Cheap-n-dirty shelving for concrete wall?

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Have need for shelves to hang on tilt-up concrete (not block) wall. Must be sturdy, but don't want supports at the corners. I'm thinking about some kind of triangular bracket anchored either from above (which holds a plank inside the bottom of the triangle) or from the back side (for which a plank would sit on the top of the inverted triangle):
|\\ | \\ | \\ | \\ ======------- or ======------- | / | / | / |/
(key: = is the plank)
Haven't been able to locate such locally (want to do this over the weekend upcoming).
Basically I want no forward supports, just wall attachments with some kind of diagonals.
Other ideas?
Thanks,
--
John English


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vertical tracks with hanger brackets
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If you mean those 3/4-inch wide slotted tracks with 1/8-inch thick brackets, IME, they're OK for books and brick-a-brack, but insufficient strength (I've bent the "arms" and broken a few tabs in my time) for "industrial" use.
Thanks,
--
John English


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Get the Industrial Strength double wide tracks and brackets. They carry a large load.

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Not to mention, they are adjustable and not an eye-sore like wood brackets would be.
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Thus spake Al Schmidt:

You mean these?
<http://shelving.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code 014651& Category_Code=EL-SH&Store_Code=SHELV01>
<http://shelving.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code 001019& Category_Code=EL-SH&Store_Code=SHELV01>
--
John English


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I got a fatal error on both your links.

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Thus spake Glenn:

Try: <http://shelving.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code 001019& Category_Code=EL-SH&Store_Code=SHELV01>
<http://shelving.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code 014651& Category_Code=EL-SH&Store_Code=SHELV01>
--
John English


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<snip />
No, no, no

The second diagram supports loads reliably when properly braced. It is reasonable these days to consider an adhesive that could glue the bracing to the wall but without bolting metal bracing to the concrete wall the load bearing capability of the shelf would not be very reliable unless the vertical members of each brace extend to the concrete floor.
This could easily be built by using 2x4 for the bracing. Glue the vertical members to the concrete wall using the proper adhesive made for such tasks and extend the vertical member of the braces to rest on the concrete floor. A 3/4" x 12-15" plywood shelf with bracing every 36" should suffice and could easily carry loads up to 100 lbs. without worry. I don't use or recommend particle board in a garage. It warps too easily and does not carry loads well unless the bracing is reduced to every 18-24" for any meaningful loads. I wouldn't pull my bracing in any more than 12" from either end of a shelf and still, for the most secure installation a bolt or two through each vertical brace into the concrete wall is the best solution.
--
<%= Clinton Gallagher
NET csgallagher AT metromilwaukee.com
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Thus spake clintonG:

The *kind* of bracing is the point of my question and post. What supports the shelf, in your design?
Would like to avoid an all-2x4 lumber triangle every 36 inches -- I plan to span almost 20 feet of wall with these shelves, with possibly as many as 3 or 4 shelves above the work surface. (The work surface itself is a self-supporting "box" design.)
Bolting 2x4 to the wall is no problem. I'm just trying to avoid the use of vertical "post" supports into the work area.
Thanks,
--
John English


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wrote:

I built a bunch of wall brackets out of 1x3s and 1x2s, like this: www.goedjn.com/sketch/bracket.gif
Which are adequate to hold up a good armload of 2x4s, if placed every 4'. Mine are screwed into the wall with 3.5" deck screws.
they need one screw through the tenon where the horizontal pegs to the vertical, to keep it from withdrawing, but everything else is in compression when it's loaded. Note that the tennons on the angle peice need to be at 45 degrees, or you can't assemble all three parts at once.
In my setup, the triangular open area is used to to store pipe and dowel.
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<...snipped...>

An idea used for lumber racks may be applicable to your needs: In the 2X4 supports secured to the wall, drill* 13/16" holes at desired shelf height. Insert appropriate lengtsh of 1/2" iron pipe and rest the shelves on top of them. The holes can be angled slightly to have the shelves slant downwards towards the wall if desired.
*Check the size before drilling, I believe 13/16' gives a snug fit for 1/2" iron pipe but my memory is not what it used to be. If you want, you can use 3/4" pipe for more strength, that would probably require a hole in the 1 1/8" range or thereabouts.
--
When the game is over, the pawn and the king are returned to the same box.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf.lonestar.org
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I think I've hit on an idea...
Ideally, I'm looking for a sheet metal triangle (not 3 sheet metal sides, but a 3-sided piece of sheet steel) with a flange on each of the 2 mounting sides (vertical and horizontal) for attaching to wood upright and shelving with screws. Heavy metal, not tin.
But my eyes are getting weak from the web sites I've searched for such a thing. Anyone seen such?
Thanks,
--
John English


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Thus spake John E.:

On second read, that doesn't look clear.
I mean a stamped steel triangle with flanges and screw holes on 2 edges for attaching to upright and to the shelf.
Hope that's clearer...
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John English


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go to www.mcmaster.com search wall mount shelving. I tried to post the link & it wouldn't work. for about 7 bucks a piece you can buy brackets with a 1060 lb capacity

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catalog page 1559 12" heavy duty steel, part number 1752A73

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John E. wrote:

What are you going to put on the shelves and how deep are they to be?
One rather easy way to support things in concrete or block walls is to drill holes in the concrete and mortar in appropriately long pieces of 1/2 or 3/4" galvanized pipe. Two pieces of 3/4" pipe about 16-18" long will easily support a full 50 gallon water heater...500# plus or minus. In your case, an occasional pipe clamp would secure shelf to pipe.
--

dadiOH
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wrote:

Yes. Home depot sells them as speed squares.
I'd be a bit surprised if you really need as heavy a shelf bracket as you seem to think you do. And if you DO need it, I'd be a bit concerned out the ability of the wall behind it to support it cantilevered out like that. How about some numbers?
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Thus spake Goedjn:

Yeah, that's what it reminds me of...

Maybe max 50 lbs per linear 3' of shelf. Probably won't reach that max.
One 8" shelf, one 12", one maybe 14" or so, one above the other. Drill and anchor into concrete wall a 2x4 or 2x6.
One vertical 2x and a "speed square bracket every 3'.
Just first rough plan off the top of the head.
--
John English


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wrote:

Regular old stamped sheetmetal shelf brackets out of the bin at a hardware store ought to be good for around 100 pounds each.
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