CFL bulb in range hood ?

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I have an older range hood with a light in it. I tend to use it more for light than I do my finicky fluorescent ceiling light. I've been using incandescents, but since I often leave the hood light on over night, they have a limited lifespan. So I'm wondering if it's OK to use a CFL over the stove? Is the horizontal position a problem? (Asking because I know I've seen discussion about upside down fixtures).
I do very little stove top cooking (I'm a microwave kinda person), so I'm not as concerned about the heat, but I'm wondering about that too. Someone at Home Depot said it would be bad for the electronics inside, but I figured I trust the collective minds here more, LOL. If it makes a difference, it has one of those little plastic snap on covers that squeezes into place.
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On 12/14/2013 08:40 AM, Lee B wrote:

I would never use any type of fluorescent light right next to an area where food is being prepared simply due to the fact that they contain mercury. The chance of one breaking is probably not that great...but personally , I'd just never do it.
The guy at HD was very possibly right too, they'd probably be negatively affected by heat.
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On 12/14/2013 8:49 AM, philo wrote:

??? You mean to say that if an incandescent bulb broke you'd sweep up the pieces (or pick them out of the soup as the case may be) and go on to dinner?
If the bulb breaks, it breaks and everything in the area goes in the trash and it's a do over. Period.
I really think that in this context the only issues to concern yourself with are bulb longevity due to positioning and, possibly, heat - but the latter apparently is NOT a concern of the OP
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On 12/14/2013 09:15 AM, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

No. a fluorescent would spew mercury contamination everywhere.
An incandescent...just broken glass.
Yes, you'd have to throw out any food in the area but with the fluorescent there would still be traces of mercury left behind.
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guess I'm going to die then because my brother and I had a bottle of mercury that we would pour out on the table and play with when we were kids. Rolling from here to there and making little blobs out of big ones and then back to big ones. Someone please come save me!!!!!!
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On 12/14/2013 01:03 PM, ChairMan wrote:

yep, me and my friends all played with mercury when we were kids
and probably within the next 40 years we'll all be dead.
Also: we put our feet in those 'shoe' xray machines
Kids today are so much deprived of real fun
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And we used a mixture of asbestos and plaster of paris as modelling clay.
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On 12/14/2013 1:26 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I recall reading about a young woman scientist working The EPA who told her superiors that there was only one form of asbestos that was a health hazard. Her superiors told her to shut up because the people who were forced by the government to spend billions to remove or replace asbestos in their products would show up at the door with pitchforks and torches.
http://users.rcn.com/leadsafe/asbestos.html
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-1253022/The-Great-Asbestos-Hysteria-How-man-claims-BBC-profiteering-firms-politicians-grossly-exaggerated-dangers.html
http://preview.tinyurl.com/k6tus6t
TDD
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On 12/14/2013 4:44 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

That doesn't make a lot of sense.
"Six minerals types are defined by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as "asbestos" including those belonging to the serpentine class and those belonging to the amphibole class. All six asbestos mineral types are known to be human carcinogens."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asbestos
I have heard that because it's a naturally occurring mineral there is no way to escape exposure in certain areas unless you wear a respirator 24/7.
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On 12/14/2013 9:26 PM, gonjah wrote:

The story could have been or was apocryphal but it had information about different forms of asbestos where one was rod shaped and another was shaped like a pigtail or curlicue. The story went on the say that only one of the types was dangerous. It's been a long time since I read the story but I suppose I could search the web for it or something like it. ^_^
TDD
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On 12/15/2013 2:09 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

I read part of the article in your first link and it is interesting. I don't see how it makes disturbing asbestos "safe" which I believe is the main concern with it. As far as imbedded asbestos, in say a piece of siding or insulation, it's probably just as dangerous as naturally occurring asbestos. Maybe more so.
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On 12/15/2013 9:24 AM, gonjah wrote:

