Chainsaw Usage Question From First Time Chainsaw User ?

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Hello:
Have just bought a gas powered chainsaw to try and cut up a tree trunk that fell in my yard. Not that large, but too much for a hand saw.
Have never used a chain saw before. Frankly, it scares the heck out of me; not looking forward to using it.
Anyway, have this question:
It's been raining a bit here. Should the trunk be "totally" dry before trying to cut it up, or, as the rain water probably never penetrates more than an inch or so, I would expect, it really doesn't matter ?
Or, does it ?
Would there be more chance of a "kickback" if wet ?
What should I probably be asking ?
Any hints would be most appreciated.
Thanks, Bob
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Hello:
Have just bought a gas powered chainsaw to try and cut up a tree trunk that fell in my yard. Not that large, but too much for a hand saw.
Have never used a chain saw before. Frankly, it scares the heck out of me; not looking forward to using it.
Anyway, have this question:
It's been raining a bit here. Should the trunk be "totally" dry before trying to cut it up, or, as the rain water probably never penetrates more than an inch or so, I would expect, it really doesn't matter ?
Or, does it ?
Would there be more chance of a "kickback" if wet ?
What should I probably be asking ?
Any hints would be most appreciated.
Thanks, Bob
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Hello:
May be a duplicate. OE acting up again
Have just bought a gas powered chainsaw to try and cut up a tree trunk that fell in my yard. Not that large, but too much for a hand saw.
Have never used a chain saw before. Frankly, it scares the heck out of me; not looking forward to using it.
Anyway, have this question:
It's been raining a bit here. Should the trunk be "totally" dry before trying to cut it up, or, as the rain water probably never penetrates more than an inch or so, I would expect, it really doesn't matter ?
Or, does it ?
Would there be more chance of a "kickback" if wet ?
What should I probably be asking ?
Any hints would be most appreciated.
Thanks, Bob
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that
me;
matter
If a tree fell in your yard (presumably from weather), did any neighbors have the same problem? If so, keep watch out your window, and when one of them starts to cut up their tree, go out and watch, and ask questions. Explain that you just bought a saw, and need some 'chainsawing for dummies' lessons. Most chain saw owners I know love to show them off, and in exchange for a little work carrying logs as they are cut, would likely be happy to give a little instruction.
Seriously, this is one of the typical homeowner tools that can hurt you Real Bad if you aren't paying attention. Boots, leather gloves, and eye and ear protection are called for. If you can't find an actual live human to get a lesson from, check the library or bookstore (or Amazon) for 'how to' books or tapes. Somebody probably has a website, even. (Checks Google) Try http://muextension.missouri.edu/xplor/agguides/agengin/g01959.htm , the first of several thousand hits searching on 'how to use a chainsaw'.
Once you get past the fear, chainsaws can be fun. Hope they sold you a sharpening kit with the saw- those chains can get dull fast.
aem sends...
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Hello:
Much thanks for all the info. Really appreciate it. Just what i wanted.
Bob
--------------

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Robert11 wrote:

There is not really a problem cutting wet wood at all, but since you have never used a chainsaw before you might want to wait for a dry day just so you have your footing and everything is as dry as posible for your initial use.
Rob NE PA, USA
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wrote:

