Ceramic nonstick pans

Page 1 of 2  
What is the best value in ceramic nonstick frying pans? My brother bought some white ones on eBay and the nonstick performance is not very good at all. Food does stick and it is impossible to wipe them clean with a paper towel.
I want something with good nonstick performance at a reasonable price. Can anyone recommend one? Thank you in advance for any help.
--
When I am in the kitchen, I often kick one of my cat's balls.
After I kick it, he will sometimes play with it for a few
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 16 Mar 2013 19:08:09 -0700, Daniel Prince

Very few pans have truly long lasting non-stick, but you should be able to get some years from them. I have two size non-stick pans. The large one is a Woll that is on the pricey side but still is non-stick after five years. Then I have a small Farberware pan that is about 2 years old now and was about $15 at TJ Maxx. I can fry an egg and just wipe it out with a paper towel.
I've see the "ceramic" pans but have not tried any of them. For serious cooking I use SS lined copper (mine is Falk) or a tri-ply All Clad.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

ceramic pans on those tv infomercials, and you can't believe more than 10% of what they claim / promise.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

By "SS" do you mean Stainless Steel or Silverstone?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silverstone_%28plastic%29
--
When a cat sits in a human's lap both the human and the cat are usually
happy. The human is happy because he thinks the cat is sitting on him/her
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 03 Apr 2013 00:28:34 -0700, Daniel Prince

Stainless
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I got stainless, copper core. I hardly use it. Thinking about getting a carbon steel pan, besides the wok I have.
Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 04/03/2013 02:48 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Last time they were on sale at Costco I bought a set of Tramontina frying pans -- and I'm really happy. I've been using plastic/wood tools with them (no scratches -- why take a chance?), and stuff really doesn't stick -- including scrambled egg whites (dried egg white + equal volume of water, blend (in blender) until mixed) with no oil or Pam. They're on sale again. $20/set, no coupon required.
--
Cheers, Bev
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Daniel Prince wrote:

A properly-seasoned and properly maintined cast iron skillet/pot is non-stick and will last for hundreds of years.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/17/2013 9:14 AM, HeyBub wrote:

I agree. Non-stick pans may be fine for a couple of years but coating wears and when sticking starts you cannot clean without abrading the finish.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Plus you can't use metal spatulas with Teflon. Cast iron is best, to me.
--
Tegger

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Everything has a "best use" place. CI is great for some stuff, not so good for others.
Want to sear a teak? Get out the CI
Want to cook something with tomato sauce or other acidic ingredients? Use stainless steel or other non reactive material.
If I want to make breaded pork chops, the ones in the triple ply stainless steel will brown evenly over the entire pane, while the ones in the cast iron will brown faster towards the center of the pan, than the outer edge. The copper pan is great for even browning also.
We often use the cast iron pan as a roasting pan for pork roast and meatloaf. It works great for that. Put the formed meatloaf in the pan, cut up potatoes and put them around it, cook in the oven at 400 until done, about 160 degrees. Turn the potatoes once.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sear a teak???? I don't normally cook my wood before varnishing or otherwise finishing it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have to drag out the cast iron skillet I use at camp. I have not tried that much lately. Ill have to get to know it. My one aluminum, tfe, pan still has a tendency to lift up in the center with gas heat, even hough its thick. I made a bad choice buying a really thin pan, you can bend with our hand. My stainless skillet is a bit of a pain, even though it's really nice with copper bottom.
I use enameled roasters or enameled soup pots, because they impart less flavor, even compared to stainless. They go bad too after a lot of use.
Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


I have 3 styles 1) Cast Iron, for big jobs, simmering, and griddle use 2) Aluminum, uncoated for middle work 3) Thin carbon steel pans for fast frying, eggs, crepes, roux, etc.
The trick with all 3 is proper seasoning and no scrubbing with hard detergents and scrubbers I only use boiling water and an bristle brush to clean them. That always leaves a small coating of fat (butter, oil, lard) that keeps the iron one from rusting and forms the next coat of seasoning when heated before use.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My wife ditched all of the Teflon and aluminum crap for laminated stainless/copper pans. Stainless is just as good as cast and a whole lot easier to clean, unless you're one who doesn't. (ick)

Aluminum and stainless work for that, too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

I use mainly my cast iron skillets and Calphalon hard anodized aluminum pans.
The old-school Calphalon, without any "non-stick coating," work well with a minimum of oil, and withstand metal utensils. They are also suitable for heating/browning in the oven. However, unlike the iron skillets, they must be kept free of "patina" to retain their inherent non-stick quality.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HeyBub wrote:

Plus, a cast-iron pan adds a little iron to your diet...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Daniel Prince wrote:

These reviews sounds like they don't really work as advertised very long.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Ceramic vs traditional teflon-type at Cook's http://www.cooksillustrated.com/equipment/overview.asp?docid 400 Eco-friendly nonstick skillets promise to help the planet while they cook your dinner. But do any actually measure up?
Naturally you can't see the comparison chart without getting involved, but the front article is useful.
--
Mike Easter

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
teflon is being taken off the market for fear of health troubles it causing......
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The concern is for a substance that is used in the /manufacture/ of Teflon; that chemical is absent from the finished pan.
Teflon on cookware is harmless to human health. Not that the "chemical" paranoiacs will believe that.
--
Tegger

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.