Chest freezer in garage or basement?

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On Thursday, February 27, 2014 3:16:12 PM UTC-8, DerbyDad03 wrote:



I have a 10 or more year old freezer - it has a power out alarm. I would assume all new freezers have one.
As for cold temps hampering the operation. Being a skeptic I would really like dto see the reasoning behind that. Mine sits on an unheated, enclosed porch in a climate that commonly sees temps below zero in winter - no trouble at all with the freezer.
Harry K Harry K
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On Thu, 27 Feb 2014 23:16:12 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

I have a detached garage and I don't keep the car in it. Yes, I could easily go a couple of weeks in the winter. I do have the snow blower in their so this winter it was visited often.
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On 2/27/2014 3:31 PM, TimR wrote:

> nobody checks it for a couple of weeks like happened to my neighbor,

>you put it. In this case one breaker tripped, and the garage lost > power but the rest of the house did not.

Ours, and I think most, have a loud buzzer that goes off if the temperature goes over a certain point. I need to check and see if that is battery powered or powered from the AC. If powered from the AC it obviously would not do a lot of good.
Don
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I wonder if they sell any mechanical memory devices. Like the turkey pop ups. You can buy cheap battery operated temperature monitors. You could just monitor maximum temp, but an alarm device might cost more.
Greg
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Chests are more efficient than uprights. When you open the lid the cold stays inside. When you open an upright a lot of cold air falls out.
I don't know the numbers, maybe they're insignificant, maybe not. I guess it would depend on how often and for how long the upright was opened.
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I agree with the advice to contact the manufacturer and find out what temperature range they specify for the freezer. While colder temperatures will increase the efficiency of the condenser in getting rid of the heat removed from the food, the oil in the compressor is going to get more viscous with colder temperatures and may not lubricate the moving parts in the compressor sufficiently.
Chest freezers are inherently more efficient than upright freezers because cold air is denser than warm air. So, when you open a chest freezer, the cold air remains inside as Derby Dad says.
Never ever never buy a used chest freezer if it's been turned off. That's because chest freezers are built differently than refrigerators. In a chest type freezer the evaporator coils line the inside of the freezer side walls and the condenser coils line the outsides of the freezer side walls. That's why the walls of a chest freezer will feel warm, just like the condenser coils on the back of a fridge when it's running. Because chest freezers don't have a automatic defrost like fridges, over the course of several years, frost will accumulate on the evaporator coils of the freezer. This space is sealed off and so you don't get the kind of frost accumulation that you get on a manual defrost fridge, but it will accumulate with time.
The problem is is that space is sealed off. So, if you turn off or unplug the freezer, that frost melts and forms a puddle at the bottom of the freezer. That water won't do any harm at all to the aluminum evaporator coils on the inside of the freezer walls, but in time it will cause corrosion of the STEEL condensor coils on the outside of the freezer walls. That corrosion will make the steel rough, and that results in what engineers call "stress raisers". If you have a notch in a steel tube, and you continuously pressurize and depressurize that tube, a crack will propogate from that notch because the stress on the steel is highest at the notch because the wall thickness of the tubing is smallest at the notch.
So, if you plan to sell an old freezer, put your ad in the paper, but leave the freezer plugged in and running until it's sold. Otherwise, knowledgable buyers won't want to buy it for fear it's not going to last long.
--
nestork

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And if it was on defrost.
How full the unit is might be more concern. Air has little mass.
Greg
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Hi, I understand upright uses little more power than chest type but wife hated chest freezer we had first, bending down and digging out stuff she needed. After we bought upright we use it more. She is happy.
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My thoughts, and many others, self defrosting units will cause freezer burn more than manual defrost. Temperature fluctuations help cause freezer burn. I don't have any full size units right now. I've data logged typical upper freezer refrigerators. During defrost air temperature can go well into the 20s. If it's opened during that period, even worse. I was just reading searches, because I never really worried about it much.
I bought my parents a large sears chest, around 1970. It sat in the garage for 35 years, always running. I ended up giving it away still working. It got close to 32 degrees at times in the garage. It was not used that well, mostly empty. Great for large items, and making ice bricks.
I found a problem recently. A self defrosting unit, against a cold wall will condense water vapor, causing mold.
Greg
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There is signifacant heat given offby a freezer. If you have it in the garage,you wont benefit from it.
So garage best in Summer, (but adds to AC load) Basement best inWinter.
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On 2/28/2014 6:48 AM, harryagain wrote:

Our garage is attached and not heated or cooled. Gets pretty hot in summer, and that was my main concern. We can keep the door open during hottest part of the day, but I hoped someone had real data. Our basement gets TOO cool in summer with AC running, just from the heat loss from ducts....not finished and no vents in basement. Could correct it if hubby goes for it.
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