Chainsaw blade sharpened?

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ng_reader wrote:

"Wild Thing" is the actual Poulan name for the chainsaw. I have one and oil pump went under warranty so I had it sharpened while in the shop and just resharpen with file as others suggest. Maybe not as sharp as shop made it. Slow cutting and burnt wood was my observation too the last time I used it. I had taken to son's house to help remove a downed tree and did not have file.
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ng_reader wrote:

Two points:
Sharpening the chain while it's on the saw avoids whatever time it takes to remove and replace the chain. Keeping a spare chain on hand is a great idea to let you complete your work in case you really f-up the one on the saw.
Don't forget about the depth guides between the cutting teeth. As you sharpen the teeth they get a little shorter and you need to occassionally reduce the height of the depth guides so the teeth can do their job.
*******
I use a Dremel with a chain sharpening stone on the little 16" electric chain saw I've had for about 20 years now and which only gets used maybe twice a summer nowadays. The spare chain I bought along with the saw is still in its unopened package. :)
Jeff
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Chainsaw sharpening IS somewhat exacting, but it ain't rocket surgery. Those fellas who work day in and day out logging carry a file, and can get one back into shape in a real hurry. They also carry spare chains that they have sharpened professionally, or do on a home bench mounted sharpener.
One of the biggest thing you can do is avoid dulling. Blades dull with the wear of cutting wood, but hitting a rock or the dirt will dull it in about three seconds. Knowing how to avoid those places is key.
As for sharpening, it all depends on how much you cut. We went and got two cords last weekend. I took my saw and three extra chains, and didn't have to switch to the second one. On a bad day, I could have been into the third one. If you're a weekend tree trimmer, or occasional user to cut firewood, and are always close to the hardware store, it is wise to just have a couple of extras. About $20 or less each, and about $4 to have professionally sharpened. If you go out in the woods, and dulling all your chains will put you in a bind, then you have to learn how to do it, or buy some kind of accurate sharpener. Sharpening a chain too much because you don't know what you're doing is just going to wear all the metal away, and ruin the chain. One does not need to take a lot of metal off to sharpen a chain, but the angles are critical.
HTH
Steve
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On Tue, 23 Sep 2008 14:46:16 -0400, "ng_reader"

Hey! Look whats' on special right now!
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber“213
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On Sep 24, 5:40 am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

I got one the year they put them up for $39.99. Not worth the money IMO but maybe I got a bad one. It is a bit flimsy and mine does not sharpen the teeth on both sides to the same lenght. I have to play around with the 'tooth stop' and a micrometer to get it right after changing sides. Others who have bought them are satisfied however.
If anyone does buy one, order up a couple extra wheels at the same time. Also visit a good hardware site or store for a "wheel dressing" 'stone'. Then before using a new wheel, hold a piece of thick carstock against it to get the right profile and file that card away so you can refer to it when dressing the wheel.
Harry K
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Take your chain down to a good hardware store and get a round file to fit your chain, a sharpening guide that clamps on to the file and you are in business.
I had never sharpened a chain saw chain but within 10 minutes, I had sharpened the chain. There really isn't much to it especially if you have a vice to hold the chain saw bar steady when the chain is mounted on the saw. After you have done it a few times, you can carry the file with you and sharpen as necessary right on the job site.
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Anybody remember that chain that 'sharpened itself'? IIRC a special chain and an attachment. Seem to recall the teeith were shaped completely differently and as the chain ran an attachment touching the chain sharpened it. Also seem to recall that it was not successful, or universally accepted and it has disappeared? Curious.
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Buy the tool once, sharpen the chain 20 times: $20 Buy 20 chains: $400 Being smarter than the log you're trying to cut: Priceless
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Incorrect cutting methods?
And if you wanna take the time, you can sharpen the chain with a small "rattail" file.
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definition of an 'unsharp' chain??? one that hasn't been sharpened since the last use.
s
wrote:

Incorrect cutting methods?
And if you wanna take the time, you can sharpen the chain with a small "rattail" file.
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I presume you are using bar oil, and that the bar oil is properly feeding onto the chain?
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