Chainsaw sharpening

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I have read about sharpening chainsaws, and it all runs from simple to "you could put yer eye out, Kid!"
I have a craftsman device that holds the proper angle, but am looking for the manual or download. Husky provided a simple thing that is about one inch cube that lines it up pretty close.
I have seen, and have heard people say that once you get the angle right, it's just a matter of a few strokes. I also need to find that little cube to set the rakers, and make sure they are not too high.
What's the short answer for DIY saw sharpening?
Steve
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Visit any saw dealer and buy a depth gauge file guide - at most a few bucks - for the rakers.
I've done 10 plus cords for the past 30 or more years and still use a file guide that sets all the angles. Others do a great job free hand.
Real secret? File befoe the chain is dull. Only takes a few strokes then. Takes me about 10 minutes to do a 20" loop. When the saw requires down force to cut it is time (actually past time) to file.
Harry K
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Forgot to add:
Use a sharp file. I change them often and buy by the dozen from Baileys (baileysonline.com)
Harry K
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Steve B wrote:

A few firm strokes on each tooth with a sharp file does it for me. I clamp the blade in my vise, then carefully line the file up with the cut of the tooth, then stroke. Apply pressure with the forward stroke - no pressure on the return stroke, which will just dull the file. Do all the proper alternateing teeth from one side, then do the other teeth from the other side. Do several teeth, then move the chain for access to the next set.
Apply the pressure so as to file the cutting edge of the tooth, not to cut deeper into the tooth. Along the blade rather than into the blade. I believe I choose the side to file from so that the file as I stroke is pushing from the back of the blade towards the tip slightly, rather than the reverse. It tends to chatter if done the reverse way.
Make sure you have the proper size chainsaw file for your chain.
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You might use that for a while- but it becomes a pain & I'll bet you toss it and just eye the angle up after a bit.

Check out a new chain & note how much space between the top of the rakers and teeth when you lay a straight edge across. Maintain that space, more or less. Maybe hit the rakers about every half dozen touch-ups.

The file is the most important part- buy them in bulk and replace often. You probably already have an 'eye' for seeing the angle. Get a good small file for the rakers.
Do it often. Keep a couple or three chains going so you don't waste time sharpening when the sun is shining.
If the saw starts to run one way or the other & the fix isn't obvious drop the chain off at the guy with the machine & start over with the touch-ups.
Jim
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Steve B wrote:

You get the right size round file for sharpening chains, 5/32, 9/64 or 13/64. Put the bar in a vice, mark the chain with a scribe or felt marker so you know when you've been all the way around. Then file every other tooth in one angle then every other tooth in the other angle. I just sharpen free style and have good luck. Just maintain the same angle and a couple of file strokes is all it takes. Don't hit nails, barbed wire (embeded in the wood), rocks etc and it lasts a long time.
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How do I avoid those things?
Steve
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Errmmm...time travel? Hasn't worked for me yet :)
Harry K
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Errmmm...time travel? Hasn't worked for me yet :)
Harry K
Sorry, he just stated to avoid the rocks, nails, barbed wire, etc, like it was a thing that one would intentionally aim for, and should not.
Steve
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That was a semi-serious joke. I actually had in mind the many times I have hit things embedded withing the wood that are not visible. My favorite one was taking down a snag in a fencerow - visible scars indicated embedded wirres. So I cut 6" above the top one and hit a jacketed bullet. That is one of the reasons I carry several sharp chains. Lot faster to change out a chain than it is to file in the field.
Harry K
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On 01/30/2010 02:57 PM, Steve B wrote:

Sometimes it's unavoidable with embedded metal and trees that were dragged through the mud and gravel and have rocks embedded in the bark. If you have this problem a lot, get a second chain you use only for junk wood.
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I live in sand dunes. Anything transported here accumulates sand within twenty minutes. When sawing, I have to take a sledge and hit the log a few times, and that makes it only slightly better. Hence, I need a quick field app to keep my chains sharp.
Steve
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Some people say they will 'ax' the bark off at the cut location - that is bit too anal for my blood.
Harry K
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My 2c. I freehand with a dremel as well. Also freehand the cut depth with the dremel and a regular stone. Chain's not a precision instrument, as long as you're in the ballpark it works fine. I can do an 18" bar in about 5 minutes. I keep sharpening them over and over until I can't get the cut depth low enough. Then I save one or two for those jobs where you know you are going to ruin a chain, like down in a creek. Or in a hole.
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Stihl chainsaw dealers sell a Stihl DVD called "Chain Saw Safety, Operation & Maintenance".
This includes information on properly sharpening a chain.
"Steve B" wrote in message

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On 1/29/2010 11:01 PM, Steve B wrote:

You'll put your eye out, kid.
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On Fri, 29 Jan 2010 21:01:00 -0800, "Steve B"
The short answer is "Dremel tool and the right stone for your chain". I had 2 file and gauge type sharpeners and I will never use them again. I gave the nice one away and I keep the simple one in the box in case I don't have power.
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wrote:

About a year ago, I saw Dremel stones in a thrift shop for a dime apiece. There were about a dozen. Inch to inch and a quarter long, small diameter. They have a hole in them, but no shaft. I believe they are the same diameter as my file. I will check tomorrow. Does Dremel make a shaft that you move from stone to stone? It would have to be perfectly centered to work right. If not that, I have a big set of carbide burrs, and maybe one of those would be the same diameter. I have talked to a couple of people who had the Dremels, one with a battery operated one, IIRC, and they said they were the cat's meow. I have a Foredom shaft drive that I could use instead of the DeWalt 18.
Steve
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On Sat, 30 Jan 2010 21:33:05 -0800, "Steve B"

The ones I have are purpose built for sharpening chain saws and the stem is on the stone. There are 3 sizes so be sure you get the one to go with your chain. They were 2 for $7 at Ace Hardware the last time I bought them I think most rotary tools use the same bits.
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On Jan 30, 9:18pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Don't you need the guide to set the depth of the stone also?
Harry K
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