CFLs vs LEDs vs incandescents: round 1,538

Page 2 of 6  

snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

Don...... you would be the man to answer my question which is:
Does there exist an LED refrigerator bulb replacement for my fridge?
I currently have a 60W "heater" in there which makes no sense!!
I've looked at Walmart and Lowe's..... but no such replacements
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

I've not come across any yet and would similarly replace with an LED if one blew but there is a clever little man (oops, person) inside most fridges and freezers that switches them off as you close the door. I suspect that the overall impact is minute compared to actually opening the door and keeping it unduly open!
Don't panic!
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I know.... you are right
I'm just an "optimizer" by nature and cant help myself!
But....... if there are 400 million people in the USA and say 100 million homes.... and if we save just ONE watt in the fridge bulb.... that is 100 million watts saved!!
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

I'm the same.

I thought it was below 300m, so a few less watts saved!
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Clot wrote:

~350M I believe.
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Pete C. wrote:

Made me curious. 304M (July 2008) according to this: http://www.census.gov/popest/states/tables/NST-EST2008-01.xls
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Pete C. wrote:

Interestingly, this came out today: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8224520.stm
I've always used the rule of thumb that the US population is five times the UK and don't see a reason to change it!
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Clot wrote:

The UK is less that 1/3 the size of TX, so think of what that means for population density and why just about nothing can be compared across the two countries.
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Pete C. wrote:

Quite. It's one of the reasons we tend to have smaller vehicles! We each have an eighth of the space over here.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_and_dependencies_by_population_density
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Clot wrote:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_and_dependencies_by_population_density That's why the bone heads in either "wing" trying to compare the US health care system with the UK health care system are just comparing apples and brussel sprouts, there just isn't much valid comparison.
Clearly delivering health care to a high density population is more efficient and less costly than delivering the same health care to a population spread over a much larger area. With low population density, more medical facilities, doctors, nurses and support staff are required to serve the same number of people.
The low population density in much of the US is also why mass transit isn't viable in much of the US. In the areas where the density is sufficient *gasp* we do have mass transit in the US.
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wrote:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_and_dependencies_by_population_density
really help a whole lot of us too much. :) Later, Charlie Carothers -- My email address is csquared3 at tx dot rr dot com
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CSquared wrote:

I was thinking the same way when reading Pete's view, but I think there are more communities of say ballpark 5, 000 to 10,000 people that are at a further distance to larger communities than here in the UK which would result in more local facilities being required in smaller communities than here in the UK.
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Clot wrote:

Yes, and there are plenty of areas in the US where you can drive for many miles passing through town after town with triple digit populations. Providing services to people in these areas is substantially more expensive than people in a large city. Transportation issues are a big issue for the poorer folks, you could give universal coverage to them (which already exists anyway in emergency rooms), but they still need to somehow get to the medical center that might be 50 miles away.
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Pete C. wrote:

Precisely so.
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wrote:

One of my friends from the rural area where I grew up about 70 miles NE of Dallas suggested recently that maybe I'd like to move back some day. I told her I really would love to in many ways, but that it would make the trip to all our various doctors an awfully long drive! As a result, I think we had best just stay put. It is only about 8 or 9 miles from our house to either of 2 very fine teaching hospitals here. I will grant you that there are likely some fine doctors less than 20 miles from my old home, but I'm not sure all the specialties we currently require at our "advanced age" are available there. Just as one example, my parents lived in that general area pretty much to the end of their lives but my Mom's oncologist was based in Dallas though ISTR he saw patients in Greenville at least one day a week. Later, Charlie Carothers -- My email address is csquared3 at tx dot rr dot com
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CSquared wrote:

TMC and the new medical center under construction in Denison would probably be adequate.
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wrote:

I'm sure it will be, and I'm happy for them. The population of Denison is about 24,000 though, and I was thinking more of places like Commerce with population less than 8,000. I'm sure there are better examples as you progress to even smaller towns. My comment in this thread started out as a weak attempt at humor, but I really do feel for all the people in rural or semi-rural areas who are not well served medically. Later, Charlie Carothers -- My email address is csquared3 at tx dot rr dot com
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CSquared wrote:

Yes, however they greatly benefit by not being stuck in some miserable big city :)
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wrote:

Big sigh. Couldn't agree more.
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Perhaps you might think so but that doesn't make it true. Most "essentials" are less expensive for the bumpkins than for your city folks.

That's why folks try to stay on good terms with their neighbors. Also, most rural communities have a "Rescue Squad" on call.
That said, if you have a heart attack while "in the sticks," the odds are you will not get to the hospital in time to make a difference.
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