Changed one light bulb - now both light bulbs dont work

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Hi,
I have a ceiling fixture that has two bulbs in it. One went out. I replaced it the one that went out, and it worked. I convinced hubby to change the o ther one as well as I am sure it will go out soon. He did, and then both di dnt work. We did a whole series of changing of the lightbulbs, and it appea rs the lights will only turn on if the original working bulb is in its orig inal spot, and a new one installed. If there is no bulb in the original wor k position but a new bulb in the non-working position, no light will turn o n. If there is only a new bulb in the new position or old position, it wont work. Only one configuration seems to work.
Can someone explain? I am not sure if it makes a difference, but the origin al bulbs were incandescent, and the new bulbs purchased are the energy-save r halogen.
I can't make sense of it, but I am sure there is a mathematical reason for it.
Thanks for helping.
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On Mon, 16 Sep 2013 13:39:43 -0700 (PDT), Naomi Cezana

Do the bulbs shine at their full expected brightness? (What happens if two CFLs are connected in series?)
If they do it might be that I had an exorcism at my house a couple nights ago. It worked, but the evil spirits had to go somewhere. Maybe they went to your place.
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wrote:

cause the other to go out.

This sounds more plausible. :)
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On 09/16/2013 04:39 PM, Naomi Cezana wrote:

I can't make sense of it either. Is this a low voltage fixture? Does it use a regular mechanical/electrical wall switch or some kind of electronic switching device? I'm sure we can answer your question but need more details.
nate
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Hi Nate,
It is my regular ceiling fixture that has a 60W limit. It is just a regular light switch on the wall...
On Tuesday, September 17, 2013 6:54:51 AM UTC+10, Nate Nagel wrote:

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Hi,

It might be a mechanical problem. Are the two bulbs mounted back to back ? If so cut off the power and try bending the tab at the bottom of the socket up a little.
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Naomi,
Ralph has given you the answer. It's an easy fix.
Dave M.
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thanks Dave
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On 09/16/2013 05:14 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Upon reflection that seems to be the most likely solution - that, or a loose connection from a pair of wires to the base of one of the sockets (which I haven't ever actually seen - usually the sockets are wired independently.)
nate
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On 9/16/2013 4:39 PM, Naomi Cezana wrote:

Even though the Halogens are energy savings, they may still require a higher load to start them. If your fixture is a 60w limit, that limit could be peaking above that with the halogens. Remember, most lighting, appliances and other electrical device require a higher voltage at start up. I don't know if this is your problem, but it's a possibility. Try using CFLs instead of halogens. You can get 100w output using a 23w CFL.
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if the two sockets are wired in series either on purpose or by mistake, then they might work the way you describe.
Try installing 2 new OLD type incandescent bulbs and see if that works and see if they are not as bright as normal. This would indicate they are wired in series.
Is there a bright / dim switch setting ?
If your sockets are wired in series, then do not use CFLs in there.
Mark
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wrote:

So what? Many fixtures with glass around the light bulbs are rated 60W so that they won't get too hot (and damage the bakelite/plastic or conceivably start a fire) but that doesn't keep the bulb from drawing whatever it needs, up to 150 watts or more.
OTOH, if you use 100W bulbs in a fixture like that, after a few years, the plastic parts of the fixture will crumble. If I'd taken the glass globes off the bulbs, I could have run 100 watts forever, because the rating assumes the glass is in place.

Right. So it can use 150 at start up for a few seconds and then go down to 60 or below and the few seconds it used more than 60 will have practically no effect on how hot it gets inside the glass.

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On 09/16/2013 05:57 PM, Meanie wrote:
[snip]

Voltage? How would that work?
[snip]
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wrote:

Most?

That's the purpose of the ballast.
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On 09/17/2013 02:08 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Where's the ballast in my ceiling fan?
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wrote:

Does you ceiling fan require more voltage to start than to run? I didn't think so.
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On Wednesday, September 18, 2013 2:27:06 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Depends on the use of the word "require."
I'm pretty sure a ceiling fan starts on less voltage than it runs on, because I think the inrush current is enough to drop the supply voltage momentarily.
However, I imagine if you gave it a little extra voltage (capacitor bank, etc.) so that the starting voltage could NOT drop, it would still start fine.
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wrote:

Look at the lights in a ceiling fan and see if they dim or not when the fan is started. I bet not.
I will give it to you that there is a voltage drop before the motor spins up, but it is so small that it will not be noticed. About like putting one more brick on a truck load of bricks. It is there, but the engine will not notice it.
The motor runs on AC and the capacitors would not be able to store any enegery to help the motor every time. It would depend on where in the cycle you start the motor, and if started in the wrong part, would actually reduce the voltage if used like you want them to. Again the reduction would be so slight it would go un noticed.
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wrote:

No, it really doesn't.

Nonsense.

No, the capacitor is used to create a phase shift to get the fan turning (in the desired direction), NOT to increase voltage, which it doesn't.
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On Thursday, September 19, 2013 7:10:01 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

ine.

Yeah, I know what a start capacitor does and what a run capacitor does.
And that's not what I'm talking about. I'm talking about having sufficient voltage supply so as not to have a voltage drop during that tiny period wh ere inrush current makes the voltage sag. I thought of a capacitor in the circuit out of a hazy and imperfect recollection of Maxwell's laws, and the use in power supplies, but it's probably not the best solution.
Regardless, when an AC motor starts, before it starts turning it draws a la rge current, and drawing a large current normally makes voltage sag.
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