Chain Saw Cutting Problem

I have a 009 Stihl saw, 12 or 14 inch blade. It cuts find to about an inch and a half, but then it acts like the chain is dull or something. Cutting the rest of the way through a limb takes a lot of doing.
I notice that the bar at the bottom is not in good shape. It's worn down and spread out a little. So I turned the bar over to the good side, and that didn't help.
The saw is 20 years old. The bar is probably 10.
Thanks,
Mike
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make sure you did not installed chain backwards!
or just try changing cutters direction
Brian
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On Mon, 18 Apr 2005 01:01:07 GMT, "Michael"

New chain!
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Yup.
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On Mon, 18 Apr 2005 01:40:33 GMT, "Michael"

Why don't you wait until the chain shows signs of getting dull before you sharpen it? It could last a lot longer.
And I'm concerned about your bar. Are you sure your oiler is working properly? I'm afaid you have overheated your bar and softened the metal.
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I brought a saw in for a problem of not cutting well with new chain and engine running good. He took one look and took the chain off the saw and filed the mushroom chain tracking groove on the bar to be flate. He put the chain back on it and it cut fine. If the mushroom part of the bar gets bigger than the chain groove it cuts. The bar will not go through the hole the chain cuts.
Just something to look at.
TURTLE
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wrote:

The chain is about a year old. I give it a quick sharpen about every other tank of gas. I'm getting little wood chips, not sawdust, so I didn't think it would be the chain. I can try another, though, thanks.
Mike
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Michael wrote:

Sounds like the depth gauges on the chain need to be filed down a bit.
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Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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All good stuff, guys, thanks. Yeah, I thought the bar was getting bigger than the chain groove, so I turned the bar over and used the other side. (Yeah, the chain is in the right direction!) I thought that was the answer for sure, but it didn't help that much, if at all.
That worries me too, how that you mention it, that the bar might be getting too hot and not getting enough oil. I'll clean it out to make sure it's getting enough, but I can tell you that the bar oil level goes down about right every time I fill up. But maybe the bar oil is going to the wrong place.
I guess I'll take it to the shop and let the guys there have a look at my bar.
Thanks again.
Mike
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I don't know anything about this. Any chance you can give me a short tutorial or a web page?
Thanks,
Mike
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Michael wrote:

On the cutter link of the chain, there is the blade (or cutter) on the back part, and on the front of the link is a piece that sticks up and keeps the blade from cutting into the wood too deeply. This is the depth gauge. As you sharpen the cutter, it gets cut down lower and lower. Every 4 or five times that you sharpen the cutter, you have to file down the depth gauge so that the cutter can bite into the wood at the correct depth.
Here is a pretty good tutorial. Scroll down to the chainsaw sharpening guide at the bottom of the page.
<http://www.motherearthnews.com/library/2002_October_November/Keeping_Your_Chainsaw_Sharp
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Rimshot, Inc.
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<http://www.motherearthnews.com/library/2002_October_November/Keeping_Your_Chainsaw_Sharp
Robert,
Thanks.
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20 yrs old, a weak motor with low compression.
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Michael wrote:

Most likely cause: Chain misfiled and it's trying to cut in a curve. If it only goes in that far before binding, the chain is really in need of a professional touchup. Take it to a chainsaw shop or small engine shop and have them grind it. Less than $10. 2nd most likely is worn bar. Turning the bar over may or may not cure that. Lay a straight bar across the rails and eyeball to see if it is square to the bar (both sides).
My bet is that you need both a new chain and a new bar.
BTW small chain (under 3/8") must be kept sharp for good performance. That is true for all chains but the smaller the more critical. The smaller the chain, the harder it is to file properly.
You might want to spend some time browsing in arborist.lawnsite.com in the chainsaw forum. Lots of very good info there, people are happy to help with problems.
Harry K
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Hi, Mike.
Chain must be oriented correctly relative to bar to cut. Rails on bar can be worn unevenly, as can chain side-straps, so that chain is misaligned to either side. Easy way to check bar is to place 6" or longer straight-edge on the rails, then see how square that is to the bar face.
I've trued up a few bars with a bench grinder, after which they cut "like new."
The chain straps you can give a quick visual, or caliper-measurement. If worn close to pivot pin, the chain is unsafe anyhow, and should be tossed.
Generally these problems are caused by hitting a rock or other nasty on one side of the chain, and continuing to run the saw. This presses the chain more firmly against the bar under the dull cutter(s), mainly wearing the bar. Yet another reason to check and sharpen the chain with each refueling. DAMHIKT
HTH, John
Michael wrote:

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Thanks, Harry. Good stuff.
Mike

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