Chainsaw Usage Question From First Time Chainsaw User ?

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Robert11 wrote:

You don't say what size saw (inches of bar) and the tree is not that big doesn't mean anything. Not that big means less than 16" diameter to me.
Ok. Safety. Keep both hands on the saw at all times one on the top handle and one on the back handle (where the throttle trigger is. Of course you can't start the saw that way so you put the toe of one foot in the back handle when you pull the rope.
Second. Never let go of the handles until the saw stops and keep other people away. Nothing like whipping around to look at somebody and cutting their leg halfway off when you turn around.
Third. Keep the saw from binding. If you saw down and both ends of the trunk are supported, the trunk will move down at the saw cut and pinch the saw, so make sure you have only one support. Also, look at where the branches support the trunk and figure out which way it is going to roll, or put stuff so that it can't roll. Don't push down hard on the saw, let it do the work. If the saw starts to slow down pull it up out of the cut. If you do get a bind, turn the saw off. Then figure out how to pry the trunk up under the cut so you can pull the saw out. If the saw starts to fall out, let it. That chain is sharp and will cut you if you try to grab it and get the blade.
Fourth. Cut the dam branches away one at a time and move them out of the way. Watch out for branches that support the trunk and cut them last.
Fifth. When you have that chainsaw going, it is the most important thing. You should not give a shit about the telephone, the wife hollering, friends arriving, the dog barking,etc until you shut the saw off and put it on the ground.
Answers. wet and dry don't make any difference. but green wood cuts easier.
Chainsaws don't kickback unless you cut with the tip (don't try this until you get a lot of experience. In fact they don't really kick back they kick up in the air, that's why you must keep a hand on the top handle so you can control it. If you don't cut with the tip, you won't have any problem.
I've never had an accident, came close a couple of times when I was tired, so if you get tired stop and rest.
Good luck.
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I'm not the most experienced guy, but like you I was nervous before I started using a chainsaw and read a lot of posts and read the manual, etc. I have a small electric polesaw.
One thing you should keep in mind is to use the saw in such a way that if it DOES kick back, you won't be in the way. IOW, have your head somewhere other than where the saw could conceivably kick. That will give you more of a sense of being safe. I personally doubt that a little wetness in the wood means you can't saw it.
Keep your wits about you and pay full attention to what you are doing at all times when using a chainsaw. I believe that most chainsaw accidents happen because the user got careless and wasn't thinking about what they were doing. Like most other things, you will gain confidence as you do it. However, don't let that lull you to sleep with complacency.
Dan
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"Dan_Musicant" wrote in message

Excellent advice. What I do is stand to left of the "plane" of the chainsaw bar. When a kickback happens, the tip of the bar can go up into the air and toward you. If you are not standing in the vertical path of where the bar would go if it went straight up, then you are more likely to avoid injury.
Also I wrap my thumbs *under* the bar and handle when holding the chainsaw and always hold the saw with both hands. Wrapping your thumbs under the handles, especially your left hand, will protect your left hand from slipping off the top bar in the event of a "push back". This is when the log you are cutting closes at the top of the cut and binds the top portion of the saw chain.
And while cutting, I stand with my legs spread apart for forward and backward support. (So someone could push me or pull me from behind and I would not fall forward or backward.) This is for a "pull-in" situation where the bottom portion of the cut closes in on the chain and the saw then wants to pull you forward. I don't want to be falling forward onto the chain.
Also I have my own "two foot minimum airspace" behind what I am cutting rule. If there is a pile of logs to be cut, I remove a log from the pile and place it so there is nothing but airspace behind that log for two feet. This protects from accidental "kick-up" where the upper end of the bar accidentally contacts a piece of wood behind the piece you are cutting and the bar then flies up into the air. It also protects from a "combination pull-in - kick-up" situation where the cut closes on the bottom of the chain, the saw is pulled forward, then contacts a piece of wood behind what you are cutting, then the bar flies up into the air.
Just understanding what can happen while cutting with a chainsaw (reactive forces), then standing properly, and holding the saw properly, can go a long way toward avoiding injury should a kickback happen.
Then advanced cutting is learning how to cut to keep the cut from closing on the chain, keep logs from rolling over you, keep limbs under tension from flying up and hitting you, etc. Here is some info on this...
Felling and Bucking Techniques for Woodland Owners... http://www.survivalprimer.com/Homestead/Logging_Felling_&Bucking.pdf
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Lets hope you are right handed. The bar is on the right side of the saw. The safe usage is to keep the bar as far to the right as you comfortably can. So, if the saw kicks back it goes over your right shoulder, instead of through your head.
I've seen guys with the blade right in line with their face. DUMB!!!
--

Christopher A. Young
Do good work.
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