Apparently you've never used the usnet either.
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Robert, If you've never used a chainsaw before and you are afraid of it, you are scaring me too. Have a healthy respect for equipment, do not be afraid of it. Always keep a firm grip on the saw, you need to control it, not allow it be in control.
If you have limited saw experience, make sure that the piece that is being cut off can fall to the ground. This may require rolling, blocking, raising the limb and resting it on a piece of log or other solid material. Be very cautious and keep a firm grip if you are cutting off small branches and off-shoots. They should be removed before sawing the main log.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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Good! Using a chainsaw should scare the heck out of you. But with proper use, you can greatly reduce your risk of injury.
Just take your time. This is one thing where it is good to read all the safety precautions in your instructuion manual.
I live in the Pacific Northwest where it rains, rains, rains. So I am frequently cutting wet wood and doing so while it is raining. I don't have any problems with this.
I hope you are not in a hurry to use your chainsaw and will take some time to read some of the following...
Learning how to use a chainsaw...
The following are all excellent sources for learning how to use a chainsaw.
Common chainsaw injury locations on body - diagram. (1/2 way down page)... http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/logging/manual/logger/personal_equip/personal_equip.html
Stihl DVD: "Chain Saw Safety, Operation & Maintenance"... http://www.stihlusa.com/knowhow/knowhow_lit_video.html
"Oregon Maintenance and Safety Manual" on-line book... http://www.oregonchain.com/tech/manual_maint.htm
OSHA Logging eTool... (Manual logging or mechanical logging) http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/logging/mainpage.html
Book: "Professional Timber Falling" By Douglas Dent http://onlinestore.forestindustry.com/cgi-bin/baileys/catch.html?product
National Timber Harvesting and Transportation Safety Foundation Logging Safety Web Site... http://www.loggingsafety.com
The Game of Logging... http://www.gameoflogging.com
Stihl Instruction Manuals... http://www.stihlmanuals.w1.com/stihl_ownersmanuals/ownersmanuals_listing.html
Stihl - Guide to Saw Chain Maintenance... http://www.stihllibrary.com/pdf/SharpAdvice061301final.pdf
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I see you have already been directed tot he Stihl web site. That is a good start.
Wet wood is not a problem, but wet ground can be. Be sue you have good footing before you crank up the saw.
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I have a small chainsaw, and it's not powerful enough to kick back at all. The chain just jams. Of course, your experience may differ. But don't be quite as scared of the chainsaw as these posters are suggesting. Use a chainsaw in good working order with a sharp chain, keep your feet on the ground, cut so the wood doesn't pinch the chain, and you'll do fine. -B

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"Em" wrote in message

What brand and model of chainsaw do you have?
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If it's powerful enough to cut a log, it's powerful enough to kick back!
Pat
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wrote:

Man, that is so true. I have a little Stihl and it wants to kick back under certain situations. I've never cut myself (yet) but I did wrench my shoulder so bad that it took around three years, three trips to the orthopedist, and six visits to the acupuncturist to get it to stop aching.
I bought a logger's helmet to wear when I use mine. It is a regular hard hat with sound-blocking earmuffs attached to it and a face screen that pulls down (it's a real screen, not a clear plastic shield so it doesn't fog up). Looks REAL dorky, but it offers all kinds of face, ear, and head protection, and because it's easy to put on you are actually inclined to use it. I got it from Northern.
Of course, this does nothing for leg protection. You need some sort of chaps for that. I finally bought some a few years ago, and I hate 'em but I wear 'em.
I've used chain saws off and on since I was about 16 and the biggest problem I have found with my own use is that if I don't watch out I get too focused on the cutting and watching the blade work. This is not good, and I have to constantly remind myself to look around and keep alert for shifting limbs, brush and blade hazards, as well as keeping a solid footing and position when cutting. You have to sort of "set up" the cuts before you start them. Maybe it's just me, but I find it's oddly easy -- too easy -- to zone out running the thing and just slice away at whatever branch or log is within reach. Next thing I know, the bar is pinched inside a big branch or trunk, and the saw stops abruptly (if I'm lucky).
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(snip) .. Maybe it's just me, but I

Chuckle- the 'Tim Taylor' syndrome- More Power! Can apply to any tool- I just got a leaf blower, and ended up peeling back some sod trying to unstick some old leaves.
aem sends...
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On Sun, 06 Nov 2005 23:02:15 GMT, "ameijers"

Hee hee. It gets worse as you get older, by the way.
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Any chainsaw will kick back. Kickback has nothing to do with power, it has to do with how you use it. Most important aspects are good footing, good grip and think about what you're doing before you do it. No distractions.
--
hwm54112
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hwm54112 wrote:

That's right. Kickback also varies with the bar profile, type of chain, raker depth, etc.
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Every now and again, glance at the tip of the bar. The tip should not be touching anything.
--

Christopher A. Young
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that
<snip>
If this is your only forseable use for a saw have you considered renting one? One other thought... by the time you but the saw and the safety gear you just might be able to have a neighbor do it for a lot less money and nicked up shins. OTOH, if you plan on owning a home and forsee the need for a saw you have a wealth of info on this thread. I enjoy using my saw but I never lose respect for its capabilities to do the unexpected.
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