Cheap carpeting? Not my fault?

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notbob wrote:

Hello~~~~ Take it easy. How is your BP? We have a dog and very aging cat in the house. Steam cleaner is alays on standy-by. Part of daily life.
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Howdy....
Under control.

dog, here

Likewise. I DID buy the Hoover.

So is a point. Do you have one?
nb
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Definition of objectivism:
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notbob;2917452 Wrote: > On 2012-08-25, geo pearl snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:[color=blue][i] I > can purchase a $200 Hoover carpet cleaning > machine good enough to remove bloody dog stool stains.
People thinking of buying one of those mini-shampoo'ers should consider buying a small wet/dry "Shop-Vac" style vaccuum cleaner instead. That's because:
a) the carpet cleaning chemicals that the manufacturer recommends be used in it's mini-shampoo'er is a general purpose detergent like Mr. Clean or Fantastik, it just costs more. I've been cleaning carpets in my own building for near about 20 years now, and I find that Mr. Clean works as well as any of the carpet soaps that professionals in my area use, and I've used most of them at one time or another.
b) anyone can buy the stain removers that professional carpet cleaning contractors use at many of the places listed under "Janitorial Equipment & Supplies in your yellow pages phone directory, and those are meant for specific types of stains, like coffee, ink, vomit, blood, etc. and will invariably work better than a general purpose detergent will.
c) to remove stains from carpets, you need to put the correct kind of stain remover on the affected area, agitate to mix the stain remover into the stained area of the carpet, and then suck the soiled stain remover out of the carpet. You can pull the soiled stain remover out of the carpet more effectively with a wet/dry vaccuum cleaner than you can with a mini-carpet shampoo-er. That's because wet/dry vaccuum cleaners and rental carpet shampoo'ers will typically have a TWO stage vaccuum motor, whereas vaccuum cleaners and mini-shampoo'ers will typically only have a single stage vaccuum motor. (And, my carpet shampoo'er has two three stage vaccuum motors piped in parallel.)
So, by buying a $60 wet/dry vaccuum cleaner from Sears or Home Depot, a $1 spray bottle at the Dollarama, and getting to know the nice man at your local janitorial supply store, you can do as good or better a job removing stains from a carpet than you can with a $300 mini-shampoo'er.
You can't clean a whole carpet that way, but you can certainly remove stains.
PS: Don't let anyone tell you that a carpet shampoo'er gets a carpet cleaner than a vaccuum cleaner. They are two tools meant for different uses. Vaccuum cleaners are best at removing solid dirt from a carpet, like sand, spilled powders and the like. Carpet shampooers are best at removing wet and dried liquids from carpets. You should always vaccuum your carpet before shampoo'ing it. That's because as soon as you get the carpet wet, the surface tension of water will hold all the solid dirt in the carpet pile so that it's much harder to remove. Next time you're at the beach, try cleaning sand off wet feet and dry feet and see which one is easier. You get the best results by using the vaccuum cleaner to remove solid soils first, and then using the shampoo'er to remove wet or dried up liquids.
--
nestork


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So when I'm all dusty from working in the yard or doing some woodwork, I should vacuum myself off before taking a shower? ;-)
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YES
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