains and clasps, but I would prefer if the door will not open at all. I've looked for everything I can think of, and have yielded nothing so far. What does everyone else use?
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add a door alarm, a noisy door is open annuciator, with a silence button up high the kid ant reach, often its part of whole house security systems....
a good friend used a high up hook and eye.......
kids can be very challenging......... childproof everything
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Yeah, I have one as part of the whole house alarm. But I really want to _prevent_ the door from being opened. The alarm prevents people going out w/o notice, but I really don't want him opening the door for strangers and so on.
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On Sun, 29 Jun 2008 05:36:39 -0700, crust wrote:

I've seen tamper proof outdoor spigots that require a wrench type removable handle to turn on/off. Too bad there isn't some like this for door locks. A handle with a hex wrench that fits into a socket in the door and that can be removed when necessary.
What about a security latch similar to what many hotel rooms have on entry doors? The door could be opened slightly, but at least your kid could not escape.
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This would be the fastest, quickest, cheapest, easiest: http://hardware.hardwarestore.com/73-444-door-guards/standard-brass-privacy-flip-lock-656532.aspx
but any of these will work well: http://hardware.hardwarestore.com/73-444-door-guards.aspx
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On Sun, 29 Jun 2008 05:36:39 -0700, crust wrote:

I think what you are looking for is to prevent the child from unlocking the door, not opening the door. Since your concerned about security, unlocking the door is bad enough. Otherwise I would suggest one of those latches that go on the top of the door that prevents it from opening.
Best bet is to take this opportunity to teach the child. My son has Down Syndrome so I ended up putting a key lock on the inside. Its in violation of local codes, but I have other priorities than that. If there is a fire we have 6 first floor windows we can easily climb out of. Lots of my interior doors have keylocks as well if there is any danger in that room. Of course this makes the room more interesting. I keep the keys on top of the door ledges. Now he figured out how to work a key lock because I leave the key in my bedroom too often. Then he figured out to bang into the door to get the key to drop. You can't stay in front of the forever. Just hope that maturity comes with intelligence.
A door chain too high for him might be good. The top of the door metal flap thingy might actually be good. If he realizes that unlocking the door wont open it he may stop unlocking it.
I also have the door alarm. at this point though I put the knob back on the door and a teaching him since he is able to get it now. Doesent have it yet, but it wont be long.
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I used to buy locks like this for pool gates. They can be had at lock shops and are called "institutional" locks. Yes, they need special attention, and yes, they are a pain, but yes, they do prevent someone from going outside that doesn't belong there.
Steve
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crust wrote:

stay. We have a lock in the doorknob and a second lock higher up. The upper lock was keyed to open with the same key as the other lock, but requires a key inside and out. We live on the water and didn't want the little ones waking before us and going out alone. As it was, the two year old got away and we found him leaning over the seawall looking at critters :o) The boys were 2 and 3 at the time, stayed for 5 weeks. Part of the entertainment was taking them to swim lessons - very beneficial.
I don't know how this rates on safety measures - a key can be kept nearby and out of reach of the toddler. Don't leave jewelry or lipstick where he can get to it :o:)
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crust wrote:

Add a deadbolt or surface-mount bolt high enough kid can't reach it would seem pretty sure-fire...
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