Central Vacuum Cleaner Hose Blocked

The 20' hose for my central vacuum cleaner sucked up a small plastic garbage bag. We have tried putting several broomsticks in the hose to push out the obstruction, but it has not worked. Short of buying a plumber's snake, any other suggestions?
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If it's a "plastic" hose:
Try flushing it out with a garden hose, using a wet rag or something to contain leakage and pressure loss where the two hoses overlap.
HTH,
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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Jeff Wisnia wrote:

I like that one and the one of reversing air flow direction to blow it back out.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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possibly you can connect the hose to the vac's exhaust and blow it out

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You're sure it's _in_ the hose? Assuming you've not been able to suck it back out the way it came in, I'd try the following: Buy a length of BX cable, > 20", possibly with thought in mind of using it for upcoming project. Tape over one end, so no sharp edges are exposed. Use that end to push out obstruction, while vac is sucking on either end of it. I keep some odd lengths of armored cable around for just such contingencies. HTH, J
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I think the BX would be a good idea. You've also got the right idea to wonder if the clog is in the hose.
Wonder if the original poster tried the vac without the hose to see if it had draw back at the outlet?
Small note: The " symbol means inches.
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Christopher A. Young
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If the clog is in the hose, the unit will build up vacuum, the motor will go higher pitch and when you try to unplug the hose from the inlet, there will be a hugh rush of air. If it is in the tubing, you won't have the big air rush. On mine, if the hose is plugged and plugged pretty solid, it becomes hard to even remove the hose connector from the inlet. Also, if the hose is plugged and you lay it out on the floor, you can usually see the hose contract on the wall side of the clog. Running you ear along the hose can frequently find a large turbulant sound at the clog. Sometimes, if you flex the hose at that spot, it will break up and get sucked in as the clog is usually one item catching a bunch of other things.
Stormin Mormon wrote:

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The clog is definitely in the hose; there's plenty of "draw" at the outlet when using the other hose I have for another floor. We'll try the garden hose... Thanks for all the suggestions!
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