Chain Saw Bar Wear

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vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email

Why? Because he suggests toucjing up the chain each tankful? Common and good advice!
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.. for no other reason than it makes cutting much easier. :)
Bruce
----------------------------------------------------------------------- It was so much easier to blame it on Them. It was bleakly depressing to think that They were Us. If it was Them, then nothing was anyones fault. If it was Us, what did that make Me ? After all, Im one of Us. I must be. Ive certainly never thought of myself as one of Them. No-one ever thinks of themselves as one of Them. Were always one of Us. Its Them that do the bad things.        <=> Terry Pratchett. Jingo.
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The bar is fine. Just make sure the oiler is working properly, keep chain oil topped up. Sharpen the chain regularly, if it's making square chips it's sharp, if it's making dust it's dull.
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Jonathan Goodish wrote:

Smoking? And you didn't stop? yep, that is dumb, but you know that.
The chain is unlikely damaged, you just sharpen it, and if it dulls very rapidly you may have ruined the temper, but I can't believe that would happen.
Lack of oil will screw up the bar. From your description, it doesn't sound like it got hurt. You can tell by running a finger very VERY carefully on top of the bar groove (bottom of bar where the pressure is during cutting) and along each side next to the groove. If you feel roughness or metal slivers, you need to draw file it.
Draw filing is fairly simple, put the blade in a vice with the edge you want to file up. Take a small fairly fine flat,file; hold it crosswise to the blade edge and exactly at right angles to the side (wide part), set it down on the edge with a bit of pressure and pull it toward you. Actually you can also push it even if it is called draw filing. The main point is keep the file flat so the blade is filed flat. You won't need to do much filing. Finish by lightly filing the edge with the file surface essentially parallel with the wide part of the blade to remove any fine metal slivers. DO NOT round the edge. If you are really a stickler, you could polish the edge by wrapping 400 grit wet/dry sand paper around the file and running it back and fort on the the blade in the same way you draw filed.
BTW, you should periodically flip the blade as you have done and it is a good thing to lightly draw file the used edge which will up after the blade is flipped.
So what have you learned? don't continue to try to cut with a dull blade, sharpen it.
Good luck.
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Actually, I did stop after it was apparent that the bar and chain were smoking. It wasn't apparent what was happening at first.
I have noticed that a chain that is wearing will go through softer woods without a problem but will not go through harder woods, such as oak. Given the fact that day 2 began with the oak, the distinction between the two wasn't as apparent as it would have been had I moved immediately from softer to harder woods. But, you're right, I now know how to instantly recognize when a chain isn't performing as it should.
JKG
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Keeping a cahinsaw sharp is IMO the most important part of maintenance. As soon as you notice it's not cutting so well, sharpen it. Before you start, sharpen it. You get the idea :)

Bruce
----------------------------------------------------------------------- It was so much easier to blame it on Them. It was bleakly depressing to think that They were Us. If it was Them, then nothing was anyones fault. If it was Us, what did that make Me ? After all, Im one of Us. I must be. Ive certainly never thought of myself as one of Them. No-one ever thinks of themselves as one of Them. Were always one of Us. Its Them that do the bad things.        <=> Terry Pratchett. Jingo.
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When you stop to fuel up, is a good time to hit the chain a least a couple of swipes on each cutter. Another good time is right after you hit a sap spout, a rock, a nail, etc... which is guan to be immediately after you finish sharpening it during your fuel stop.
--

-Mike-
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snipped-for-privacy@NOSPAMagresearch.NOTco.NOTnz (Bruce Sinclair) posted on that vast internet thingie:

Good advice! Which remindeded me of another tip. You saw should be throwing small wood chips and not fine sawdust. If your making sawdust instead of a pile of chips then you need to stop and sharpen.
Steve at SELLCOM
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net says...

If the chain and bar were smoking, then that suggests to me that you didn't have enough chain bar oil in the tank?!? Or maybe that the feeder hole was blocked, or that the groove in the bar was full of sawdust. Smoking should never occur blunt chain or sharp, if the chain lubrication works as it should.
Incidentally - there is more to it than hardwood and softwood. Some woods are very abrasive on chains, and you need to touch up much more often. (eucalyptos spp., for instance). A chain with rounded over cutters rather than the sharp cornered ones will live and perform much better in such woods (the sharp cornered ones perform better in soft timbers like pine and cedar).
I support what someone else already said: touch up the chain at every refuelling. Do a proper sharpening maybe every 5th or 6th tank ...
-P.
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On Tue, 18 Jan 2005 12:11:28 +1300, Peter Huebner

A dull chain will smoke like crazy if you keep trying to force it to cut - in fact the more oil on the bar the more it will smoke. I've conducted this experiment more than once in the past trying to use an old bar and chain to cut some bridge timbers - lots of heat, lots of smoke, not much cutting.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Chain just stretched, a new one will get a little longer after hard use, that's why there's an adjustment on the bar. I use a Dremel chain saw sharpener, doesn't take any time to touch up a saw, but I use a good guide and file for serious sharpening. RJ
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On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 22:47:07 -0500, Jonathan Goodish

I've smoked a bar or two over the years, so don't feel too bad about it. If there was still oil on the bar and it doesn't appear blue you probably didn't hurt the bar. Your problem seems (as you guessed) to come from a dull chain, so you are more likely to have damaged the chain. At worst, however, it will only mean that the chain won't stay sharp very long. Most of my chain saw work is done in softwood - dry pine or fir for firewood - and I probably sharpen the chain every hour or slightly more often, cutting cherry, ash and oak you aren't going to keep a chain sharp for an hour of steady cutting, let alone two or three. At this point my test would be to sharpen the chain and see if it cuts straight. If the saw wants to cut curves you may be able to sharpen it out, but I'd just toss the chain and try a new one. It is actually pretty amazing how messed up a bar and chain can be and still cut great as long as the chain is sharp.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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You say ----------------------------------- I started into some oak about 12" in diameter I worked through this for about an hour 7 or 8 cuts until the bar and chain were smoking so badly ------------------------------------ this is a very blunt chainsaw less than 10 seconds per cut for a sharp chain
snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net says...

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I didn't say that it took me an hour to make 7 or 8 cuts, I said that I had been cutting for about an hour, but it became progressively more difficult to cut.
In any case, you're right, with a sharp chain on this saw it is just a few seconds per cut.
In any case, I do have a filing kit w/guides, so I am going to give that a go and see what happens.
Thanks to all for your replies.
JKG
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wrote:

I haven't followed this thread all the way through, but I'll add that I use a Dremel with a chainsaw blade sharpening kit on it with excellent results and no more material removal than filing would cause. It's a lot quicker than filing.
Ken (MI)
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