chainsaw reccomendation or advice ?

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On Wed, 28 Sep 2011 18:13:00 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Is that since they started using E-10?
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On Thu, 29 Sep 2011 00:48:20 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Canada is E0, so that's what I generally use. I did have LL100 Avgas for a while.
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Don't cut off your hand.
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My old German father always used to say "Buy it right, once.". Buy a Stihl. Dick in Ferris, TX
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Dick Keats wrote:

How about a Sachs-Dolmar? That's a German saw too, and I believe they are a little cheaper than a comparable Stihl.
-Bob
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When my 30 year old Poulan bit the dust I bought a small Echo like Home Depot sells. It's about a 14" bar length. The thing I don't like about it is that it uses a much narrower chain then the poulan did which has made it very easy for the chain to come off at the slightest twisting of the bar while cutting if there is even the least amount of looseness in the chain. Never had the problem with the Poulan. So if I was in the market again I'd pay attention to the chain width. Othr then that the Echo seems fine for my occasional use.
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robb wrote:

If I were you I'd buy Stihl or Echo. I have both Echo at home and Stihl out at my cabin. They won't let you down and it will last long time.
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Do you think all opinions you read here are going to be unanimous!?

Popular Mechanics has several comparisons and reviews. Here's one for what you seem to be looking for:
http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/reviews/power-tools/stihl-ms-230-c-be-review
Note the comments about the carbide chain.
I have no experience using chainsaws, whatsoever, but being a combustion engine freak, I always read other people's opinions/reviews with interest. Seems Stihl and Husqvarna are the two biggies and both are considered top quality by pros and DIY'ers alike. It will probably come down to what which one you like the feel of. You should try both out beforehand by renting one and actually using it.
Tool rental places often have more than one brand and/or model of chainsaw, it being an extremely popular rental item. As a long-ago tool rental mechanic, I can guarantee it's the one place you can go to discover a tool's shortcomings. I can also tell you the biggest maintenance issue with chain saws is constantly sharpening the cutting teeth. Make sure whichever brand you get, the chain is easily accessable and removeable. Also inquire about chain sharpening tools, cuz you'll damn sure be using them. That's why that carbide chain sounded like a good thing. OTOH, while carbide last for a long time, it's even more difficult to sharpen. Good luck.
nb
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On 9/23/2011 10:15 AM, robb wrote:

Go ahead, buy a cheap piece-of-shit Chinasaw...and when it craps out after half a day's use, then go to a Stihl dealer and buy a real chainsaw.
Seriously, I used to buy chinasaws from lowes depot. In my opinion, chinasaws are pure junk. They don't start easily, they don't idle right, they don't run right at high speed, they vibrate like hell and their cheap chinasaw chains constantly stretch and come off. Chinasaws are more trouble than they're worth!
Do yourself a favor - go buy a Stihl.
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I can tell you this, do NOT buy a Homelight. They are a piece of junk.
I made about 25 cuts with one and it crapped out. Took it back to HD and got a Poulan Wood Shark. I haven't had any problems with it, but a lot of people in here frown on Poulan.
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Son and I had problems with both our Poulan Wild Things. Would not buy another Poulan or any other chain saw advertised for occassional use. Only good thing with HD is that they refunded son's purchase after about 3 months.
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Jonsered, Husky, Stihl, Echo are the better brands. 50 years ago it was Homelite...very good but not light weight.
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robb wrote:

Echo makes good saws, but they are a little underpowered for the number of cubic inches -- that just means they are detuned a little, which probably adds to their longevity. As far as I know, all Echo saws are "professional" saws, but perhaps low-end pro. Stihl and Husqvarna sell multiple grades of saws, and the lowest grade of Husky (models 235 and 240) are just rebranded Poulans painted orange, although they appear to have better air filters.
Northern Tool has rebuilt Husky 435's (that model is made in Sweden) on sale right now for considerably less than $200. That's probably the best deal around. Next would be an Echo 440 or 500 from Home Depot.
-Bob
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By the description of what you want to do with one, you need a quality saw. Stay away from all the el cheapo's. Your targt price for a saw that will probably stand up to the work is $300 or above.
The cheap saws are all plastic and flimsy plastic at that. My neighbor bought at Wild Thing and asked me to show him how to use a chainsaw. Right out of the box it would not run. I have been using saws for over 30 years and nothing I could do would make it run more than a few seconds after it ran out the 'choke' charge.
The chain brake handle broke with out any rough handling. Snapped off one side right at the pivot bolt.
The other el cheapos are about the same quality.
You reallyshould buy from a regular dealer because with that use you _will_ going back for service.
Bottom line "the joy of cheap price is paid for by the sorrow of poor quality"
Harry K
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After a couple of years, the Husqvana I had would not start until I made up a fresh can of gas for it every time. It would not start at all with gas that I had mixed up just the day before. I heard that that was common with that brand so I got rid of it. Now, for what little I've been doing lately, I use an axe or a saw. Great exercise for this old feller.
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wrote:

After a couple of years, the Husqvana I had would not start until I made up a fresh can of gas for it every time. It would not start at all with gas that I had mixed up just the day before. I heard that that was common with that brand so I got rid of it. Now, for what little I've been doing lately, I use an axe or a saw. Great exercise for this old feller.
reply:
A 26 ton splitter works fine, too. After having my sternum split into two pieces by some kind of special bone splitter the doctor uses, it hasn't been up to splitting any wood. I mean I can still do it manually, but why? I can still do a lot of things, a lot of them pretty hard, such as metalworking. But for splitting a few tons of wood, I'll take the easy way out.
You do whatever winds your clock.
Steve
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Well, if I was cutting tons of wood I would use a different tool. The wood I burn to heat the house these days comes in pellets in 45 pound bags. That winds my clock.
The big willow tree in my yard does cause me some extra work after a wind storm or ice storm tho.
-C-
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Stay the hell out of the big box stores and buy from someone who stocks parts and makes repairs, your saw will be properly set up and the money tends to stay in town. You don't need anything bigger than a 16" bar, the high revving engines now 13,000 rpm cut very well and a bigger saw is just bigger aches and pains at the end of the day. The midrange of saws would be the ms290 aka farm boss by Stihl but it's a lot heavier than what you need.
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I bought a 16" bar Husky, and if I had it to do again, I would go no smaller than 18", and probably would get a 20. If I had it to do again, I would get a Stihl, but am happy with my Husky now I learned how to start it. Pull it and give it no gas until it has fired and is running. Probably in the directions, but I seem to have misplaced them ........ Like any tool, there's always some situation every once in a while when you need that little extra.
Steve
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On 9/24/2011 1:15 PM, Steve B wrote:

I know this defies all odds but I fired up the crapsman/Poulan today for the first time since spring. Third pull it fired up like usual and ran fine. The only thing wrong with it is the chain doesn't stay tight. That's my only complaint in about 10 years. It was a returned unit that was repaired, on clearance, for $50. It's probably only cut about a cord of wood a year. A year or two ago I replaced the clutch because the teeth were worn from me running it with the chain either too tight and/or too loose. Now they have a different way of adjusting the chain tension and I'm tempted to get a new one but the posts I read here tell me I'd be crazy to expect to get a 2nd one that actually works. Did I really get the one in a million that actually works?
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