CFLs lasting 1 year or less

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On Fri, 14 Jan 2011 11:21:33 -0800 (PST), ransley

WARRANTEE? or projected life. Two totally different animals.
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On Jan 14, 2:55 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

warranty
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On Fri, 14 Jan 2011 13:31:24 -0800 (PST), ransley

Never seen such an animal at Home Despot in Ontario Canada.
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On Jan 14, 8:59 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Look online, Ive ordered online before. Or maybe its a local with my HD getting a rebate to allow a low pricing.
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Look online, at HD, 4 -14w = 60w bulbs are 1.85. Get the green pack, that is Soft White or incandesant color equivilant. Popular Mechanics magazine rated them 1st in color, CR rated them about 4th in color. LPW tests were also 1st or second on CRs test. Mine last, I have maybe 40 in use.
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cubby wrote:

CFLs with "outer bulbs" around the tubing tend to start dimmer and take longer to warm up. Ones with bare tubing, such as bare spirals, tend to be less bad in this area.
Also, avoid ones of brands largely seen in dollar stores other than Dollar Tree. In my experience, these have an impressively high rate of being junk, often for more than one reason.
--
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)

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On 01/08/2011 08:32 PM, cubby wrote:

IMHO the Sylvania twisties are the best I've found for that, and they have a slightly higher color temp than GE etc. as well which I like but you may not.
nate
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replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
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Some of mine last as advertized and some dont. I find most of the failures are in the electronics. The electronics is very cheap so if they had spent the extra nickle they probably would have had a real 5/7 year bulb. I think two of the 6 in my bathroom fixture are getting colse to 5 years.
Jimmie
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woodchuck wrote:

I have CFLs almost entirely lasting 3-plus years at usage mostly several hundred to ~1500 hours per year. Many are making it for 5 years at this rate.
Brands I use: Mostly Philips and Sylvania, and whatever the main one Home Depot has when I get them (N:Vision of "Bright Effects").
Styles and wattages I use: Mainly 13 watt spiral. Also spirals of higher wattages in more-open fixtures other than downlights. Also 9 watt "ceiling fan" bulbs, but CFLs with outer bulbs tend to start dimmer and take more time to warm up. (I know why.) Also 13 watt "PL"/twintubes in an older floor lamp that I modified to use these.
Where I see CFLs dying young:
1) CFLs of "dollar store brands", after that in my actual experience Lights of America. (However, since I have avoided L.O.A. mostly for since 2002 and entirely for a few years due to personal experience of high rate of dying young and very high rate of producing less light than is produced by others with the same claims of light output, L.O.A. may have improved without me knowing they did so.)
2) CFLs over 13 watts, especially over 18 watts, used in small enclosed fixtures or recessed ceiling fixtures, especially if the CFLs were not made for such "heat hellholes"
3) When turned on and off frequently, especially in motion sensor lights
4) Ones not rated for use with dimmers being used with dimmers not rated for use with fluorescents or CFLs - or, non-dimmer-rated CFLs being used with electronic switching devices (timers, remote switching devices, etc.) not rated for CFLs or fluorescent lamps, "motor loads" or "electronic equipment". CFLs rated for use with dimmers in general tend to be OK with electronic lamp control devices even other than dimmers, with maybe exception for electronic control systems that sense separate switching associated with the lamp in question.
--
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)

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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/CFLs-lasting-1-year-or-less-613546-.htm jimn wrote: The ones I bought 10 years ago (and cost 10+ bucks a piece and made in North America) are still working. The ones I buy today, last maybe a year or two.. Guess where they are made. Thankfully they are cheap. Recycling them can be a pain (which you should do.. they contain mercury). I am not sure the money saving equation is working as much anymore. I do it because it uses less energy (at least here in the US.... not sure the making of these is using any less energy in China) .
Just like most stuff made to day, cheap, and not to last.. Cars have gotten much better though, go figure.
woodchuck wrote:

------------------------------------- Jim
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Without spending my time reading all the other replies here to see if this has been said ...
I researched this recently. CFLs are still a new technology and therefore not reliable. Cheap ones being made by minor companies don't last. And even good ones made by major companies won't last if you often have them on for less than 15 minutes.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

They're better than that now.
Ones that are on for only 15 minutes at a time will last significantly shorter than their rated life expectancy, but will still get in a few thousand hours of run time before they die.
When CFLs fail to get in a few thousand hours of run time, there are 3 usual reasons:
1) Use whey they overheat. Solution: Get ones rated for recessed ceiling fixtures, or be conservative with wattage.
2) Abuse worse than having them on 15 minutes or several minutes per start. Solution: If average on-time per start is less than a couple minutes, use incandescent, LED, or cold cathode CFL. CFLs that have a delay of a fraction of a second to a second before starting (and don't blink during that delay) have little starting-related wear and will last a long time in restrooms used for short trips.
(Cold cathode CFL is not as efficient as the usual hot cathode, but suffers no related to starting.)
3) Use of dollar store stool specimens of brands usually found in dollar stores other than Dollar Tree. My experience with these is a high rate of dying young, high rate of dying spectacularly, light output almost universally less than that of other CFLs with the same light output claims - sometimes by a factor of 3 - and usually either icy cold bluish white color or low color rendering index. Furthermore, in my experience most of these do not claim UL listing - which other CFLs with built-in ballasts generally have.
4) Use of ones of the Lights of America brand. My experience with those is a high rate of dying young, along with usually producing less light than is produced by other CFLs and by incandescents that have the same light output claims.
However, I have purchased only once purchased a L.O.A CFL since 2002 and none in the past few years. I do not know if my experience will repeat itself if I bought any now.
--
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)

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