CFL bulb in range hood ?

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I did it. Never yet had a problem with overheating, even in an outside globe, in summer sun, left on 24/7 . I like protected housings. That outside light lasted for it's expected life.
Greg
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gregz wrote:

Hi, I Put in a shatter proof CFL. I got it from local HD store. It is wrapped in a clear some rubbery Silicon(?) stuff I suspect.
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I have been using a CFL in my range hood for about 4 years now without any problems. When I moved into this house, it had the circa-1969 basic Roper range hood: lamp, two-speed fan, grease filter. I think it may have originally had a plastic "shade" over the lamp, but by the time I got here, that was gone. I used that lightly for about a year - mostly for illumination, not because I was cooking.
As part of some kitchen improvements, I swapped out that range hood for the basic ~$80 NuTone range hood from Home Depot: lamp, two-speed fan, grease filter. This one has a plastic "shade" over the lamp, but it only completely encloses the lamp on the bottom side (towards the stove); it goes about 2/3 of the way up both sides of the lamp, but is open above that and on top. So, I'm not too worried about heat buildup.
In both hoods, I used a 60 W equivalent CFL (13 W), "Great Value" brand from Wal-Mart, which I think are made by TCP. I think the lamp that's in there now is the one I installed with the hood in 2010; if not then I've only replaced it once. The lamp ends up nearly horizontal; the screw base is very slightly higher than the lamp glass, because the socket isn't completely level. It hangs down maybe 5 or 10 degrees from horizontal.
The only thing I've noticed is that when it's cold inside the house, the CFL in the range hood flickers for a second or two at startup. That CFL didn't do that when new; it gradually started doing it over time. Other CFLs in the house from the same batch haven't started doing this.
I wouldn't recommend running without the "shade" - one of its jobs is to keep cooking grease off of the lamp. Wiping off a regular incandescent lamp is not too bad of a job, but completely cleaning a spiral CFL takes some work.
Matt Roberds
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On 12/14/2013 08:40 AM, Lee B wrote:

My situation is very similar. I put a CFL in there about 5 years ago and it's still working.
BTW, I started leaving the light on for a few minutes after cooking, as an indication the cooktop may be hot.
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On 12/15/2013 4:08 PM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

Just wanted to thank everyone for their input. This has been interesting. and it was also a trip down memory lane - my brother and I used to play with liquid mercury. My father, a physician, didn't have a problem with that, assuming that he knew. (Honestly, I'm not sure he was aware we did it, although I think there was initially mercury in the children's chemistry set we had). And the local shoe store had the foot x-ray thing. He told my mother not to let us play on that.
I think I'll look for the shatterproof CFL, but if I don't find one, I'll use a regular CFL. Ideally, I should get the overhead fluorescent tube light fixture replaced, but the CFL bulb sounds simpler, ha.
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"Lee B" wrote in message
I have an older range hood with a light in it. I tend to use it more for light than I do my finicky fluorescent ceiling light. I've been using incandescents, but since I often leave the hood light on over night, they have a limited lifespan. So I'm wondering if it's OK to use a CFL over the stove? Is the horizontal position a problem? (Asking because I know I've seen discussion about upside down fixtures).
I do very little stove top cooking (I'm a microwave kinda person), so I'm not as concerned about the heat, but I'm wondering about that too. Someone at Home Depot said it would be bad for the electronics inside, but I figured I trust the collective minds here more, LOL. If it makes a difference, it has one of those little plastic snap on covers that squeezes into place.
After reading most all of the replies and the subject sort of changed to deadly other things I wonder why I am still here. WWll Navy and SeaBee. Worked with asbestos. Also on heating ductwork covering. Electronic work asbestos wiring covering. Cut an installed asbestos home siding. Laid asbestos floor tile. And then other things, Worked for Westinghouse transformer rebuilding in the late 40's. Transformer oil had PCB in it. Would have my hands in it. Played with mercury as a kid. Mercury in my teeth fillings. Hope I am still here next week to still be alive and kicking. WW
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