CFL Brightness Time

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On 1/12/2012 6:35 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Well, they were blind. What would you expect? :)
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I have them in all our bath fixtures - the round globe kind - in the 3, 4, and 6 sockets - alternate CFL with incand -
can't tell the difference after the warmup of about 60secs.
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On 1/14/2012 12:17 PM, ps56k wrote:

Whooosh.... :)
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On Tue, 10 Jan 2012 13:08:30 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Interesting forum. I took the time to document my useage of all. I learned that I have many more than I thought. RV Building=        10-100W CFL (Cool White) Outer Garage=         6-100W CFL (Cool White) Site Pole Lights=     6-100W CFL Bug Light Porch/Exterior Doors=     5- 60W CFL Bug Light Security on Motion Det= 5-150W Inc Flood General Site=         2-250W HPS Attached Garage=     4- 60W CFL in GDO's (Cool White) Attached Garage=     8- 2 lamp 40W Fluorescent (CoolWhite) Laundry Room=         2- 2 lamp 40W Fluorescent (Warm White) Breakfast Room=     4- 60W CFL & 1-100W CFL in fan (Warm White) Kitchen=        10- 100W CFL in Recessed Cans (Warm White) Dining Room=         5- 100W CFL Dimmable (Warm White) Living Room-         4- 100W CFL in Lamps (Warm White) Family Room=         10- 60W CFL in 2 Fans (Warm White) MBR=             4- 60W CFL in Fan (Warm White) MBath=             10- 60W CFL in Vanity Fixture (Warm White) MBath=             3- 60W CFL in Enclosed (Warm White) Library=         20- 100W CFL Trac Lights (Warm White) Halls, Stairs, Baths, BR's, Desk Lamps, Lamps     14-100W CFL,14-60W CFL, 2- 40W CFL (Warm White) Utility Rms          8-100W CFL (Cool White)
In Stock         CFL=8-100W, 8-60W (Warm White)              Incandescent 120-100W, 40-60W, 12-25W
Failures since 2004     3-60W CFL, 1-100w CFL
No issues with any as to warm-up, initial brightness, etc. About 90% GE and remainder are mfr test samples.
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This reminded me of my first vacation trip on a cruise ship in 1986. Small carnival ship. With my ham radio and ship FCC license experience I make my way up to the radio room. I look in. Man at desk flipping out morse code, another watching. Fairly small room, no fancy equipment. I look up at the flashing lightbulb. It is attached to the outgoing transmission line. I felt safe we had a good communication link!!!
Greg
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I find different issues all the time. I installed bathroom ceiling light fixtures only finding out they used bayonet twist lamps costing more, of course. I changed the sockets, bought new lamps. The first time I turned them on, they were very dim, then brightened up. After the first start up, they came on with much more brightness. Must be something with the gas or something.
Greg
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I started using one on a dimmer 15 years ago. Worked well, and it was a dim able cfl bought at home depot. Sure I paid good money for it.

What about summer.

I also use them in series circuit for testing electronic equipment. Whoops I better buy some.

I got two on constantly downstairs. Figure on turning my outside lights on ahead of time. At least it does not startle the deer.

I need to turn on my electric heater downstairs by my computer. I'm laying on the couch with my pad. Greg

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wrote:

GE-Made in China- Best response time by slim margin. Sylvania-Made in China-Most consistant color. Bright Star-Made in China-Very cheap. I use in basement and all 3 garages. Watt Saver-Made in China-Only have two. Were promotion.
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If you mean buy one that is a flood light, that's gonna be hard to put into my front door light. And the problem of outdoor performance is in cold temperatures, which I believe is an inherent problem with the technology which has to excite mercury vapor. It would seem to me that doing that is always going to be more difficult in cold temps. The CFLs I've seen for outdoor use did nothing to improve the time to full brightness, which is what's being discussed.
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wrote:

I wonder if there is anything in the electronics that affects warm-up time, or if it is strictly in the bulb chemistry that affects the warm- up?
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wrote:

I use GE spiral. Rating=1,400 lumens. Start-up=1,250-1,300 lumens average (10 spiral CFLs). After 10 minutes=1,440-1,510 lumens. Possibly due to mfg. tolerances?
Also have found that Sylvania CFL bug lights work great. RatingW. 3000K. I use them in post lights. Slowest up to brightness was when temp was -18F. Probably 5 minutes or so.
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Makes sense. I suspect people with those "bath bar" type light fixtures with the big round globes are more predisposed against CFLs than those who have only used spirals. Something to keep in mind when shopping for bathroom light fixtures.
nate
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wrote:

Do you mean CFL's in a globe or globe-shaped CFL's'? I've got a "bath bar" over the bathroom vanity. No globes, 4 bare bulbs. I've got the Feit 75 watt (13 actual) spiral CFL's in there. Mentioned before I got a couple 18 bulb cases at Menards for 5 bucks a case. Since it was my son that bought them and the price is from memory, let's say 10 bucks for now. Either 28 or 56 cents a bulb. The same bulbs are in that fixture from at least a year ago. They produce full light when I flip the switch as far as I can tell. They get flipped on and off many times a day. The incandescents we used in there were always burning out. Besides that, the CFL's don't leave spots in my eyes after I glance at them. I'm pretty much sold on CFL's as long as they aren't too expensive. Doesn't mean others are. I don't have any recessed fixtures or outside instant brightness needs.
--Vic
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I meant the CFLs that look like globes (but really have a spiral inside.) That is undoubtedly what your fixture was intended to use (or else decorative round incandescents) and those CFLs are atrocious in terms of initial light output and warm up time compared to the regular spiral CFLs. However, they're more likely to be approved by the design department.
At my current place there's a similar fixture but it has spirals in it. No problems. It's not design-department approved, but I don't really notice it unless I look at it.
n
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What I have found with major consistency in terms of trends:
CFLs with outer bulbs tend to start worse-dim and need more time to warm up. The upside of those is that they are designed to work well over a wider temperature range.
CFLs with bare tubing (especially wider-width tubing around 12-15-16 mm wide) tend to be less-bad at starting dim. Bare-tubing CFLs tend to reach their "ultimate temperature" much more quickly than CFL tubing within outer bulbs.
If you have a strong dislike of CFLs due to warmup requirements, need to tolerate short on-time, or "the like", Philips has some somewhat-attractive LED products available at Home Depot. The brighter ones of those even have high color rendering index and rating for safe use with the usual-type of dimmers.
There is the matter that the "incandescent ban" has one of its many exceptions being for meeting/exceeding an energy-efficiency standard, that all 3 of the "Big 3" meet. So far at least, Philips at Home Depot, Sylvania at Lowes, and GE at Target.
--
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@donklipstein.com)

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