Ceramic tile on kitchen floor?

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Grout is either plain Portland cement or Portlant cement + sand. (Yes, I know there are epoxy grouts, never tried it, don't want to). Both are porous, sealer mitigates that. However, sealer may not last forever; is that a big deal? Certainly not if the tile is going on a slab, probably not if on a wood subfloor. It can always be resealed.
Nothing is easier to clean up than a tile floor unless it is a tile floor with light colored grout. IMO, IME, YMMV. __________________

The dish could break, the tile could chip. ___________________

The thing that kills feet is surface that is both hard AND flat. If a floor is hard but less than flat it is much easier on feet. For example, I tiled our hole house with Saltillo tile which is very irregular on the surface. That irregularity means the pressure points on your feet are constantly changing as you walk or even move slightly. Now, that irregularity is not matched by any other tile I know of but some have a lesser irregularity. ____________________
Comments Some have suggested using large tiles to minimize grout area. One could use relatively wide joints too. Small tiles are easier to lay because they can follow an irregular laying surface; bigger tiles - 16"+ - need a better surface, more attention to spreading thinset evenly.
Some strongly favor porcelain tiles vs ceramic. There are two primary differences...porcelain is color through (chips less apparent) and denser, said density resulting in less water absorption which is why they are recommended for wet areas (I don't consider a kitchen to be a "wet area). They are not necessarily more slip resistant than glazed tiles as any tile can be made slip resistant, all will have a coefficient of friction available both when wet and when dry.
The down side of porcelain is that it is harder to cut (also pricier).. Use a diamond wet saw? That will certainly cut it but every cut edge will have chips (same for ceramic). I much prefer score and snap as it leaves a clean edge and is faster; true, the edge will be sharp and will need to be honed a bit but less so than needed to hone out chips.
More on ceramic vs porcelain... http://homerenovations.about.com/od/tiling/tp/4-Ways-To-Pay-Less-For-Tile-Online.htm
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On 10/17/2016 4:23 PM, dadiOH wrote:

Why be afraid of epoxy? I used it in both bathrooms, walls and floor. Easy to clean, no sealing. I'm going to use it in the kitchen too.
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chips.. Just put a strip of good masking tape on the tile before cutting..
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Maybe I used the wrong word. What I am talking about are actually "tooth" marks from the diamonds sparsely attached on both sides of the blade's rim. Masking tape can help on the bottom side of whatever being cut on a table saw because it reinforces the area where the blade exits but I can't see it doing anything for tile when the chips are at the blade's entrance.
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The proper way to cut porcelain tile is to use a wet saw with an adjustable, fresh, diamond blade. First you make a shallow cut, about 1/8" into the face, then you adjust the blade for a deeper cut and cut the through the tile.
If you rush it or use an inferior blade or saw, you will chip the tile.
This article describes the process nicely.
http://homeguides.sfgate.com/cut-porcelain-floor-tile-chipping-42250.html
IMHO, the lifetime benefits of porcelain far outweigh the minimal extra effort required to install the tile.
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On Tue, 18 Oct 2016 14:41:25 +0000, Stormin' Norman

All "diamond" blades are not created equally. Cheap blades do not have a lot of diamond on them in the first place.

Agreed. We have a lot of tile here and porcelain is better.
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my comments on tile in the kitchen
most anything you drop will break feels cold on bare or stocking feet in the winter its a lot of weight on the joists and they may sag
m
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

This I can agree with .

Maybe .

This is total bullshit . If you have sagging joists there are other problems besides the weight of the tile .
--
Snag



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On Tue, 18 Oct 2016 14:41:25 +0000, Stormin' Norman

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On Tue, 18 Oct 2016 17:24:10 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

It's a shame the OP vanished from the thread after the initial post. Maybe he was just pulling everyone's leg.......
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wrote:

No, just away from home for a while, without the computer.
Thanks to all who responded. I'm going to do my best to talk her into a tile floor. I know about non-slip tiles; personally, I wouldn't use any tile on a kitchen floor that I wouldn't use on a bathroom floor -- it's just as easy to spill water on a kitchen floor as on a bathroom floor. I'm not sure why she's concerned about fatigue, when I do 80% or more of the cooking. As for damage to -- or caused by -- dropped dishes, well, don't drop them, right?
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it. Water resistant or water proof making tape is best. Duct tape might work too.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: ...

if you lay the floor out right your cuts should be along edges where the base goes. usually won't even see or notice them.
songbird
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On 10/17/2016 10:47 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

I had ceramic in my last house and eventually will here too. Choose wisely. Gloss finishes can be slippery when wet but there are other finishes that are safe. My bathrooms are a matte finish and never had a problem.
Do not go with a wide grout line as it is easier to clean a narrow one. There are urethane grouts now but I have no experience with them. I used epoxy grout and love it. No sealing, stays cleaner, very durable.
You may find it good to use a mat or rug in front of the sink. Actually a good idea with any flooring.
As for cleaning, only thing we ever used is water and a sponge mop. Made cleanup easy.
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On Monday, October 17, 2016 at 9:47:46 AM UTC-5, Doug Miller wrote:

Our kitchen has a black and white checkerboard ceramic tile with black grou t. The black grout shows no stains whatsoever. There are a couple of small chips where things were dropped and my wife made them less visible with mar ker.
Be sure to not use glossy tile as it will be slippery. I've seen wall tile used on the floor and the smallest amount of liquid makes it like ice. Also , make sure your subfloor is solid or you'll find the grout or tiles cracki ng from the flexing.
If you use a sealer, use the penetrating type. It will have to be resealed periodically. I have a customer who used epoxy grout. Epoxy grout does not stain and is waterproof. However, it is difficult to work with and almost i mpossible to clean up from the tile surfaces after it hardens.
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In alt.home.repair, on Mon, 17 Oct 2016 14:47:23 -0000 (UTC), Doug

Don't you have to seal the grout periodically? What a pain!

That's what stops me. China will break and cast iron or maybe even lighter stuff will break the tile.

Because she's the secondary cook? And will be, primary if you ever retire, get sick, or are overthrown?
This house came with vinyl linoleum (not really linoleum), one piece as wide as the room. Water doesn't penetrate it. I dropped quite a few things on it, including glasses iirc and only 1 thing ever broke, iirc. If the stuff were more expensive it might be even bouncier.
It looked great until I bought 2 kitchen chairs with wheels. They rolled out the top layer, with the pattern, like a rolling pin rolls out a pie crust. Did more damage in 6 months than the previous 6 years (which had done none).
So I looked for vinyl linoleum with the color and pattern going all the way through. Like Congoleum, but the don't make that anymore. (In 1960 they mailed us a sample in the form of a circle. Must have been a good plan because 40 years later, Iwanted to buy some.) It's too stiff to roll up so iirc, storage, transporting, and installing are all more difficult. But there are sheet products better than what I had. I forget if any will withstand chairs with wheels (moving while someone is sitting in them) and I don't know if you have any.
That leaves 9 and 12" vinyl or something or other tiles. They sound like a good idea.
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