Everything in our environment is dangerous in some way or other, I simply use common sense. If I ever do anything that would produce a cloud of dust, I wear a respirator of some kind. Back in the late 1970's there was a large forest fire in the next county and the smoke was blowing our way. My nose actually started bleeding but I'm quite allergic to things like that especially tobacco smoke. I think the danger of asbestos in things like shingles or brake shoes is from any dust produced by such products when they're broken up, sawed or ground into dust in some way. If you're familiar beryllium and how dangerous it can be, you will notice that no one pays much attention to it because of all the howling about asbestos. Ignorance of beryllium is rife in our society even though it's all around us in electrical and electronic equipment. If you work with electronics you must be careful with any parts made of beryllium because you don't want cut, file or saw the metal because could produce dust or particles that may get into your lungs. Anyway, if people knew of all the things in our environment that are toxic enough to make you ill or kill you, they may stay in bed and pull the covers over their heads, which could be dangerous in some way too. ^_^
http://ewasteguide.info/node/219
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg311.pdf
http://www.chemicalindustryarchives.org/dirtysecrets/beryllium/2.asp
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beryllium_poisoning
TDD
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If you aren't mining the stuff or tearing down a giant room that was insulated with it, it's really not worth worrying about. Even the EPA doesn't care how you handle it when you are dealing with less than something like 20 square feet of "demolition".
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On Sunday, December 15, 2013 3:09:18 AM UTC-5, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Voer 3 dedades ago I went to a lecture at college given by David Baltimore, who won the nobel prize for his work on cancer research. At the time, he told us that he was not optimistic that a cure for cancer would be found within our lifetimes. One interesting fact I still remember was him describing how you could take pieces of glass and insert them in lab rats and at the same time, insert ground up glass in other rats. One group of rats developed cancer, the other did not.
So, I would not be surprised at all that some forms of asbestos are more dangerous than others. Anyone that thinks there is great danger because there is siding on a house which contains asbestos, is IMO, nuts. The health dangers from asbestos were first found in ship workers and other who were breathing it in during WWII in environments where it was so dense in the air you couldn't see. From that, it's gone to an ambulance chasing bunch of lawyers, who try to claim that if you're sick, it must be from just looking at asbestos for two months when you had some particular job.
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On 12/15/2013 9:33 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Sure, leave it alone and there is no problem. True with a lot of things. Wild animals, rip tides, cliffs, etc....
The problem is when you have it in your house, school, workplace etc.....
"When materials in your home become damaged or disturbed, microscopic asbestos fibers can become airborne. When this happens, health-risks become a factor as inhalation of these fibers can cause them to be trapped in the lungs, to accumulate, and cause scarring and inflammation." etc....
http://voices.yahoo.com/lead-paint-asbestos-everything-know-3407898.html?cat=5
We could outlaw cfls for the same reason 25 years from now. Maybe not because the exposure is so minimal.
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On Sunday, December 15, 2013 11:14:55 AM UTC-5, gonjah wrote:

No, it's genearlly not a problem when you have it in your house unless you're dumb enough to do something stupid with it. If it's in you siding, how exactly is that going to kill you? If you take a grinder to it and breathe it in extensively, well then maybe you have a problem. If it's in your floor tile and you're dumb enough to take a grinder or sander to that, then you increase you're risk. Even the guys who worked in environments with it so thick in the air you couldn't see, only have a few percent risk of getting cancer from it.

This is gross extrapolation from workers that were exposed constantly to huge amounts of it based mostly on scare tactics.

The exposure to asbestos in a home in most cases is minimal too, unless you do something stupid, like grind up floor tile or siding that has some in it and breath in as much as you can. Kind of like sticking your wang in a 240V outlet. Maybe we should get rid of those too.
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On 12/16/2013 12:35 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I dropped a CFL at my parents house, a couple weeks ago. Mom got the vacuum cleaner. I was going to suggest wisk and dust pan, but she was insistent. I commented to Dad, with all that air flow through the vac bag, any mercury would be in the atmosphere. I also remembered commenting we'd all be mad hatters, and we were all about to die. Maybe that's it? Dad died a day or two after Mom vacuumed up a broken CFL.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

As a kid, I used to throw broken asbestos siding into a trash fire barrel, and after a minute or two they would blow apart with a bang. In the Navy in the late 1950s, I used to work on ducts that were insulated with asbestos without any protective clothing, pulling off the asbestos to make additions to the ducts. I also wore an asbestos fire suit and hood during helicopter landing operations. It was itchy during and after wearing it. I was supposed to run into the fire to rescue occupants of the helo in case of a crash. Oh, and like I said before, I'm 76 years old.
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On 12/15/2013 8:50 AM, willshak wrote:

You're too ornery to die. I was sent home from the hospital to die and put in home hospice care then dropped after 6 months because I wasn't dying fast enough. I wasn't declining and my visiting nurse would get mad at me for going out and pushing myself to work as hard as I could. Folks die when they give up and don't fight it. You could be one of the growing number of Americans reaching 100 years of age. Of course, with this Obamacare nonsense it won't be allowed. o_O
TDD
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On 12/15/2013 11:19 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

It's idiotic statements like that that have undermined the tea party movement.
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