cfl observation

Page 3 of 3  
Thats a great point. The FCC should test cfl bulbs and take them off the market if they fail to meet EMI limits. The NAB shold lobby the FCC to do this. Then the FCC and the EPA can duke it out to see who is going to protect us best. The old incandescent bulbs do have some advantages in some applications. Mark
.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why do you insist that big government is behind the light bulb phase out? It was the energy advocates and a few electric utilities who lobbied Congress, made their case and got the legislation passed. The light bulb industry was fully involved too. Once the legislation was in place, the government (specifically, the DOE and the FTC) enforced the law.
Tomsic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

CFLs generate more radio noise than LEDs because the fluorescent tube is a gas discharge or plasma and a radio noise source by itself. The electronic circuit can be another noise source. The LED bulb only generates noise from the driver circuit.
Moving the bulbs as far as possible away from the radio is the easiest thing to do. If your radio has an antenna screw or wire hanging out, connect a length of wire (wire size doesn't matter, telephone wire or doorbell wire is fine) to it an run it out a window like a clothes line. That will boost the am radio signal significantly. A proper installation would include lightning protection, an antenna wire oriented toward the radio stations and cut to optimum length.
Tomsic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Great solution. Ah, for the days when the signals from low frequency AM radio (550 - 1600 kilocycles, oops, kiloHertz,) stations could be captured with a piece of wire, aluminum foil, tin cans and coat hangers -- worked for VHF TV too, of course.
Tomsic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm actually still using a 6 or 8 foot piece of plain wire lying on the floor of my bedroom for a tv antenna. My digital DVDR with tuner and harddrive is connected to a big antenna with amplifier in the attic, It really annoys me when they try to sell digital tv antennas as if they are any different from "non-digital".
OTOH, the VCR with Set-Top box** is just connected to that wire in my second-floor bedroom, and it gets more stations than the DVDR, including a couple stations in DC (I live in Baltimore). When I try using that plain wire on the DVDR, it works even worse than the attic antenna, meaning the tuner in the set-top box is better than the one in the DVDR.
**One of the best for sale $80 minus 40 for the coupon they had when they went digital, but get this, it's brand is one of the cable companies. I don't know why they would even make set-top boxes. (It also has for the money, timed reception on any channel one chooses, so one can connect it to a VCR with timed recording. )
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


I'd love to find plans so I could make a 75 ohm, indoor, non-directional, high-gain TV antenna (VHF and UHF) -- maybe even with an amplifier. The ones that I've found on line are either 300 ohm or too directional for my location. The old rabbit ears atenna sitting high on a shelf in my living room does work, but the signal level drops in the summer when the leaves come out and trap the signal.
Tomsic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, January 8, 2014 12:30:01 PM UTC-5, = wrote:

You want something for nothing. Gain COMES from directionality. Sorry, there's no way around it. If you want nondirectional you'll have to add the gain with an amplifier. And you'll amplify the noise with the signal.
You can get some degree of frequency independence, like with a Discone or log periodic, but not direction independence.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have signal trouble, it seems, when it's raining and maybe some other things, but what I don't undestand is, why, for every signal that was pointed my way and got redirected by something, there isn't another signal that was pointed to a place nearby and got redirected towards me.
Do signals get absorbed by the rain?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
> >Tomsic > I have signal trouble, it seems, when it's raining and maybe s ome other things, but what I don't undestand is, why, for every signal that was pointed my way and got redirected by something, there isn't another si gnal that was pointed to a place nearby and got redirected towards me. Do s ignals get absorbed by the rain?
Digial Tv in the US is sensitive to multipath which showed up as ghosts on analog TV. Even if you have a strong signal, if there are too many relfect ions, the digital system won't work. Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/5/14, 3:44 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

This webpage has a rather lengthy explanation of a CFL's generation of RF energy. The relevant paragraph is quoted here:
http://www.interferencetechnology.com/rf-emissions-of-compact-fluorescent-lights/
"As an interference test, you can locate an AM receiver at Medium Frequency near the CFL and the reception will be interfered with an audible noise that you can hear.
The CFL generate an electromagnetic field in the 40-50kHz bandwidth, which can interfere with other electronic circuits; these emissions are in the near field due to the band of frequencies. If the room has some electronic devices that are sensitive to these magnetic fields, it is desirable to replace the CFL with another type of light, such as LED connected to a voltage regulator employing a linear regulator with no switching power. The incandescent lights can be used as well because they don’t have emissions."
No clue how to identify an LED bulb with a "linear regulator with no switching power" unless the package makes mention.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

you could always go to a store that has demo LEDs and bring your radio to test it
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Malcom "Mal" Reynolds wrote:

Hi, If radio signal is strong enough. noise won't bother much. I use Japan Radio NRD-535D all mode receiver out at my cabin. With it's good noise blanker and high sensitivity front end Noises from CFL, furnace, wireless thermostat is negligible. Also I home brewed high gain log periodic TV antenna I installed in upstairs attic. I can pick up 2 stations which fed thru AV receiver which handles ARC. But mostly I read books using my Kobo Glo.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, January 5, 2014 2:44:15 PM UTC-6, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

nd the heavens. The AM stations are pretty weak, but they'll do. We recentl y installed some CFL bulbs. We have to turn them off to listen to the AM ra dio. They cause a lot of interference. Before I drop max bucks on an LED, a nyone know if the generate this kind of noise?
The LED lamps should be much cleaner. Take a portable am radio with you to the store where you buy the LED lamps and see if they are "cleaner" than t he cfl lamps. Also, you can buy a filter to put in the line going to the c fl lamp to cut down the radio interference. You can also try to run the ra dio on a different circuit. If you have 240V ac power, run the cfl on one side of the 240V circuit and run the radio on the other side 120V circuit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't agree. Might have some kind of narrow voltage range where something may matter. I dim them all the time. I understand th principal, but dimming also tends to extend life of all bulb types. I dim the over stove light, and the kitchen pot lights, and my dinning set, all the time.
Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

There are no particular problems associated with the dimming of halogen bulbs. In fact, the ones that I've used in living room and bedroom track lighting over the past 10 years have been dimming just fine with only 1-2 failures in that time out of 17 fixtures which are on every evening.
Tomsic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.