CFLs vs LEDs vs incandescents: round 1,538

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Yeah..... except healthcare
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wrote:

It would if the government would stay out of it. Most of the healthcare concerns trace back to tax policies that (1). tie insurance to the work place and (2). lead to you and me only paying (on average) out of pocket only about 20% of the costs. We really should TRY free market before we dis it.
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

Our health care system works well, 86% of our ~350M population has health insurance and of the remaining 14% a good number have it available, but choose not to take it.
Our health care system is far from broken and while you can readily come up with a few percent of the population with health care horror stories in the US, Canada, UK, etc. and make emotional news stories out of them, the fact is that the number is an extremely small percentage of the population.
What US health care needs is refinement, not reform. Tighter controls on insurance companies, more consumer protection, and a bit better method for handling the bottom few percent of the population than the current emergency room strategy. Doctors also need to rationalize the fact that theirs is no longer a gold mine career path and they may need to live with a smaller yacht and house.
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Fuck all it is !!!!
It is the biggest cluster fuck ever!!!
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

Those are the facts, whether you like them or not.
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Link?
Besides who the hell trusts stats from Repubs!
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

Not handy, I looked it up a few months ago.

It was from a government site, probably census.
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

Well, here's one statistic:
"In summary, CBO regards the estimates of between 5 million and 6 million children who are uninsured and eligible for Medicaid or SCHIP as more appropriate for considering policies aimed at enrolling more eligible children in those programs."
http://www.cbo.gov/doc.cfm?index 57&type=0
Our president himself says there are abou 13-15 million illegal aliens in the country.
The Department of Justice census says there are 2.6 million people incarcerated in various prisons and jails.
The following active duty military personnel do not have insurance:
Army - 543,000 Marines - 158,000 Navy - 335,000 Air Force - 330,000 Total: 1,366,000
We're up to about 25 million already without even considering those who decline to enroll in an available insurance program.
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Is that not 1,366,000 covered by the gubmint, no more inunsured than those on Medicare and Medicaid?
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Don Klipstein wrote:

I guess it depends on how you define "insurance."
In the military, if you get slightly injured (anything less than the bone sticking out), the medic or the corpsman fixes you up. This is not much different than the role of the company nurse.
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And if they get an illness requiring treatment, they get treated. These people have medics and corpsmen and do get transported to hospitals when it is necessary and possible to do so. They are not among the uncovered roughly 13% of USA's population that are citizens or legal residents.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Don Klipstein wrote:

They ARE among the 45 million who do not have health insurance.
Once again, absence of health insurance is not the same as absence of health care. The scare-mongering politicians have NEVER said we have 45 million people who do not have access to health care.
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Actually have gone pretty far out of their way to AVOID saying that. Things that make you go "HMMMM".
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Maybe I need to clarify: About 12-13% of USA's population is citizens and legal residents not covered by even so much as what soldiers have.
Roughly 38 million USA citizens and legal residents are "self pay", with hospital bills roughly quadruple of allowable hospital billing to Americans (and "coverers" thereof) who obtain "coverage".
Many of these Americans are ones taking their chances at betting on "which is the least evil" of evils that include at least one certainly-unaffordable and another only-possibly-bankrupting.
Please keep in kind others saying in this thread how their family costs $13K annually for private sector healthcare coverage, while professing to desire "keep gubmint out of it", while USA gubmint spends as high a percentage of GDP on gubmint spending on healthcare as Canada and most other industrialized democracies do.
Who wants to maintain American gubmint spending as high a percentage of GDP on healthcare as Canada has while in addition having private sector spending $13K for coverage of 1 family that inflates at roughly 10% annually, in the "name of" "Keep Gubmint out of this"? I do concede that some and many-influential Americans want such ...
Makes me want to find a way to move to Canada, though someone I would be married to (under law of all of Canada and a few USA "states") is unwilling to be uprooted from a metropolitan area where he has family ties.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Don Klipstein wrote:

I am currently paying approximately 1.5% of my gross income as my direct contribution to my health insurance costs, and have very good coverage.
If this claimed wonderful socialized health care materializes, can you honestly tell me that I will not see either a substantial increase in my costs to maintain the same quality of coverage, or experience a substantial loss of coverage?
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Pete C. wrote:

How much is your employer contributing? It's got to be a lot more than that.
I have decent health insurance, but I suspect that may be a big part of the reason I didn't get a raise this year.
I'm not saying that socialized health care is the answer, but costs are increasing at an alarming rate.
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:

I expect so, however that number is rather difficult to locate, I'd guess 60-70% of the total cost. It doesn't really matter much however since in the event of socialized health care, it is extremely unlikely that many people will see their gross pay increase be the amount of their employers former health insurance contributions, i.e. if my employer is currently paying $4k/yr towards my health insurance, I'm unlikely to receive that $4k in my pay when my employer provided health insurance is replaced by the government and my taxes go up to fund it.

That could be. Raises were delayed several months this year vs. previous years, but somehow I still managed to get a decent raise (4.73%).

Yes, they are, and many of the underlying causes for this will not be addressed at all with socialized health care. Indeed I expect the law of unintended consequences will go into full swing and there will be tremendous fallout when the forced contributions to various "community reinvestment" from insurance companies dry up along with their health insurance business. These forced contributions have long been a way to sidestep direct taxation of the populace to fund pet projects, so there are a lot of those pet projects that will suddenly be unfunded.
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You are either very wealthy or you have very cheap premiums. The cheapest I could find was 35% of my gross income with a $3k deductible. Completely out of my reach.
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h wrote:

The later. I expect my income puts me solidly in the nebulas "upper-middle-class" category, but I'm certainly not at all wealthy. No yachts, private jets, summer homes, etc. here.

Well, since I work for a very large company, I expect that they get some of the best group rates available, in addition to covering the largest percentage of the costs. Regulation of the insurance companies to set a maximum differential between individual rates and the best group rates would fix this issue without resorting to socialized health care. I expect my costs would go up some in this case, but probably still far less than with the government running things.
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<SNIP material otherwise getting more than 2 quote symbols>

How much are you paying? If it's the $12-13 K annually that is USA average cost for private health insurance coverage for a family, then it is 1.5% of an income level that very few Americans have.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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