Chain Link Fence Removal

I plan to remove a chain link fence from my back yard. I have read plenty of posts suggesting different ways of doing this, and sense I cannot get a vehicle into my back yard, I plan to dig out the posts. However, I am concerned about the holes that will be left behind. No one seems to mention the best method of refilling these holes. What is the best practice for refilling the post hole? Should I use dirt, sand, a combination of both, or something else? Thanks for your input.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Quote: Digilla wrote on Sat, 25 August 2007 15:35 ----------------------------------------------------

Best to just refill with what is already around there. Probably just dirt. Just make sure you tamp it down regularly as you fill to knock out any large void areas. Of course you can spread in gravel and sand but just for filler, and be aware that the gravel might show up again if you do any future digging in the area.
-- Richard Thoms President - Top Service Pros, Inc. Connecting Homeowners and Local Service Professionals http://www.TopServicePros.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You do not say what the posts are made of or what diameter. If metal (with no concrete base) it may be faster to remove them by pulling them out, leaving smaller holes to refill. The two methods: -- brute force, e.g. by a tractor or car on a paved roadway. The vehicle does not have to be near: you can use a long cable. -- levering the posts vertically upward. You can place your fulcrum so as to multiply the force applied.
Post holes of 2" diameter or less may need no special filling thereafter: or you can cut lengths of 2x2" scrap lumber that come up to within 2" of the soil surface.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dirt is what came out. Put dirt back.
s

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Combination. Tamp it tight as you fill it up with a 4 x 4 or a pole.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Digilla wrote:

Don't dig. Easier with a small length of chain and a bumper jack.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Bumper jacks are hard to find these days. An alternative is a so- called 'farm jack' from Northern Tools or Harbor Freight. Farm supply stores will also have post jacks that are in the $40 range. Tearing out the posts with a long chain and a pickup truck is a lot more fun though. If you generate a lot of tire smoke, keep the beer out of sight in case someone calls the authorities. Some people are just sooo humorless...
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Neighbor tried that one day and not sure if it was a chain or cable he used. when it pulled the post out of the ground , it threw it hard enough against the back glass it broke the glass. As the glass was already broken, he pulled out about 4 more he wanted out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have 3 farm jacks and helped a friend pull some chainlink posts with them. THEN we got to the gate posts. Would not budge. I asked him about them and he says OH, we reset those and used more concrete. After digging down 12" we find the top of a ball of concrete (at least 1 bag of redimix, maybe more, in each hole). We did not have the dirt to backfill that much concrete, and we were already down 6-12 inches, so a sawzall made quick work of the posts. We put the dirt back with very little extra dirt required. Avoided having to drag those big balls of concrete to the dump as well.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Topsoil should work well if you are planting something on top. I'd fill these holes as soon as possible to prevent injury or liability. You might advertise your fence for a low cost (or even free) but the buyer must remove it--that will save you some work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Digilla" wrpte"

Use an angle grinder to cut the posts off flush with the ground, and just leave the post bottoms/concrete in the ground where they are.
Offer the fence and posts as free in Craigslist, and someone will come by and pick them up for you.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you do this, I would suggest digging a little first, and cutting the posts *below* ground level. Then you don't have to worry about someone falling on them.
Though I think the post jack is the better idea.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Dirt. Tamp it down as you refill the hole.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I like the idea of using a car jack. That saves a lot of calories digging. Soak the ground around each post anchor, first, then use a broad base, like a 2x12 piece of scrap lumber, as a jack base. I wouldn't leave the cement anchors there, it just puts off the problem you face if you want another fence there. Roger

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Aug 25, 4:29 pm, "Roger Taylor" <sherryrogeratcomcastdotnet> wrote:

Second that. Much easier to remove the part in the ground when you have a 'handle' attached. Not fun to run into a chunk of concrete or pipe when you are doing some gardening or landscaping
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.