cfl observation

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That's right. So-called decorative incandescent bulbs are not affected.
Tomsic
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No more importing or manufacturing. What is already here can be sold, and wholesalers and large stores probably stocked up, like they did the previous two years.
But today was as good a day as any. No reason to wait until they are almost gone.

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On 01/06/2014 04:06 AM, micky wrote:

Here is the pix
https://scontent-b-ord.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/s261x260/1012236_752904144736957_1803563489_n.jpg
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wrote:

Great example of early 1900s ceiling lighting fixture and bulbs. The light from those bulbs was rich and warm -- lots of red like an open fireplace.
Tomsic
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If your chandelier bulbs are the decorative type with a small candelabra or intermediate base, you've wasted your money. Those types are not regulated and not scheduled to be phased out. Only the standard 40, 60, 75 and 100 watt bulbs are disappearing and their halogen incandescent bulb replacements are on the shelves -- same light output, fewer watts and a higher price.
Tomsic
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On 01/06/2014 09:58 AM, = wrote: X

No, I am not wasting money...The bulbs have the standard Edison base and anything else would look foolish in the 1930's vintage chandeliers and ceiling fixtures.
As to the electric costs, the lights are basically for appearance and are only turned on occasionally...just to show them off when people come over.
https://www.google.com/search?q=squirrel+cage+light+bulb&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei9jKUpmhNemu2QX5toC4Ag&sqi=2&ved FIQsAQ&biw69&bih9
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The bulbs in the picture are made to mimic the designs of the original carbon and older tungsten filament lamps and have a wonderful appearance. The quality of light is the same as the original designs too.
Such bulbs are exempted from the federal regulations because they're considered decorative bulbs.
Tomsic
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On 01/06/2014 12:13 PM, = wrote:

Good. Though I ordered spares it's nice to know they will not go out of production due to the new regulations. I have a few of the real ones and even have one left that is still good...but do not use it.
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They are not regulated - but that doesn't mean they will always be readilly available. Having a full set or more of spares is NOT a bad idea.
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My grandmother had a pointed light bulb in her pantry, when she moved in with my aunt and her family about 1960. I took the bulb and for safe keeping put in my closet fixture, which had a broken chain and I never wanted to use it anyhow.
Then when my family moved in 1966, I forgot all about the bulb until before my last visit to Indy, about 5 years ago. I was there for 3 days and went by the old house every 3 hours but no one was ever home. Plus I can't find the name or phone number. Next time I'm there I'm going to ask if I can have my bulb back.
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On 01/06/2014 12:57 PM, micky wrote:

The reproduction lights I have a rounded on the ends. One can get a perhaps more authentic one with a "nipple" on the end, but they were more expensive and doubted anyone would notice...
but yes, you should try to get your old light bulb back it's an antique.
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Both my aunt and uncle are dead now and I've run out of reasons to go there. It may take 5 or 10 years. I'm dying to see what the current owners will say when a 70-year old guy shows up wanting his light-bulb back. There was always plenty of light in the closet from windows and the ceiling fixture. If everyone in the last 50 years has felt the same way, maybe they never repaired the socket and it's still there.
Their kid might appreciate it more than I. I get few guests and none who care about light bulbs. But I still want to see if they have it.
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On 1/7/2014 4:34 AM, micky wrote:

When I moved into the trailer I now have, there was a kids clothes dresser. I didn't pay it much attention, until the sister of the old residents called and asked if I had it. Sure. And, I gave it to her. No worries. Easier than haul it to Goodwill, she came and got it. I threw in the old photos that the last guy had left behind.
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On 01/07/2014 03:34 AM, micky wrote:

I don't think the bulb would still be there, but I do recall a flat I lived in...and former tenants would always show up to retrieve something they had left behind...usually in a storage area in the basement... even a painting left on the wall
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I'm glad Chris gave the old occupants their things. Seems right to me.

LOL. ABout a month after I moved out of my Brooklyn apt. I went back looking for a painting. The tenants before me were college age art students, and I hung up all 2 or 3 things they left behind, but this was definitely the best one of the bunch. The new tenants assured me they didn't have it. The mover had assured me he didn't have it. I found it 5 years later in a big suitcase, where I had put it to protect it. But when I unpacked, I was sure the suitcase was too small to hold the painting. If I did that now, I"d attribute it to my age, but I was only 36 then.
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On 01/07/2014 06:02 PM, micky wrote:

When I was at work, the only way I could find stuff I lost on my desk was to accuse a co-worker of stealing it.
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Yeah, I have several ceiling fans with light fixtures intended to have unfrosted incandescent bulbs. Pig tails look really dumb in the fixtures. I bought a case of a hundred to round out my already fairly good stock of them.

Mine are in the normal fixtures but our parents taught us to turn lights off that aren't in use. Our electrical usage from lights is more than trivial.

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On 1/5/2014 3:25 PM, philo wrote:

Cree LEDs are considered the highest-quality bulbs on the market. Made in the USA, too. For the home lighting market, they produce 40, 60, and 75-watt equivalent bulbs designed to resemble incandescents. Home Depot currently has the 60-watt equivalent Cree bulb on sale:
$7.97 Was $12.97 Save 39% Cree 60W Equivalent Soft White (2700K) A19 Dimmable LED Light Bulb
The 75w equivalent is their latest entry, and the most expensive. Apparently, the 75w equivalent threshold has been a challenge for LED bulb production in terms of cost/heat/lumen output. Cree claims they made a breakthrough, but since their bulb is first on the market, they're priced at about $25.00 each.
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The 75 and 100 watt equivalent screw-in LED bulbs have been a challenge to the LED manufacturers and it is the heat problem that frustrates the designers. Cree just announed a 75 watt equivalent; but GE announced a 100 watt equivalent earlier in the year and I think at least one other company did too. The GE LED bulb gets rid of heat with electronic "lungs". I haven't seen the Cree bulb so I'm wondering what kind of clever engineering they've done.
Tomsic
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On 1/5/2014 4:15 PM, Frank wrote:

I've got several LED flash lights which are excellent. You think the home bulbs might make some RF, with AC power being recticent to DC?
Curses on big government, like big pharma. Making all kinds of laws and substitutions with major side effects.
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Christopher A. Young
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