Charge for tree removal offset by value of wood ?

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Hello, at my new house I have a fairly large oak tree about 8 feet from the house. The trunk is about 16" in diameter, the tree is like 40' tall. This is a dumb place to have a tree, a lightning strike would be a problem and the roots could mess up my slab.
Since there's plenty of other trees farther out in the yard I am thinking about removing this one. Would a tree removal service offset the cost of the job by the value of the wood, assuming I let them keep the wood ? I don't need the wood, certainly not the boxcar load this tree represents.
Thank you.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

In a word: No. The value of the timber in a small tree like that comes nowhere near the price they will quote for removal. Then the market for a residential tree is generally zip due to probably metal inclusion. It is going to be in the several hundred dollar range and if climbing is required it will really be high.
I had a fir in much the same situation. I tried to deal with them to just fall the tree and take the wood for firewood. I would do the clean up. They only knocked off around $100 on a $500 quote (guestimated prices now, it was years ago). I finally fell it myself.
Harry K
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I got someone to do this for me, however it was a black walnut which is quite valuable. Someone here at work was able to finagle the same deal with an oak, though. Put an ad on the free stuff section of your local craigslist (offer free lumber with the stipulation that the tree must be taken down) and see what happens. Just be sure you check out who's coming to do it, i.e. make sure they're experienced, insured, etc. (Oh, and just ignore the e-mails from sniveling flower children condemning you for wanting to chop down a tree on your own property.)
Good luck, Nate

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Yeah. The OP better not live in Santa Barbara county. Chop down an oak tree here and it's a capital offense. They also come after your first-born child, your dog and sometimes even your neighbors.
No kidding. We have an actual "Oak Removal Ordinance." For every live oak you remove, you have to replant 10.
-Frank
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Lightning strike on your property is going to be a problem anyway. Even if it does not hit your house. If the tree is 16 inches in diameter and 40 feet tall is has already attacked the slab IF it has done so.
If the tree is healthily I would leave it alone and thank the person that planted it.
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On 21 Apr 2005 05:24:49 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Just put a sign in your yard and someone will remove it for the wood.
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Thank you all !
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Tree trimmers/removers aren't in the lumber business. It is highly likely you would find one interested in doing what you want.
Now, if you have a place to burn it, you can probably finagle the price as they won't have to haul it and pay to dump.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Typically not, in my experience. But you could call and ask.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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using the tree as lumber is not likely, because trees from other than natural settings are assumed to have hardware buried in the wood, thus endangering a sawmill. bill

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Probably not. You could almost certainly find a woodworker who'd be willing to do it, though. If you're not willing to let a talented amature do it, you MIGHT be able to find someone who's willing to pay the tree company to take the thing down in return for the wood. This is, of course, more likely if the tree is unusually cool for some reason. If it's infested with carpenter ants and about to come down by itself, you're SOL.
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Goedjn wrote:

twisting.
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Roger,
It will be extremely difficult to work out the deal that you want. The average tree removal company in your area does not have crews trained in harvesting lumber. They are trained to get trees down in residential areas quickly and safely. Commercial loggers, on the other hand, can "drop" a 40' tree with one cut in a forest - often with a piece of equipment which grips the tree, cuts it at the base, delimbs it and loads it on a truck.
Commercial lumber companies have no interest in trees on your property. Imagine the cost of repairing a 8' or 16' veneer blade which gets destroyed by a hidden nail. When the tree was 20' tall, did the previous owner correctly remove ALL branches up to 8' high and when the tree was about 30' tall did he remove all branches up to 16' high? This is very important for producing knot-free veneers and lumber.
An individual may be interested in harvesting the lumber from your tree, but he is not going to drop the tree as safely as somebody who is just motivated to remove the tree. He may have little knowledge of bringing down a tree near a house and he will want to bring the tree down in as many huge pieces as possible. Who pays when he drops a large limb through your roof?
My advice? Pay to have the tree brought down professionally, have the wood cut up into appropriate fireplace sizes and line up a buyer for the firewood. Most tree companies would charge you extra to haul off that valuable wood, so you will save the cost of wood removal and you will also get a few dollars from the sale of the firewood. But it will still be an expensive.
Good luck, Gideon
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in message
Hello, at my new house I have a fairly large oak tree about 8 feet from the house. The trunk is about 16" in diameter, the tree is like 40' tall. This is a dumb place to have a tree, a lightning strike would be a problem and the roots could mess up my slab.
Since there's plenty of other trees farther out in the yard I am thinking about removing this one. Would a tree removal service offset the cost of the job by the value of the wood, assuming I let them keep the wood ? I don't need the wood, certainly not the boxcar load this tree represents.
Thank you.
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my experiences have taught me that Mexicans can remove the tree cheaper. :o)
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wrote:

Yes, they may. But 8' from the house, I'd want someone that is experienced and insured.
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I recall that a typical shade tree is equal to about 12,000 Btu air conditioner.
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Probably not.
If they will stack it, you can sell it yourself. But, people who would buy it like it split. If it is not split, it won't sell for as much, as the buyer has to spend time and money splitting it.
You might come out money ahead, but not a lot, IMHO. Still a few cords of oak is worth some $$$ depending on the area. Where I used to live, it was about $130 a cord, and that was 15 years ago.
Steve
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dadiOH wrote:

....highly UNlikely...
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We don't have a great need for firewood in Florida, and many of the tree trimmers here (including the electric companies) bring a chipper to the job and chip everything up. When that happens somewhere near me, I get them to dump the chips on my lot, and it keeps me in mulch. The neighbor three doors down just had two big oaks removed. The chips were left at my place and (a) I'll have enough mulch for my garden beds for the next year, (b) the arborist doesn't have to pay the county to dump the debris, and (c) none of this desirable material goes into the landfill -- a win-win-win situation. Regards --

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On 21 Apr 2005 05:24:49 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Why not get yourself a chainsaw for $500 and cut the tree down yourself? Thats what I did this spring when a thunder storm dropped one of my trees on a neighbors fence and I had to cut two other dead ones. Don't be intimidated by the size of the tree and it's proximity to the house. Get a ladder and tie a rope high in the tree and have someone hold the rope while you cut the tree. My wife was amazed watching me drop those trees away from our house.
There's an informative web site sponsored by the OSHA division of the United States government which shows you how to safely "notch and fell a tree".
Before attempting the removal of the trees in my yard, I have probably cut down 50 or more trees in forest areas for fire wood in years past. I do have some experience felling trees so my confidence level was pretty high before I attempted the job. Come to think of it, I have been injured several times cutting trees over the years, once pulled the chainsaw into my kneecap while cutting a stump and another time stretched or snapped something in my knee trying to hold back a four ton tree with my rope. I guess most people would say I am an experienced amateur tree cutter. It can be very dangerous work if you don't understand the dynamics of cutting trees. I usually have to get my education the hard way!
Regards, Bill
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