chain saw oil

The original instructions for my electric chain saw said to use SAE 30 oil for temps under 75 degrees F, and SAE40 for temps over that**. It's a Remington 16 inch, 10.5 amps, and iirc 2.5 HP.
But they sell bar and chain oil. The label says it "contains a tackiness additive to help oil stay on chainsaw bars and chains". Do I have to use that, or can I use some straight 30 weight that I already have? Does it make a difference that I use this saw very very little, or that I bought it at a yard sale for cheap?
Can I use an electric, or gas, chainsaw to cut T-11 siding, or other non-tree items?
Thanks a lot.
**And SAE20 for temps under 32 iirc.
Meirman
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Meirman,
Oil has various properties which are listed on the packaging. Your owner's manual should describe the oil to be used. As an example they might recommend non-detergent 30 SAE, API. You can, of course, ignore these recommendations but if it breaks blame yourself. I don't know what T-11 siding is but chainsaws are meant to cut wood in a rough fashion so if T-11 is wood and a rough, chipped cut is ok. Any pawn shop will have a selection of circular saws and sabre saws though
Good luck, Dave M.
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wrote:

I'm surprised Remington's instructions are so finicky! I've never owned an electric chainsaw, but I can't imagine that they would be more demanding gas saws--of which I own two, a small, 30 year old Stihl (still runs fine) and a newer and larger Husqvarna.
There was a period of several years that I had trouble finding bar-and-chain oil for the Stihl and so simply used whatever oil I was putting in my automobiles at the time. Seemed to work fine.

I dunno what "T-11" is either, but guessing it's some sort of wood-glue-resin kinda product, it might be pretty hard on the chain, sharpness-wise. But, heck, people use chainsaws to dig trenches (with special chains).
--JWW
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Add me to the list. I also have no idea what T-11 is ???? However, I only use electric chainsaws. The gas ones never start, so screw them,,,,, The chain on an electric CS is exactly the same thing as the ones on the gas saws, except usually shorter. Treat them the samw way. Bar -Chain oil is better, but in a pinch, plain motor oil works, just shoot a little more of it on the chain, because it goes away faster. I cut any and all kinds of wood, whether trees, or lumber. But, DO NOT cut plywood, particle board, or any non-wood things. They will dull the chain. Use a sawsall for that stuff. And, of course, hitting a nail WILL ruin the chain.
On Mon, 15 Nov 2004 13:27:33 -0800, John W. Wells

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T1-11 is a wood siding. Rough on one side and grooved. You can cut it with a chain saw, but it is not very accurate or smooth. Circular saw would be best.
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This is Turtle.
30 Weight oil goes in your lawn mower and Chain Saw Bar Oil goes on the chain saw bar. Bar Oil usely is about a 90 weight gear oil of some type.
I can be wrong here by saying this but 30 weight oil does not belong on a chain saw Bar. If you do this then you might use WD-40 in your lawn mower as oil.
Now I only use gas saws and electric might be a different story but I dought it.
TURTLE
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TURTLE wrote:

I sometimes use light hydralic fluid for my chainsaw bars when it's much below zero outside. When it's not so cold, I use Bar and Chain Oil. I think in extremely cold weather you're supposed to thin the bar and chain oil with a little bit of kerosene, but I've got a big jug of hydralic fluid to use up and it seems to work OK.
Bob
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TURTLE wrote:

Turtle, most of your advice is right on, but in this case it isn't. Bar oil is nowhere near 90 weight based on how it pours, more like 10W-40. and it has some heavy duty stick-um in it so they probably start with 30 or 20 weight.
Even transmission fluid with a little Motor Honey works well, but any mixture of oils with Motor Honey that pours about like 30 or 40 weight will work. But you could probably use 90 weight if you have the money.
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This is Turtle.
After the education on Viscosty of the chain oil. It can be 5 weight but when you pour it out it is very thick like 90 weight gear oil and maybe like 50/50 mix of STP and 20 weight oil. What ever the weight of it is , it's very thick to stick to the chain and bar so well. ALSO
The Log Haulers and log cutters don't or will not use 20-W-40 motor oil for it will let the bar burn up when cutting a long time and getting hot. They run the saws 6 to 8 hour a day running just about all the time and the bar's will start to ridge up on the slide of the chain with plain motor oil. The Bar gets hot and will start to heat up to a point where it will eat the ridge out of the bar with the plain motor oil. With plain motor oil the bar will last you about a week and if you use bar oil you can get 3 months out of a Bar. Here is Louisiana they don't get to cut in cold weather for it will stay in the 90's to above 100ēF all summer. All winter it stays in the 60's to 80'sēF . In cold weather you might get away with motor oil but not when it is hot and running it all day.
Yes My Brother in law is a *** Flate head. He drives a Oil tanker truck now and said he was tired of getting hit in the head by trees.
TURTLE
*** Flate Head --- A person who cuts logs for a living and has had a lot of trees fall on their head and their head is flate on top.
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My small engine repair teacher told us all that the official chain saw bar oil is far superior to straight weights. Sticky, and stays on the bar instead of flying off the handle (sorry).
I've used a chainsaw to saw packing skids. But have to be very careful not to hit nails, the chain will dull nearly instantly.
--

Christopher A. Young
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Chain oil costs from $4 to $40 a gallon. I buy a modest brand rather than use waste oil or anything else that has potential harm. There are also biodegradable oils.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Bar oil at $40 a gallon? Walmart sells Poulan oil for less than $3 a gallon and I have never seen any store selling bar oil for more than $10 a gallon and that is rare.
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Check here: http://www.farm-home.com/ldr/JB20221628.htm
It may be the $3 stuff with a different label.
I don't remember what I paid, but is was probably $5 or less.
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wrote in message

This is Turtle.
Hey That's the stuff NAPPA Sells Gold Band for chain saws here and it $4.99 a gal. . $40.00 a Gal. WOW .
TURTLE
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wrote in message

It just -has- to be a misprint in the catalog. No way can it be right. For that price it should cut all your firewood without even using the saw.
Harry K
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wrote in message

This is Turtle.
I think it is just a Type-0 for they put a zero inbetween the 4 and the decimal of $4.99 .
TURTLE
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meirman wrote:

Use any 30 weight oil, but you should add some the old motor additives such as STP or Motor Honey. Considering that Wall Mart sell as gallon of chainsaw oil for less than 3 dollars, that seems to be a good bet. The motor Honey will probably cost $2 plus for a small container.
Yes you can cut any plywood type siding, but the cut will be very rough with a chain saw. If you are installing T1-11, a circular saw would be highly preferred.
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