Change light in refrigerator

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I bought replacement lamps for my refrigerator. Both bulbs are new and I tested them with a continuity tester to verify them. Neither bulb works in either socket. I also tested the center pin inside the fridge and it is hot (and will go off when I push the door switch).
Without taking the thing down, I can't see into the sockets. One thing I noticed is the shell connections are plastic. There must be a metal pin inside that touches the shell at some point, but I don't see one. I gave the bulbs a pretty strong twist when I put them in. I twisted tighter than I normally would have even tried, but neither bulb will glow.
The fix has to be twist tighter, but I really really made them tight the first time. Anyone else have this problem?
My fridge is a 15 year old Kenmore.
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It sounds to me like you are on the right track. Bulbs are good as verified with an ohm-meter. (You could also double verify by putting into a lamp socket, assuming they have the standard base).
Voltage on the center contact in the fridge socket has been verified and actually goes off via the door switch.
One question here is: Where did you measure the voltage to - one meter lead on the center contact, the other meter lead on ???
Probably you are going to have to get into the socket which you say is plastic, and if you tear it up, replace it with a conventional socket.
These are messy problems.
Bob-tx
and the other lead
About the only thing it can be is no connection
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On Sun, 2 Jan 2011 14:33:34 -0600, "Bob-tx" <No Spam no contact> wrote:

My voltage/continuity tester will glow hot with only one probe touching +12 (I think) I know it will glow on 120V with one lead. It is a Greenlee Voltage and continuity tester 6706. I love it.
They must not sell them anymore. I couldn't find a picture of it or how much they cost.

It turned out to be something embarrassingly simple. The replacement lamps' base connectors are too short. A regular lamp works fine. I almost broke the replacement lamps trying to get them in.
Thanks everyone
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?

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With power off, can you get something under the contact and lift it a bit? Just a 1/16" may do it.
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Twisting tighter is a mistake. It compresses the flexible contact at the bottom of the socket. Then you have to tighten even further, and eventually you compromise the glass to base connection on the bulb.
If you can get to it, usually you can lift that contact tab up with a dry popsicle stick or something similar. (unplug the refrigerator of course) Then once it's bent up a bit, screw in the bulb slowly. When it just lights, turn it exactly 1/8th turn more. Not 1/4 or 1/2 as most people do.
While I've done this successfully on a number of lamp sockets, I've also run into a few where there's just no way to get access. Weird.
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It's ridiculously simple. Just solder the center pin on the lamp with more solder so it sticks out further, then the bulb does not have to be screwed in as far for the center contact to touch.
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It's ridiculously simple. Just solder the center pin on the lamp with more solder so it sticks out further, then the bulb does not have to be screwed in as far for the center contact to touch.
I wish I would of thought of this a few months ago when I tried to install a new light in mine.
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wrote

I agree with Ed on this one. BTDT many times.
Colbyt
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wrote

Good point, I should have thought of that. Bob-tx
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Yes! Jes went through this a couple weeks ago on a 10 yr old Maytag top freezer when a bad fan motor took out all the bulbs when it died.
I has two lights in fridge compartment and one in freezer, all three are the same cheapo crap plastic sockets you describe. I also replaced bulbs, and checked wiring to sockets, all of which were hot. I finally got one bulb in the fridge compartment to work and let it go at that. Jes keep trying to screw it in, very carefully, till it lights. You might try some sorta lubricant, like electronic cleaning fluid w/ lube, taking care to not get it on any food. It really is just those really crappy sockets. Maybe a local appliance parts store would have a suggestion, as I'm sure this is an ongoing problem with today's cheap-ass refrigerators.
nb
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Dielectric grease, same as used on the tail light on your car.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote the following:

I used dielectric grease on my taillight and it fell off the car. :-)
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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wrote:

I used dielectric grease on my car and slid off the road into a tree.
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Thanks for the tip, Ed. I find myself changing the taillights on our mini-motorhome with annoying regularity. Maybe this will help. I also heve an aerosol can of electronic cleaner w/ residual lubricant, but damn if I find it! When I do, I'll report back. ;)
nb
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I use nasal sebum on the base threads of any screw in bulb I'm replacing.
Just rub the threads down the side of your nose where it joins your face and you'll transfer enough of nature's grease to prevent the bulb from siezing in the socket.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nasal_sebum
Jeffry Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE) The speed of light is 1.8*10e12 furlongs per fortnight.
Ed Pawlowski wrote:

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Metspitzer wrote:

Hi, Have you checked the door interlock switch? Both bulbs not working at the same time is suspicious. When you open the door the switch closes supplying juice to the bulbs. Would you think both sockets go bad at the same time? I'd check the switch first.
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Metspitzer wrote:

Do you have the door open?
-Bob
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wrote:

No. I'm typing from inside the refrigerator. It's a good thing I know touch-typing.

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wrote:

I think they were serious when people here discussed nose grease as a lubricant for light bulbs and other things that use the same threads. Apparently most people have this, you just have to rub your nose with a finger and rub the threads. I've never tried it, but I have had sockets which are hard to screw lightbulbs into. Maybe being cold and with food vapors for years makes this worse. I had a socket like that just yesterday, in a non-refrigerated lamp. At the time, I forgot about my nose.
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