Changing *all* the pool water without lowering the water level

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wrote

I wish I could dive again, but I wouldn't risk it. I had dreams as a kid that I was in water, and went under, and I could breathe. The first time I went down in SCUBA, it was just like the dream. Lots of fun, lots of adventure, lots of danger in my 12 years of diving. Memories to last a lifetime. Couldn't estimate how much bottom time I have or hours in a chamber. And now the equipment is light years ahead of what it was in the 70s. Have fun in the Red Sea. One of the seven people in our commercial diving class was from Israel, and told tales of diving the Red Sea, sharks, and such. Be careful and don't push your NO D dive limits. We would repet out of N, O, and Z groups. Ah, to be young and stupid again ...........
Steve
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SteveB wrote:

Can't even do easy shallow tropical stuff? I got a lot of nice pics on a simple 20' shore dive on Cozumel. Had a blast on a cenote dive that maxed out at only about 30'.

Don't think I'll be doing any serious commercial diving, I'm too old for that I think. Should be fun playing around welding in a tank though.

I'll be using nitrox, and my computer will handle deco if needed :)
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I could probably do some surface snorkeling. Maybe some less than 33' diving if I took it easy. Most stuff is within that range from the surface, and after that, it diminishes quickly, both on light and wildlife.

The commercial playing around is a hoot. Ernie's classes sound fun. But then when you take it to the other extreme, and do it 24/7 in cold water, bad sea conditions, poor visibility, and just plain bone tired, the old gal loses some luster. Like those crab fishermen, I've done 24 hours more than I could count.
Steve
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SteveB wrote:

Yep, a whole lot of fun tropical destinations with interesting stuff to see in that range.

Unfortunately his classes are rather far away for me. The CDE thing in Houston is within reach though. Who knows, if I enjoy that, perhaps a vacation up in Ernie's direction would be in order.

Yep. Just 'cause I got the dry suit cert doesn't mean I want to spend much time in cold water. Kind of the same with working in a commercial kitchen, I had a blast doing that one day, but I don't think I'd enjoy it much after a week or so.
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I graduated from Ocean Corporation in Nov. 1974. It was up on Richmond in Montrose. Now, IIRC, it is near 59 and 610 Loop. I believe I saw their tank one time driving 610. I think it's the same outfit, just a few owners later.
Steve
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there is a very good reason you were getting blank stares. it sounds ridicules. just check the chemicals and only change out as much water as needed.
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I'm not a pool professional; however, this all seems to be overkill. The main purpose of this process seems to be to introduce new water, so why not simply allow the water to drain while running "fresh" water into it. While this would not ensure that only the "old" water is lost , the percentage of "new" water should necessarily increase over time--by the time you've run the equivalent of enough water to fill the pool, I would think the ration of new/old would be pretty favorable. I would guess that if you drain from the bottom and introduce more water from close to the surface, minimizing water movement as much as possible, the vast majority removed, at least initially, would be the water previously in the pool. If you could verify that the critical level the water could drop was actually more than 1 foot, you could drain to that point before introducing new water, making the process more effective. My other concern with the intial solution is how to remove the liner once the pool is refilled; my suggestion would be less effective at ensuring the complete removal of old water but much more efficient with time and effort, I think.
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On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 09:12:42 -0700 (PDT), chris snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

Do they never backwash to clean a filter ? Frequent backwashes prevent the ned to rain it.
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On Thu, 17 Jul 2008 12:44:54 -0500, Peabody

I think this is a valid idea and the version 2.0 where you start with the membrane at the bottom is probably the best.
BTW I agree you should never let your chemicals get this bad and the 50" - 70" of rain a year we get tends to freshen the water but what if your pool was suddenly full of sea water after a hurricane? This might be a way to get it back in shape in a hurry.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

If it was sea water, you would want to start with the membrane at the top and put the fresh water in at the top since the sea water is heavier. With just pool chemicals, I don't think that the density difference would be enough to matter.
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Why not dump a lot of dye in the old water and drain as you add new water. When the color is gone you aregood to go.
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Just be SURE to use the permanent stuff. It works MUCH better.
Steve
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Ah, this is one of the best threads in a long time.
Of course bricks is a silly idea (love the part about Thompson's Water Seal) but strictly speaking, if one were do do that they wouldn't fill the pool with bricks but only a weight equivilent to the level of water needed to secure the pool. A few boards on the bottom to distribute weight evenly and there's no reason for damage since a few tons of bricks should be no different than a few tons of water.
On the other hand with weight only at the bottom if the water table is really high there's nothing to counter side pressure and the sides could bow inward.
Can we add some carpet stretchers going across atop the (sealed!) brick pile to put pressure on the side walls? Hehehe
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