Changing *all* the pool water without lowering the water level

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On Thu, 17 Jul 2008 12:44:54 -0500, Peabody

What is the water table depth, and how long before the pool pops out from pressure?... Drain it fast and fill it.
There are ways to relieve the water table pressure (a hole made for a future drain. Allows the ground water in and plugged for filling the pool.
Many pools sit empty during construction without damage. Think about portions of Florida, below sea level.
Fiberglass is different I'm, sure.
Best I can tell is my water table is about 385 feet below.
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There is not much of Florida that is below sea level, none that I can think of. You are thinking of New Orleans. There is a significant pat that is only a few feet above sea level tho. I am at 11 feet at the finished floor of the house, the pool deck is about a foot loser The water table at my house is about 4 feet below the pool deck right now and the pool is about 8 deep. It will pop out if the water gets low, pretty much immediately. When they dig a pool here they have a big mud pump to keep the water out while they dig. The first thing that goes into a pool excavation is a couple truck loads of gravel and a 2" PVC pipe with slits in it as a water pickup for another big assed pump When they build the pool they pump the water out when they shoot the shell. and there are plugs in the bottom of the drain that go into the gravel under the pool. They let the pool fill with ground water if it is going to sit a while. When they come back to plaster it they pump all the water out again. They keep that pump pulling water out from under the pool until the plastering is done, the plugs are replaced in the drain pan and the pool has started to fill with the fresh water. When they decide the pool is full beyond the water table they disconnect the pump and cap the suction line
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Peabody wrote:

If this is true, how did they dig the hole for the pool and then sink the pool into it in the first place?
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On Thu, 17 Jul 2008 17:39:42 -0400, Harlan Messinger

This is a common issue, Harlan. He's not making it up.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Then I'm all the more curious. *Since* this is true, how did they dig the hole for the pool and then sink the pool into it in the first place?
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Harlan Messinger wrote:

Pump and dewater and then put the fiberglass pool in quick with the crane and start filling it before ground water can start building pressure. You could if you were particularly nuts, drill a shallow well adjacent to and 5-10' deeper than the pool and run a pump in it for a few days to lower the water table in the area at which point you could drain the pool. Ground water is interesting in the way it follows contours.
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He needs to get a cyanuric acid tester to see the level of his stabilizer. Stabilizer will reduce the amount of chlorine that evaporates. Sounds like the algae problem is related to times when the chlorine gasses off, and then the algae grows. Algae can't grow in properly chlorinated water. It's been proven. I would start there. On my pool, I check the stabilizer every year, and remarkably, it is about the same. I don't back flush a lot, but do have incredible buildup of minerals from hard water. At times, I will put an inflow and outflow and "flush" some of the water.
I'd give you a blank stare, too, if you came into my shop and put out your idea. You obviously are well intentioned but not knowledgeable about how it works.
Quit overthinking this. Go get a stabilizer kit and test kit. Get the water right by changing some if you have to or adding additives. Then get the stabilizer level right. Then go swimming. It isn't rocket surgery.
Steve

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On Thu, 17 Jul 2008 12:44:54 -0500, Peabody

Seems like a good plan. It should work well.
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Re Re: Changing *all* the pool water without lowering the water level:

One other point however.
When you have almost completely drained the old water and have the new water sitting on top of the old water and separated by the plastic; will you be able to pull the plastic sheet out? At this point the new water should be pushing the plastic against the sides of the pool quite firmly. I would guess that you will have to cut the plastic into strips to get it out.
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Caesar Romano wrote:

It should pull sideways just fine.
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Pete C. wrote: ...

snicker...chortle...
calculate the weight that will be and the tension required to pull it and then translate to the force/unit area on that film and come back...
--
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dpb wrote:

Wrong, the water (and algae slime) remaining under the plastic is a very good "bearing" and two people pulling the plastic / tarp from one side should have no problem at all removing it. If the plastic was placed with the pool fully dry and then water was added on top it would be different.
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It's just a few thousand gallons of water. How much could it weigh?
Steve
snicker .... chortle ;-)
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wrote:

Yu guys are all wet. The plan is to start with the film on the bottom and shove the filler hose underneth and "float" it to the top.
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on 7/18/2008 7:01 AM Caesar Romano said the following:

First, you have it backwards. The new water is blow the sunken cover. Secondly, when there is water below and above the cover, there will be no pressure pushing on the cover in any direction.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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YADA YADA YADA
The simplest way to change the water and the industry standard is to replace the water with water proof bricks ,bricks must be sealed, Thompsons is good, 2" disposable brush. The bricks will displace the water once the pool is full of bricks start refilling the pool and removing the bricks at the same time kind of a balancing act. You must realize you will only get at best 85% of water out. but that would be enough to get you stabilizer level down. In reality "your friend needs to find another pool supply store to deal with and learn how to take care of a pool correctly.
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Actually, test kits to test stabilizer level are commonly available.
Your friend probably already knows the right routine:
Get the chemical levels right, then use liquid chlorine shock to wipe out the algae.
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Peabody wrote:

Hmm. I'd try some 8' diameter weather balloons.
Fill each with water. When there's no (or very little) water left that's NOT in a balloon, use the specialty tool known as an "ice pick."
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I got certified in '69 and again commercially in '74. It sure is a good way to inspect your pool, fix minor problems before they become major problems, and just cool off.
Steve
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SteveB wrote:

I got certified Jan '07, doing the commercial dive fun weekend thing in a few weeks. It's a good excuse to buy toys and travel. In september I'll be diving in the Red Sea :)
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